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I don't understand why you guys make this out to be a race/trick/super sport. Its an awesome sport tourer, so many more power/ super sport bikes out there for wheelies. Enjoy what you have but as far as sport/performance bikes, it is not even in the top 20.
Some of us like to go fast... but in relative comfort! This bike should not be able to beat an R1, but I passed this guy all day... until we hit the back straight! :oops: :D

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I don't understand why you guys make this out to be a race/trick/super sport. Its an awesome sport tourer, so many more power/ super sport bikes out there for wheelies. Enjoy what you have but as far as sport/performance bikes, it is not even in the top 20.
Of course your basic point makes sense, but real world is not so kind. I’m fortunate enough to own three bikes, so I have both sides of the Ninja1000 covered with other bikes.

But most people can only afford one bike. So if you love speed and being a hooligan, but you also need a bike to commute on and maybe do some long weekend trips on, you buy a Ninja 1000 that can do it all. It may not be the best track day bike, or the best touring bike, or the best commuter, but it may be the best compromise for being able to do all three.

Its kind of like a statement I see frequently on articles/tests of high performance cars. The like to say “fuel economy is not very good, but people who buy cars like this don’t care about fuel economy”. That to me is a stupid statement. There are plenty of speed freaks who are living paycheck to paycheck and they would love to get better gas mileage. But they are deciding which compromise they can live with.
 

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It's also fun to have a bike that is good at a few things. Anyone can buy a specific track bike, or a tourer, but when you start to combine these types, most bikes won't do it very well. This bike had the potential to be pretty damn good at both as well as being a fun, in town bike. That's interesting.

Single use bikes and cars are fun to own, but they usually spend more time sitting than they do being used.
 
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But most people can only afford one bike. So if you love speed and being a hooligan, but you also need a bike to commute on and maybe do some long weekend trips on, you buy a Ninja 1000 that can do it all. It may not be the best track day bike, or the best touring bike, or the best commuter, but it may be the best compromise for being able to do all three.
This is me. I'd love to have 3+ bikes, but it just ain't in the cards. So the N1K handles all those tasks for me, and does them all well enough to keep me satisfied.
 

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Of course your basic point makes sense, but real world is not so kind. I’m fortunate enough to own three bikes, so I have both sides of the Ninja1000 covered with other bikes.

But most people can only afford one bike. So if you love speed and being a hooligan, but you also need a bike to commute on and maybe do some long weekend trips on, you buy a Ninja 1000 that can do it all. It may not be the best track day bike, or the best touring bike, or the best commuter, but it may be the best compromise for being able to do all three.
You beat me to my own speech! After a long line of "do-it-all" VFRs the Z1000SX seemed like a natural successor. It's a bit unfortunate Kawasaki decided to make it part of the "Ninja" line implying a no holds barred sports bike to customers and insurance companies alike. Mine does perfectly fine at (formerly) commuting, getting groceries, a day run to Glacier National Park (700 miles) or a shorter run through the twistiest roads I know of. No track time but I've been to the track with a buddy who used to track his Z1000.

That doesn't mean I left it stock but my mods were towards comfort and protection. The N1k just struck the closest balance of what I wanted.
 

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I think you all saying what I am saying. I am saying its a great do it all bike but it is not the fastest. That's what I said.
Here is what you said that lead me to my response….

“You didn't buy this bike to be the bad *** on the street. Its an awesome sport tourer, enjoy!”
 

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Some of us like to go fast... but in relative comfort! This bike should not be able to beat an R1, but I passed this guy all day... until we hit the back straight! :oops: :D

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exactly. I want a bit more sport than touring, a busa/zx14 is too committed for my wrists and knees, and the H2sx Is too expensive. I just want a fast, fun, comfortable, affordable bike. I just wish my N1K was a bit closer to 160 HP, then it would be...... Perfect. OK, 170.
 

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exactly. I want a bit more sport than touring, a busa/zx14 is too committed for my wrists and knees, and the H2sx Is too expensive. I just want a fast, fun, comfortable, affordable bike. I just wish my N1K was a bit closer to 160 HP, then it would be...... Perfect. OK, 170.
I tell people that I always want ten percent more power than I have :)
 

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I tell people that I always want ten percent more power than I have :)
Reminds me of a guys .sig from the past: "Too much power is almost enough"
 
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What I'm asking for really doesn't change the cost structure for the N1K or the use cases. Add more customization capability to the software. Let me choose more on the settings for launch control, wheel lift, ABS intervention, etc. Better access to electronic controls (at least on the 20+) costs nothing as they already did the engineering and only need to open the interface with adjustment factors. Add another $700 for better fork / suspension. That would bring it closer to a 100% solution.
 

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So back to the OP, yesterday was semi-nice, so I went out and tried to power it up in 2nd gear. Sadly, even starting in the 6-8k RPM range in sport mode it wouldn't pull the wheel. It did get light, so I would venture to guess that once the ECM is cracked (I'm being optimistic!) and we can derestrict the first three gears, it should pop right up without much fuss.
 

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Instead of relying on raw HP to pop the front end, why not use the clutch? You can clutch whoolies with bike 1/5th the power. No doubt raw HP is addictive, but motorcycling - and to a greater extent, motoring in general - is a finesse sport. What the bike can do is not as important as what you can do with the bike.

A little episode this morning reminded me of this thread. I was in my Kia Stinger just taking it easy on my way to work, hypermiling as usual. So I got to this section of my commute route that was a 4-narrow-lane divided neighborhood street. Most drivers tend to take it easy here as the middle 1/3 of it is a flashing signed school zone. I was in the right lane and this BMW came right up to my rear bumper. There were cars all around, so it wasn't like he - or I - could realistically go any faster than everybody else. Still, this driver acted rather impatient, like I was blocking his way to morning glory. Anyhow, I just minded my own business and tried to ignore his bright headlights in my rearview mirror. Then, we got to the end of the street, where it intersects I-69. This is a fun 90deg turn to the right, onto the 3-wide-lane 1-way feeder road. As I typically do... I braked late, maintaining as much momentum into the turn as possible, then a quick flick around the bend, and smoothly rolled on the throttle. It's not much different than I would've done on a motorcycle, and it helps keep the 2.0T from falling off boost. No sense stomping on the loud pedal. Afterall, I was still more-or-less hypermiling.

Well, by the time the BMW finished the turn, he was a growing 12-car lengths behind me. I could hear the unmistakable roar of inline6 modified exhaust coming on with a vengeance. A short while later, he screamed past me on the right, probably going at least 90mph, judging by how fast relative to my speed, which was around the 45mph PSL.

Now, I have no idea what that driver though of this little episode. Probably thought he spanked me good. :sneaky: In any case, I hoped he had fun. I sure did... all the while keeping the Stinger's avg mpg north of 30mpg.
 

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If you're on a 600cc bike or smaller, you clutch up wheelies. When you're on an open class bike, especially something like the N1K which is supposed to be a comfortable sport bike with a big 'ol engine, you expect it to be able to roll up wheelies like a dirt bike. Mine does and I like not having to abuse my clutch every time I wheelie.
 
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Instead of relying on raw HP to pop the front end, why not use the clutch? You can clutch whoolies with bike 1/5th the power. No doubt raw HP is addictive, but motorcycling - and to a greater extent, motoring in general - is a finesse sport. What the bike can do is not as important as what you can do with the bike.
Well yea. It'll clutch-up no problem. But the OP was about power wheelies, so I tested that.

If you're on a 600cc bike or smaller, you clutch up wheelies. When you're on an open class bike, especially something like the N1K which is supposed to be a comfortable sport bike with a big 'ol engine, you expect it to be able to roll up wheelies like a dirt bike. Mine does and I like not having to abuse my clutch every time I wheelie.
Also, this. 100%
 
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Well yea. It'll clutch-up no problem. But the OP was about power wheelies, so I tested that.
I commented right after your post, but I was referring to this thread topic in general. So that was a rhetorical question, not one directly at you. :)

To me, power whoolies are just a byproduct of pouring on the coal off the straights. That HP rush certainly can be fun. It's one thing to watch Moto GP riders do it after every other corner. It's quite another for us mere mortals, who don't do it for paychecks, in everyday road riding. Even for track, it isn't uncommon for instructors to preach the "Slow is smooth; smooth is fast" mantra. These days, with all the electronic aides (TC, IMU, wheelie control, etc.), it's all too easy to yank a handful on corner exit - even with a 200+HP bike - and just let the ECU keep you from ending up in the weeds. All else being equal though, the way to go consistently fast is by being smooth on your throttle control.

I mentioned that episode precisely because by setting the right cornering speed, carrying momentum into a turn and rolling throttle back on smoothly and progressively from mid-turn on, a 600cc supersport can outpace a 1000cc litersport that misjudges entry speed and compensates by squirting out of the corner guns blazing and front wheel in the air.

However, if you guys are talking about the 1/4 mile stuff or plain roll-on acceleration, then don't mind me. What I said don't apply.
 
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You are absolutely correct Volfy, no question. We preach the same. Slower is Faster. It's all about being smooth, judging corner entry speed correctly and above all carrying momentum. I love enlightening 1000cc hypersport riders on my 40 hp street thumper. All I'm saying is for us gristled old ex-racer hooligans that absolutely refuse to grow up, it's AWESOME to catch power wheelies in between above said activities.
 
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"Slow is smooth; smooth is fast"
Slower is Faster
Oh yea. This is so true, not only in motorcycles, but in all of life. My BJJ instructors say this a lot, and I've heard it said by martial arts instructors of all disciplines.

it's AWESOME to catch power wheelies in between above said activities.
Also this. As much as we know the above is true, it's still fun to just grab a handful of throttle and pop the wheel up.
 

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Oh yea. This is so true, not only in motorcycles, but in all of life. My BJJ instructors say this a lot, and I've heard it said by martial arts instructors of all disciplines.



Also this. As much as we know the above is true, it's still fun to just grab a handful of throttle and pop the wheel up.
I'm not the most experienced rider. I'm 55 years old, rode quite a bit in high school and college, and started a year ago on an sv650. Put 6,000 miles on that bike and traded on a 2021 N1K, and have nearly 5,000 on the ninja. The sv was much easier the wheelie on the throttle in first, and would jump really abruptly with my inexperience slamming it down in ugly fashion. As much as people celebrate it as a good beginner bike, I find the N1K MUCH more tame due to the nannies.

I've got to say I LOVE the way sport mode allows a nice, predictable 1st gear power wheelie that very gently sets itself back down. I know this is a computer masking my inexperience, but I don't care. It's still awesome fun.
 
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