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When I get new tires, I ride to the nearest clean (ish), empty parking lot, and after checking for any loose sand on the pavement, I ride figure 8's in 2nd gear, low throttle, leaning the bike farther down each time around. I don't have to ride fast to get a high lean angle. I just decrease the radius of the turn (carefully), while doing about 15-20 mph or so. [Disclaimer: If you are not confident in your ability to execute fine throttle control while riding, leaning and turning the bike, then don't do this.] This roughens up the edges of the tread nicely. This "roughness" in the side tread rubber now "matches" or interlocks with the texture of the pavement, helping cornering traction and break-in . I still take it easy for the first 50 miles, to get used to how the new shaped tires lean and turn, as well as covering the heat cycling. As an added benefit (for the self concious rider), this gets rid of the chicken strips on your tires.
 

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I kill two birds with one stone. I'm fortunate enough to have a nice loop (my test/tire break-in loop) that I use instead of a parking lot. This way I get a nice little ride in while I'm at it. 馃榿
 
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I usually ride to my favorite twisty road and gradually lean the bike further until the chicken strips are gone...
That is a fine method. 馃檪
 
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This is one of the benefits of buying Continental tires; they use micro-dimpled dyes rather than petrolium release agents for their tire molds, meaning they have little to no need for formal "scrubbing in". The release agents in the normal manufacturing process are the primary culprit for new tire slippage. Think armorall.

Also, posting on release agents and tire slippage is where my life is for the next 4-6 months while I recover from shoulder surgery and watch my kid flog my N1K to keep it fresh.
 

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Why do we keep bringing up release agent when none of the good manufacturers use this? Not only do they not use it, it's been years since they stopped .

We can buy non stick pans for 7.99 at Wal Mart. Don't you imagine any reputable tire manufacturer might look at these coatings before they had to sell grease covered tires?

Just for fun, pretend they started using it,again. If it added any danger to the ire process, wouldn't they have found a way to clean it? They would save enough on their insurance policies to pay for any type of washing system.

Common sense is a good guide, if used properly
 

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Why do we keep bringing up release agent when none of the good manufacturers use this? Not only do they not use it, it's been years since they stopped .

We can buy non stick pans for 7.99 at Wal Mart. Don't you imagine any reputable tire manufacturer might look at these coatings before they had to sell grease covered tires?

Just for fun, pretend they started using it,again. If it added any danger to the ire process, wouldn't they have found a way to clean it? They would save enough on their insurance policies to pay for any type of washing system.

Common sense is a good guide, if used properly
[/QUOTE
Never been accused of having much common sense, I'm just parroting what I read on Continental tires being unique in this regard. I would also note that my Continental's did in fact come without any afformentionwd slime, and did in fact require little to no scrub-in IMO, unlike the Roadsmart's I put on my kids first bike, which were as greasy as Uma Thurman's armpits. having worked at a bike dealership, my kid became well-versed in which manufacturers shipped with the greasiest tires, with Honda's being particularly hazardous, which earned him his first trip to the ER with significant road rash after having a rebel 500 low side at 25 mph.

All anecdotel, but then again I apparently lack common sense.
 

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That idea, or concept you found is extremely popular in motorcycling. I'm not sure why? Maybe this happens in other specific interest hobbies, or whatever we call this motorcycle thing?

My though it people have a casual interest in the topic, but not really enough interest to spent time researching the topic. Tires are just one small part.

This special way of producing tires has to be fed, by us. It makes sense. People are nervous about this release agent that was used, but isn't used anymore. Rather than say that the industry has moved on and Teflon coated the molds, it becomes a positive, for them, to act as if they are the first,and only ones to have the idea.

At that point, they count on us to keep the idea alive. I believe Harley Davidson deserves an award for how they used the idea.

They started the "You have to be able to flatfoot the motorcycle to be safe." That was in the late 60's, early 70's. The idea worked so well it ended up destroying their future development. Harley dealers would keep a used cb750 or kz900 on the showroom floor. They would jack up it's suspension as high as possible. The gas tank would be full. Often times there was a slippery carpet that just happened to be where your feet go. The salesman would have you sit on this "dangerously high" bike and smack the handlebars, or lean in to the bike. It was even better if you happened to tip it over. The bike usually had damage from doing just that. Then you go over to the sportster. Empty tank, your knees are bent when you touch....safe at last. Look at the new Sportster with it's less than 3 inches of rear travel. They know better, but they can't walk it back.

If you go to Facebook, it won't take five minutes to see someone lowering their bike as this idea never died and is just as strong as it was in 1972.

Single sided swingarms, and to a degree these ultra stiff, inverted forks we have. Aluminum frames......the list is long.
 

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That idea, or concept you found is extremely popular in motorcycling. I'm not sure why? Maybe this happens in other specific interest hobbies, or whatever we call this motorcycle thing?

My though it people have a casual interest in the topic, but not really enough interest to spent time researching the topic. Tires are just one small part.

This special way of producing tires has to be fed, by us. It makes sense. People are nervous about this release agent that was used, but isn't used anymore. Rather than say that the industry has moved on and Teflon coated the molds, it becomes a positive, for them, to act as if they are the first,and only ones to have the idea.

At that point, they count on us to keep the idea alive. I believe Harley Davidson deserves an award for how they used the idea.

They started the "You have to be able to flatfoot the motorcycle to be safe." That was in the late 60's, early 70's. The idea worked so well it ended up destroying their future development.

If you go to Facebook, it won't take five minutes to see someone lowering their bike as this idea never died and is just as strong as it was in 1972.

Single sided swingarms, and to a degree these ultra stiff, inverted forks we have. Aluminum frames......the list is long.
[/QUOTE
That idea, or concept you found is extremely popular in motorcycling. I'm not sure why? Maybe this happens in other specific interest hobbies, or whatever we call this motorcycle thing?

My though it people have a casual interest in the topic, but not really enough interest to spent time researching the topic. Tires are just one small part.

This special way of producing tires has to be fed, by us. It makes sense. People are nervous about this release agent that was used, but isn't used anymore. Rather than say that the industry has moved on and Teflon coated the molds, it becomes a positive, for them, to act as if they are the first,and only ones to have the idea.

At that point, they count on us to keep the idea alive. I believe Harley Davidson deserves an award for how they used the idea.

They started the "You have to be able to flatfoot the motorcycle to be safe." That was in the late 60's, early 70's. The idea worked so well it ended up destroying their future development.

If you go to Facebook, it won't take five minutes to see someone lowering their bike as this idea never died and is just as strong as it was in 1972.

Single sided swingarms, and to a degree these ultra stiff, inverted forks we have. Aluminum frames......the list is long.
I guess I'm a sucker for marketing. From the Continental website:
  • TractionSkin, a revolutionary new micro-rough tread surface, virtually puts an end to tire break-in. This is possible due to a new mold coating technology which eliminates the need for tire-release agents.
 

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Who isn't? We end up buying more things that we could ever research.

The last one that I noticed was brake fluid. I'm looking through the choices. DOT 3, DOT 4, etc but one caught my eye.

It was Lucas branded DOT 4. It was several dollars more than the Auto Zone DOT4, but it appeared as if it was worth it as it said "synthetic" on it's label. As we all know, synthetic is better...anyway...

Its specs were identical to the house brand. Not even one degree different in the wet boiling point. As it turns out, all brake is synthetic. Lucas was just smart enough to print that on the label.

Although there were "better" versions of the fluid, synthetic would not have been a way to identify that.
 

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Who isn't? We end up buying more things that we could ever research.

The last one that I noticed was brake fluid. I'm looking through the choices. DOT 3, DOT 4, etc but one caught my eye.

It was Lucas branded DOT 4. It was several dollars more than the Auto Zone DOT4, but it appeared as if it was worth it as it said "synthetic" on it's label. As we all know, synthetic is better...anyway...

Its specs were identical to the house brand. Not even one degree different in the wet boiling point. As it turns out, all brake is synthetic. Lucas was just smart enough to print that on the label.

Although there were "better" versions of the fluid, synthetic would not have been a way to identify that.
Dude, you mean I'm wasting money on gluten free spring water? 馃檪
 

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Gluten free tires?

At least there was no harm done. You had exceent tires. My synthetic brake fluid would be good as well.
 
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