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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The other item I always carry on the bike is a small USB thumb drive. The thumb drive is stored in a plastic zip-lock bag, inside a second plastic zip-lock bag to ensure that the drive stays waterproof. On that drive I have :--
  • a complete electronic copy of the N1K Service Manual
[...]
I bought the OEM Service Manual as a hardcopy but I didn't realize they have it in electronic version as well?
How did you get that?
 

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I bought the OEM Service Manual as a hardcopy but I didn't realize they have it in electronic version as well?
How did you get that?
The World Wide Web & Google are both your friends. If your computer skills are not very good, then look on eBay for a set of CDs, and just copy the files to the thumb drive.

Your 2021 N1K is so far different from my 2019 N1K, that my service manual would be of limited use to you.
 

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<< snip >> And RC's right, the Ninja better be extra reliable since they neglected the center stand. Harder than heck to fix a flat (my most common roadside repair) without one.
My Touring Jack. Perfect for getting the wheel off the ground to spin the rear wheel to lubricate the chain and/or find that elusive puncture hole. Weighs next to nothing, small in size and inexpensive.

Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Bicycle tire
 

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Arthur, you could check, but it's probably worth deflating the rear tire and seeing if the bike will still stand up. Mine will, barely. My rear shock is longer than stock . It's like the kickstand is too long.

The flat tire maks the bike sit a few inches lower..I don't know if I would trust it if the wind was blowing..My c14 won't. A flat rear tire also makes the centerstand difficult to deploy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
The World Wide Web & Google are both your friends. If your computer skills are not very good, then look on eBay for a set of CDs, and just copy the files to the thumb drive.

Your 2021 N1K is so far different from my 2019 N1K, that my service manual would be of limited use to you.
OK, if I understand you correctly, you were referring to the pirated copies, where they physically scan every page and concatenated them into a PDF. I have seen those.
I thought you found an OEM electronic copy, which I don't know about and that's why I asked.
 

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Certainly there are pirated copies on the web, but some of the CDs on eBay seem to have been licensed by Kawasaki, otherwise eBay and/or Kawasaki would have them removed.
 

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Oh yeah, most important, spare key, credit card, cash and phone ALWAYS in the riding suit. As the old commercial said: "Don't leave home without it!"
My Touring Jack. Perfect for getting the wheel off the ground to spin the rear wheel to lubricate the chain and/or find that elusive puncture hole. Weighs next to nothing, small in size and inexpensive.
I remember your clever design but the question is: simulate a flat rear tire and use your jack to get the rear wheel off the ground. Ninja's don't sit up well on the sidestand without air in the rear tire. I needed a buddy to roll the bike while I found the intruding nail and then we had to pick a spot sloping to the left to get the Ninja to stand up on the side stand while we fixed it. Probably ought to build up your little jack and carry it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
My Touring Jack. Perfect for getting the wheel off the ground to spin the rear wheel to lubricate the chain and/or find that elusive puncture hole. Weighs next to nothing, small in size and inexpensive.

View attachment 32399
Is this a self-made improvised jack or sold commercially?
One-sided or two?
 

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Most of the discussion so far has been about tools & spares for a N1K, but there are 2 more other things I would like to suggest you consider when you are touring.

1) First Aid kit.
I don't carry one for the simple reason that most commercial kits are useless in the event of a motorcycle crash. No first aid kit is going to help treat the typical injuries like concussion, broken bones, internal injuries etc. If you, or one of your riding buddies has a crash, and has any injuries beyond very mild gravel rash no bigger than the palm of your hand, then call an ambulance. Yes, it going to cost money, but it beats the alternative, like dying from an un-diagnosed injury..

That said, I do take an approved First Aid course every 5 years or so, and know what to do when someone has a heart attack (common in my age group), perform CPR, stop bleeding, and other "first responder" type activities.

2) I.C.E Dog Tags.
I always store my wallet in my luggage so that I don't loose it out of my riding pant's pocket. Unfortunately, the Paramedic who is attending my unconscious body at a crash site does not know this, and misses out on some important information, like I take a blood thinner every day and that I am allergic to penicillin, not to mention my next of kin info.

So, I wear an I.C.E "dog tag" under my riding jacket. This way, when the Paramedic or ED doctor carefully cuts away my expensive riding jacket (up both jacket sleeves, wrist to shoulder, across the chest and down the zipper) he will find my lime green "dog tags" with all the key information.

There are commercial version available but I just bought a really soft silicone rubber luggage tag, typed up my I.C.E details and had it laminated.

Gadget Font Electric blue Electronic device Technology
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Most of the discussion so far has been about tools & spares for a N1K, but there are 2 more other things I would like to suggest you consider when you are touring.

1) First Aid kit.
I don't carry one for the simple reason that most commercial kits are useless in the event of a motorcycle crash. No first aid kit is going to help treat the typical injuries like concussion, broken bones, internal injuries etc. If you, or one of your riding buddies has a crash, and has any injuries beyond very mild gravel rash no bigger than the palm of your hand, then call an ambulance. Yes, it going to cost money, but it beats the alternative, like dying from an un-diagnosed injury..

That said, I do take an approved First Aid course every 5 years or so, and know what to do when someone has a heart attack (common in my age group), perform CPR, stop bleeding, and other "first responder" type activities.

2) I.C.E Dog Tags.
I always store my wallet in my luggage so that I don't loose it out of my riding pant's pocket. Unfortunately, the Paramedic who is attending my unconscious body at a crash site does not know this, and misses out on some important information, like I take a blood thinner every day and that I am allergic to penicillin, not to mention my next of kin info.

So, I wear an I.C.E "dog tag" under my riding jacket. This way, when the Paramedic or ED doctor carefully cuts away my expensive riding jacket (up both jacket sleeves, wrist to shoulder, across the chest and down the zipper) he will find my lime green "dog tags" with all the key information.

There are commercial version available but I just bought a really soft silicone rubber luggage tag, typed up my I.C.E details and had it laminated.

View attachment 32404
Yes, I agree FirstAid kit is vital and that should be easily retrievable with one hand because the hand may be broken.
I have read of multiple crashes where the bike & motorcyclist were thrown into the woods, with the rider waking up a few hours later from a concussion with broken ribs and punctured lung and perforated kidney. These are difficult situations to be in and we should, at least, have some ideas on what to do while we are not in those situations.

I'm seriously considering getting a Garmin 2-way satellite comm so that my family members can track me 99% of the time without any dependency on cell signal coverage.

Another matter which all of you should consider is air-bag. They are quite affordable now (around $600-700). I have done some research on this and I own 2 (tethered and electronic). Air-bags prevent many rib-breakage scenarios and consequently reduce the chances of lung punctures and kidney damages.
 

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Over the years, I helped several motorcycles that had broken down. I went all over the western USA, in a service truck. I didnt have a huge metric assortment, but usually had something available to help them.

Flat tires were the most common thing I saw, and I realize you cant stop that. The mechanical stuff like cables, and brake pads were mistakes that should have been caught before they ever started their adventure.

The most common issues, that I ever helped with, were electrical issues. People not doing a good, clean install of the electric accessories, or running way more items than the motorcycle could support, long term. Heated hear takes a lot of power to run.

I would bet you 1000.00 that no local dealers in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, or Nevada would have a clutch cable for our bikes. I would have said clutch and brake levers, too, but our clutch lever is somewhat common and the brake lever is too. I would probably only bet 100.00 on those two.

Ebay is a good source for cheap, spare parts.You dont need levers that are 100%new bouncing around in a saddlebag.
 

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<< SNIP >>
I would bet you 1000.00 that no local dealers in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, or Nevada would have a clutch cable for our bikes. I would have said clutch and brake levers, too, but our clutch lever is somewhat common and the brake lever is too. I would probably only bet 100.00 on those two.
I was intrigued by your comment RC so I did a little research last night, and like most times you are correct.
  • the 2011 to 2019 N1K brake lever is quiet common across many Kawasaki models.
  • the 2017 to 2019 N1Ks clutch lever is only shared across a few models.
  • the clutch cable is only used on the 2017 to 2021 N1K, but the Versys cable, which is a little longer, will also fit.
  • The bad news is that the 2020/21 N1K have unique clutch and brake levers and not shared.
Font Material property Pattern Number Parallel
 

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Most of the discussion so far has been about tools & spares for a N1K, but there are 2 more other things I would like to suggest you consider when you are touring.

1) First Aid kit.
I don't carry one for the simple reason that most commercial kits are useless in the event of a motorcycle crash. No first aid kit is going to help treat the typical injuries like concussion, broken bones, internal injuries etc. If you, or one of your riding buddies has a crash, and has any injuries beyond very mild gravel rash no bigger than the palm of your hand, then call an ambulance. Yes, it going to cost money, but it beats the alternative, like dying from an un-diagnosed injury..
Exactly my thoughts on first aid kit. I know several riders that carry them and I just wonder why bother with the loss of space. Carry a little personal one in case you accidentally punch something sharp while lubing your chain in a parking lot, but you don't need some $120 navy seal mil spec med kit. If you/buddy crashes you need a phone with service to call the woo woo wagon and the tow truck unless it's a lucky walk away. Nothing in those kits is going to magically put back together a tib fib, broken collar bone, concussion, or a fence post going through your leg. And unless you're trained, you wouldn't even know what to do even if you showed up driving the ambulance.

I think people just really want to use the included scissors that can cut pennies. You can buy raptors without the kit. Have fun cutting pennies!
 

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Murph, just for fun, do you dealers stock these common parts, or are they like ours?
Most Dealers / Workshops I have visited carry a very limited range of "quick moving" spare parts. That means just about everything has to be ordered in from the Distributor's warehouse in eitehr Sydney or Melbourne. Typically, that means a wait of about 1 week at best.

I carry a spare clutch lever & clutch cable in my saddlebags, and have a selection of other spare parts at home that my wife can "over night" courier to me, if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Talking about Levers, they are cheap parts and for spares, it is certainly worthwhile to get a couple more from eBay/Chinese-made ones as long as they fit.
 

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Exactly my thoughts on first aid kit. I know several riders that carry them and I just wonder why bother with the loss of space. Carry a little personal one in case you accidentally punch something sharp while lubing your chain in a parking lot, but you don't need some $120 navy seal mil spec med kit. If you/buddy crashes you need a phone with service to call the woo woo wagon and the tow truck unless it's a lucky walk away.

Nothing in those kits is going to magically put back together a tib fib, broken collar bone, concussion, or a fence post going through your leg. And unless you're trained, you wouldn't even know what to do even if you showed up driving the ambulance.

I think people just really want to use the included scissors that can cut pennies. You can buy raptors without the kit. Have fun cutting pennies!
I agree 100% with your comments. Use a folded up t-shirt as a pad & hand pressure will stop bleeding, reassure the injured rider and wait for the paramedics to arrive.

Here is a link to a Fortnine video on Crash Scene protocols. It may well come in handy at some time !. Crash Scene with a Paramedic
 

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Regarding levers... shorties tend not to get banged up in an off. You can get foldable shorties that are even less prone to crash damage. I just have fixed ones. If an off is violent enough to touch shortie levers, I highly doubt the rest of the bike will be in any rideable shape. I had 2 offs on the VFR1200F, the 2nd of which totaled it. Not a scratch on either lever.
 
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