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'05 CBR1000RR, '18 CBR1000RR SP, '21 Ninja 1000SX
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mine seems to be hovering around 140 degrees F (or 60 degrees C).
What is yours?
 

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'05 CBR1000RR, '18 CBR1000RR SP, '21 Ninja 1000SX
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm a little curious why the Ninja's operating temperature is so much lower than my Honda's.
 

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2019 Ninja 1000 ABS w/ Akrapovic Slip Ons.
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Last weekend I went for a long ride, got stuck in traffic and watched the bar graph gauge for coolant temp get 1 from the top on 45 F (7 C) day. I thought that was odd. Got home and noticed that service manual says radiator fan turns on at 212 F (100C). I had ear plugs in so do not know if fan was running or not. Do not know what my normal operating temp is, as it does not have a readout. I hooked up a bluetooth ODBII reader, so I will start monitoring the cooling temp on the phone. It got me curious about operating temps too…as normally my bar graph read quite low, and at stop lights and after stopping a refueling, is quite high. Looks like it just varies a lot based on sensor placement.
 

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In the winter mine runs 130-140 F. I think that's too cold too. I know with Ivan's tune the thermostat open earlier, but I'm sure not that early. I tend to worry a little about incomplete combustion and moisture in the crankcase when the temp never gets above 140.
 
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At this time of the year, it is hovering around 40's - 50's.
At those ambient temperatures I would think 140-160 to be around normal. If you are running it hard, as in you favor a lower gear and higher rpm for a given road speed the engine temps would be higher. On the other hand if you are cruising (most likely) where the engine rpm is enough to maintain the highway speed you desire I would expect the lower temps you are are seeing.
 

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2019 Ninja 1000 ABS w/ Akrapovic Slip Ons.
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Did not realize they run so cold Burtcaster. So looks like they run run hot and cold. At speed They get plenty of air and try to run at around 140F, then stopped, they heat up to 212+. Engines may run more efficiently warmer, but can’t you make more power colder..tolerate more timing advance, leaner, with colder temps,etc? Sounds like a way to have an engine make power, and then idle sitting around, and do well on emissions.

Here is a blurb from the service manual. I disagree with the last sentence…140 to 212 is not narrow limits.
Font Circle Number Rectangle Screenshot
 

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Your key there is "do well on emissions,". With the euro 5 bikes, the cold engine has 45 seconds to be emissions compliant. That's it. No exceptions. The ECU manages all this and does some interesting things to make the engine get hot, fast. The euro 5 is more strict, but even back in the euro 3 days, like my bike is, these regulations had to be met.

Once it's hot, and compliant, it does other things, especially near idle, to keep itself in the correct temperature range. It has to remain complaint. Low ambient temps can't be able to knock the bike in and out of compliance. Many if those things hurt performance, and low end throttle response, but there's no choice. You have to keep the heat.

Ivan doesn't mess with the thermostat. That's a mechanical part that looks just like something we buy , at Auto Zone. I should say, "could buy" mine is always sold out of anything I want. But maybe, the god are with me and I could buy one.

What Ivan does do is lower the fan "on temp". He turns it on earlier than stock. That's fine, but you also have to address the "things" that cause the temp to climb, artificially fast. If you don't, all that happens is the coing fan runs all the time. He does that, as well .

That's a big part of the reason we have liquid cooling. Temperature management. The temp is managed way more so than being a random thing based on ambient temps.
 

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2019 Ninja 1000 ABS w/ Akrapovic Slip Ons.
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Started my bike up cold today, and just let it idle and watched the coolant temp via the ODBII port. Slowly came up to 212 (all but one bar lit up on bar graph) and then fan came on…then cycled on and off keeping it in the 205 to 212 range. Then went for a 100 mile ride and with the air moving through the radiator it dropped and then stayed in the 140 to 150 range..well 2 bars on the dash‘s bar graph. Ambient temps between 40 and 60F today.

I am used to seeing thermostats operate in the 185 to 190 range for cars. Performance low temp thermostats typically only go down to 160 or so for cars…140 is shockingly low to me. One side effect, is as long as we keep moving, the engine heat should not be as bad on us…compared to if they had a 180 to 190 thermostat. That would be a lot more heat between our legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Started my bike up cold today, and just let it idle and watched the coolant temp via the ODBII port. Slowly came up to 212 (all but one bar lit up on bar graph) and then fan came on…then cycled on and off keeping it in the 205 to 212 range. Then went for a 100 mile ride and with the air moving through the radiator it dropped and then stayed in the 140 to 150 range..well 2 bars on the dash‘s bar graph. Ambient temps between 40 and 60F today.

I am used to seeing thermostats operate in the 185 to 190 range for cars. Performance low temp thermostats typically only go down to 160 or so for cars…140 is shockingly low to me. One side effect, is as long as we keep moving, the engine heat should not be as bad on us…compared to if they had a 180 to 190 thermostat. That would be a lot more heat between our legs.
Very nice!
What type of ODB2 port reader did you use?
Do you need special adapters?

I have been using ODB readers for my cars but haven't found one suitable for bikes yet.
 

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Very nice!
What type of ODB2 port reader did you use?
Do you need special adapters?

I have been using ODB readers for my cars but haven't found one suitable for bikes yet.
I use the ODBLink MX+. I do not know how this compares to other readers for motorcycles. I chose this unit because it is compatible with Ford cars and light trucks. It communicates to every canbus network and system in my truck, and can run detailed diagnostics on just about every subsystem and network of a Ford vehicle using the forscan app…but that is off subject. I just tried it on the Ninja, and seems to work. Was going to use it on my Triumph…but have not gotten around to it.

ODB II scanner I use:

Bike has a Kawasaki diagnostic port under the seat, so you need an adapter cable to ODBII. It is just a loose cable plugged into some foam. Just pull up and then figure out how to remove the protective cap…(squeeze on tab and pull). I use the following and use double sided tape and tie wraps to mount the scanner under the pillion seat. Then connect over Bluetooth to my iPhone, and use the odblink app..which is fairly basic, but has add on modules for cars that do much more.


Might want to check their product finder page if you have a different model year.


Evidently, many Japanese bikes have the same connector, but the pin outs are different between manufacturers and possibly bikes. This woolichracing cable is a quality looking cable. I recommend just getting one from them over e-bay, but I am sure e-bay has ones that work too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the info. That's what I need.
I actually have a OBD scanner via bluetooth to my phone. So, I just need an adapter to the bike's interface.
 
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