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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading Lee Park's book "TOTAL CONTROL" in preparation for the Total Control Advanced Rider Courses 1 & 2 that I'm taking this weekend, and chapter 15 goes into great detail on how to setup your suspension. There was also a suggestion early in the book to make sure that your suspension is setup correctly before trying any of the excercises in the book.

So...I made an appointment with Mike @ QuikCycles in Denver, CO and he helped me measure, calculate and set my fork preload, compression/rebound damping. When I took it for a test ride - I WAS SHOCKED! It felt like I was riding someone else's motorcycle! The improvement was simply fantastic!

The bike came with 7 turns of preload on the forks. I weight 230# without gear, and to get my sag to 25mm he had to set it to 1/2 turn ! That is a huge difference. The fork springs are very strong on my bike!

We went through the same exercise with the rear, and the result were simply mind blowing.

*** If you haven't set your f/r sag for YOUR weight yet then you simply have no idea what you are missing! ***

Total Cost: $55 !! Best money I ever spent on anything in my life!!

-Troydba
 

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I've done hundreds of track days and that would be my first recommendation to anyone to have done to their bike as soon as they pull out of the motorcycle dealership, whether you are on the street or track. Best money ever spent!
 

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Ok this is the correct thread but we can expand it to include 11-13.

Troydba
You paid a dealer $55 to set rebound sag and damper? How long did it take?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You paid a dealer $55 to set rebound sag and damper? How long did it take?
He charged me for one hour of his time but spent about 1 hr 30 mins. or so.

I strongly recommend that you buy this book:

Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques: Lee Parks: 9780760314036: Amazon.com: Books

Chapter 15 on Suspension is worth 5 times the cost of the book alone.

It gives you all the info you need, including worksheets and formulas to help you PRECISELY determine what your rider sag should be for your bike as well as instructions on how to make it so.

The main thing is that you need to be able to lift your rear wheel off the ground without using the swing arm in order to take measurements required to calculate/set your sag - same with the front sag actually. It is simply impossible to do without this ability...

Even the best race engine mechanics tend to know next to nothing about suspension setup.

Knowledge is power brother!
 

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With input from the book and fellow mammals able to lift the bike
Would you have been able to do this yourself? I think I saw a YouTube video doing that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With input from the book and fellow mammals able to lift the bike
Would you have been able to do this yourself? I think I saw a YouTube video doing that.
Seriously? I would suggest TOOLS such as an actual lift. We have THUMBS after all LOL!
 

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The YouTube video did seem primitive and make shift.
When I read that you couldn't use a swing arm lift I didn't know there was an appropriate tool for this application.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The YouTube video did seem primitive and make shift.
When I read that you couldn't use a swing arm lift I didn't know there was an appropriate tool for this application.
The principle involved is the need to find out how much static sag you have - just from the weight of the bike. To measure this, the wheel has to hang free with interference from the jacking/lift. You don't have to buy one just for this, but you do need a method of getting the wheel to hang loose...

Read chapter 15 of the book mentioned above...

Best Wishes,
troydba
 

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The principle involved is the need to find out how much static sag you have - just from the weight of the bike. To measure this, the wheel has to hang free with interference from the jacking/lift. You don't have to buy one just for this, but you do need a method of getting the wheel to hang loose...

Read chapter 15 of the book mentioned above...

Best Wishes,
troydba

What other method would there be besides ABBA stand, a couple of knuckle dragging buddies as human lifts or a dealer?

If I could get a dealer to do it for what you paid, buying a stand would not make sense or cents. But if NYC service prices are $100-$200, then buying a stand for this and other long term purposes would be wise.

I read your amazon review on this book. I will have to compare it with Twist of the Wrist.
 

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To float the rear wheel, flip the pegs and lower the bike onto jack stands.

This technique allows you to take sag measurements or install new shock (as I was doing here with my Yamaha FZ-09).

 
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