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What do you do with a new bike?

  • Break In

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • Mods

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • Familiarizing

    Votes: 2 11.8%
  • Ride, Ride, RIDE

    Votes: 7 41.2%
  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    17
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Discussion Starter #1
Each rider is unique, but none of can resist the excitement of a new steed. Whats your favorite part of getting a new bike/most important part of getting a new bike?

Breaking her in

Mods and Farkles

Familiarizing with new controls and riding style

Ride, Ride, Ride

Other, tell us what...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Breaking it in is an easy process, just riding it normally, but of course you dont want to rev the piss out of it.
well not always, but you do want some hard runs right at the outset, this guys does a much better job explaining than I ever could :D

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??
The Short Answer: Run it Hard !

Why ??
Nowadays, the piston ring seal is really what the break in process is all about. Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber.

If you think about it, the ring exerts maybe 5-10 lbs of spring tension against the cylinder wall ...
How can such a small amount of spring tension seal against thousands of
PSI (Pounds Per Square Inch) of combustion pressure ??
Of course it can't.

How Do Rings Seal Against Tremendous Combustion Pressure ??

From the actual gas pressure itself !! It passes over the top of the ring, and gets behind it to force it outward against the cylinder wall. The problem is that new rings are far from perfect and they must be worn in quite a bit in order to completely seal all the way around the bore. If the gas pressure is strong enough during the engine's first miles of operation (open that throttle !!!), then the entire ring will wear into
the cylinder surface, to seal the combustion pressure as well as possible.


The Problem With "Easy Break In" ...
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run.

There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!

If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat. Once that happens there is no solution but to re hone the cylinders, install new rings and start over again.

Fortunately, most new sportbike owners can't resist the urge to "open it up" once or twice,
which is why more engines don't have this problem !!

An additional factor that you may not have realized, is that the person at the dealership who set up your bike probably blasted your brand new bike pretty hard on the "test run". So, without realizing it, that adrenaline crazed set - up mechanic actually did you a huge favor !!
 

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You know though, even at idle theres huge amounts of pressure and heat. I mean, when you stop and think about rpm, that still means the engine is turning over 1800 times in that minute...thirty per second.

Heat? Let bike idle for five minutes. Touch exhaust header with tip of.....finger..and see if its hot.
 

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This is great news for me since I always felt guilty on my break in.

I didn't mean to push my bike when it was new but the urge was too strong and my riding buddy had a Ducati sport bike and pushed me all the time during my break in period. I even got a speeding ticket (92 on a 70) on a highway on my second outing with my new bike.

Today I have over 7500 miles and my bike purrs like a kitten...lion.. I mean.:cool:
 

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One thing..check the chain on your Ninja. Mine was WAY too tight. Had I ran it the first 600 miles like that, I'd have shaved half its lifespan away. Actually, mine was tight enough to damage bearings.

I tend to do the 3000 mile check on a brand new bike. Obviously, you skip the airfilter and such, but double check any adjustments.

I showed my chain to the service manager when I was picking up my "new" bike. I had him stand there and pushed the chain up and down....it would not budge.

I mentioned the "set up" and "delivery fee" and calmly told him this is why you'll never see a cent, from me, for service. He shook his head and said, "I dont blame you."

At that point, I expected a discount, refund, or somehting..even a gift certificate. I got dick.

Thats why I dont go back to them, for anything. Not even chain lube. I know they read this forum, so I hope they understand.
 
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