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I don’t know how long these have been around but I only discovered them last year and I am looking for excuses to wire things!!!
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That should make a fairly strong joint and offer excellent ingress protection. It offers a solder-like junction without need for soldering equipment. For an inline splice, I prefer good old fashion solder joint. Butane powered soldering iron makes it very convenient and pretty darn fast. I also use adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing that seals the joint from water ingress and makes it mechanically very secure.
 

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BTW, those splice tubes use high temp PTFE shrink tubing in order to withstand high temp from heat gun, enough to melt the low temp solder ring. I would strip more than what they show in the instruction there and twist the bare wire strands tightly together before inserting the splice tube (see below pic). Problem is the tin ring doesn't always melt completely and even if it does the solder may not flow out well to bond the bare wire ends together. You'd be better off having good electrical contact and mechanical connection before applying the splice tube. Just make sure the bare wire ends are between the internal ferrules, which are meant to seal tight against the wire jacket for IP.

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Here's a good video review of different options.

I like these solderless kits. If you're like me and have an old, electric Radio Shack solder iron and are NOT a soldering expert, you'll get a cleaner joint with this kit.

That said, there's no free lunch. I started using this kit with a cigarette lighter, and then I realized needed a heat gun to do it properly. So you'll want:

1) The solderless kit

2) A heat gun (Porter Cable makes a good one) or a hair dryer in a pinch.

3) A reflector thingy so the heat gun can warm up all sides of the joint at once and melt the solder. I used aluminum foil my first time but then bought the reflector.

Kuject 160PCS Solder Seal Wire Connector Kit
This one has good sizes for motorcycle wire.

Steinel Reflector Nozzle

With this equipment, I was able to fix up the rear turn signal and brake light wires on my (now sold) Yamaha V-Max. Someone had butchered them while messing.with different seat and tail section options. The repair was strong and waterproof.
 

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Radio shack sold some "super solder" No idea what this stuff was, but it made joints super easy to make. Even the stuff I did looked amazing, and that's saying something. Volfy, what was that solder, and is it stiff available?
 

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Dunno. It's been a long while since there is a Radio Shack for me to walk into... even longer since there is one that was worth it for me to walk into. Towards the end of their slow and inevitable death, they just turned into a sucky consumer electronics store.

It's probably just a different alloy composition solder that melt at a lower temp. There are also alloys that make for a stronger mechanical joint but tougher to melt and work with.

As I have mentioned in another thread, what insulation covering you use on the splice is just as important - if not more so - than the method you use to do the splice. I use adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing whenever I can, especially for applications like motorcycle wiring that will see exposure to the elements. You can find it at most well-stock electrical parts stores. Harborfreight even sells them. Marine Heat Shrink Tubing Assortment With Case, 42 Pc. I've bought them there and they are of good quality. Only thing I don't like is that they precut to shorter lengths, which can lead to some waste. I prefer to get longer (4ft+) and cut to exact lengths I need.
 

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As I have mentioned in another thread, what insulation covering you use on the splice is just as important - if not more so - than the method you use to do the splice. I use adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing whenever I can, especially for applications like motorcycle wiring that will see exposure to the elements. You can find it at most well-stock electrical parts stores. Harborfreight even sells them. Marine Heat Shrink Tubing Assortment With Case, 42 Pc. I've bought them there and they are of good quality. Only thing I don't like is that they precut to shorter lengths, which can lead to some waste. I prefer to get longer (4ft+) and cut to exact lengths I need.
Lots of this stuff on eBay as well in every color, size and length you can imagine. I even used a piece of 1" stuff under my grip heater elements. I find having red and black in both 1/2" and 1/4", 3:1 covers almost all my needs. It not only adds weatherproofing but physically integrity to the joint.

And my 1 pound roll of 60/40 rosin core solder is down to the last couple of feet. :(
 

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It not only adds weatherproofing but physically integrity to the joint.
It absolutely does. We use it a lot at work for industrial controls. I quite often spec it for making cable end connections, as it toughens the cable and acts as a strain relieve, right where the cable is stressed the most.

Dry heat shrink tubing does it to some extent, but that adhesive locks to everything it comes into contact with.
 

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I think this is my RADIO Shack soldier. When you make two, or three joints, per year, you dont get very good at it. This soldier was easy to use and always looked nice. I wonder how old these two rolls are? I'm thinking the late 1990's?
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