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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All right. We all know they recommend scrubbing in tires. Whether or not it's really necessary is a question for another thread.

My question involves breaking in the side of the tire. In order to break in the side of the tire, you have to use the side of the tire. But to use it you have to hit a turn with enough speed to NEED to use it.

And therein lies the Catch 22. You need to break in the side before it's "safe" to use the side, but can't break it in without going fast enough to need to use it.
 
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2021 1000SX, Akra slip on, KQR side cases, to be continued.....
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Hmmm, I just proceed with slightly more caution and get some "lean on" in locations that have less dire consequences if things go south. There are a couple of nice long sweepers on my commute that have good site lines.
 
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All right. We all know they recommend scrubbing in tires. Whether or not it's really necessary is a question for another thread.

My question involves breaking in the side of the tire. In order to break in the side of the tire, you have to use the side of the tire. But to use it you have to hit a turn with enough speed to NEED to use it.

And therein lies the Catch 22. You need to break in the side before it's "safe" to use the side, but can't break it in without going fast enough to need to use it.
That's funny! This is what happens to you when you add logic!
 

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Yeah, it’s the age old question. How do you get experience if they only hire people with experience?

The best answer I have is to not over think it. Don’t brake hard while leaning over, and don’t hammer the bejeezus out of the throttle while leaned over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, it’s the age old question. How do you get experience if they only hire people with experience?

The best answer I have is to not over think it. Don’t brake hard while leaning over, and don’t hammer the bejeezus out of the throttle while leaned over.
Soooooo...ride like normal?
 

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There are some really cool videos showing exactly why you need to break in the tyre - the break in is just progressive lean over a few rides

 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are some really cool videos showing exactly why you need to break in the tyre - the break in is just progressive lean over a few rides
I mean, I know why it needs to be broken in. My point is it's impossible to break it in without actually going fast enough to use it. The only option I could see would be taking a turn that's normally done at, say, 55 mph in 3rd gear and instead doing it at 35 mph in 2nd gear. It'll reduce the load on the tire, but you still have to use the side of the tire to break it in.
 
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I mean, I know why it needs to be broken in. My point is it's impossible to break it in without actually going fast enough to use it. The only option I could see would be taking a turn that's normally done at, say, 55 mph in 3rd gear and instead doing it at 35 mph in 2nd gear. It'll reduce the load on the tire, but you still have to use the side of the tire to break it in.
Well the idea is progressive cornering just like you explain - gradually increase lean angles until you have used all the tyre - Age / Dust / Road Dust / Sunshine will all degrade the oils on the tyre - Rule of thumb is around 100 miles of easy use and your good to go
 
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Some where I read or listened to a tire rep, seems modern tire coatings require heat for breakin. When you lean the road friction creates the heat. So does hard acceleration and hard braking. I think most of the 100 miles needs to be done with some moderate to higher speed straight line runs in combination with a couple straight line threshold stops and moderate leans say 35-40 degrees. But don't listen to me I keep my traction control engaged!!!

Looks like the biker in the previous video lost it because too much throttle on cold tires on slippery cobblestone, it's rather funny and sad at the same time!
 

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Exactly, and that's why most of the break in stuff you read about is nonsense.

No matter what you do, there will be a first trip that goes over in to the brand new edge. A warm tire wouldn't have saved our video guy.
 

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I've seen a couple of nitwits crash leaving the shop on brand new tires. When they tell you to take it "easy" for the first 50 miles, that's a safe suggestion. It doesn't take much to "break" them in. At the track you can carefully scrub-in new tires within two laps. I believe it is the first heat cycle that gets rid of most of the mold release agent along with gently working up to lean angles. The key is to not be stupid and hammer the throttle within the first 15 seconds. On my local hill I'm hammering my brand new tires after about 10 miles.
 

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My understanding is that the 50 mile breakin recommendation is to allow several heat cycles to finish the curing process. It really doesn't have much to do with "roughing up" the surface of the tire.
After the breakin period, just don't go crazy until you're sure the tire and road surface are completely warm.
 

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They will all tell you mold release agent hasn't been used in a long time. Today's tire molds are beautiful, and smooth. More like a high quality cooking pan.

The curing, like Biker guy said happens. If you measure them, before and after this curing, they also grow just a little bit. You find this out if you ever install a tire with limited clearance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My understanding is that the 50 mile breakin recommendation is to allow several heat cycles to finish the curing process.
This makes far more sense than the "roughing it up" mantra. I can see this absolutely being necessary.
 

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Modern motorcycle sport and sport touring tires from any of the major brands are actually quite amazing these days. Just ease into it and you will be fine. By the time I have run a new set of sport rubber through about a dozen corners I am ready to ride them hard.
 
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They will all tell you mold release agent hasn't been used in a long time. Today's tire molds are beautiful, and smooth. More like a high quality cooking pan.

The curing, like Biker guy said happens. If you measure them, before and after this curing, they also grow just a little bit. You find this out if you ever install a tire with limited clearance.
Well this would certainly explain why brand new Q4s are pretty much ready to go after a few miles. 😁
 
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I had to deal with a tire manufacturer, in Kansas, I believe it was? No one would talk about the cost, but the molds had to be expensive. They were as close to perfect as possible.

Dunlop wouldn't use mold release, but Shinko? They probably still do, or it wouldn't surprise me if the did.

If the new tire was dangerous, it would have warning stickers. We are in a world where you have to remove a plastic cover to access the plug in a new TV .
 
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