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Hi! I want to install a steering damper on my 17 ninja but I can’t find anything for it. Any suggestions!?
 

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By all means get one. I have a custom made bracket, for a Scotts, and mines been on a long time. I dont believe the bracket I have is available anymore. It was expensive, and a huge pain in the add to obtain. Still, it was worth the effort. People think its just for headshake and thats only about 25% correct. Although it does deal with that, its valuable for everything else.

The aftermarket dampers have a huge range of adjustment. Not lime the stock dampers most get to deal with. You have settings that are basically nothing, all the way up to "VERY hard to turn bars." If you get on a freeway with a high setting its a product that will sell itself in about 10 seconds. You can make this light sportbike track like a GoldWing. Rough and abraded surfaces now feel like brand new pavement.
 

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Is the z1000 dampers fits on ninja?
From what I've seen no as the Z has traditional type handle bars. Never heard of anyone trying though... so anything is possible.
 

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I have the HyperPro RSC progressive damper with a Dimotiv mounting kit. Beautifully machined, awesome on the road. The confidence you get while riding aggressively and over bad road conditions (as RC mentioned) makes this mod an absolute must-have. I have a ‘16 bike but there is no difference with later model Ninjas around the bars area. The damper and kit will fit on any Ninja 1000.
 

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I'm gonna be "that" guy on this one....I've had other bikes that needed a damper but the N1K doesn't really need it (especially if you upgrade the suspension in any way). And I'm glad as for years of riding with a damper before I got my N1K, I'm very appreciative of the fact my the steering is very easy.

Now an electronic damper that could detect bad roads and potholes, that would be interesting........ LOL
 

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When I ran a 200 55 like @proto2o does I will say the bike did display more of a feeling it might start to head shake. Can't think of once though with properly inflated tires when running a 190 55 that I've felt it want to, not even North of 160.
 

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Don't confuse "need" with "want". Most of the time a person really does not "need" one, but there really are no occasions when you would not "want" one.

If a damper is set up really stiff, it can be slightly annoying in a parking lot. The point where you are at a walking speed. Other than that, it never really hurts anything. As the motorcycle goes faster, the bars and fork really don't turn much, so it's not as if you fight this massive resistance when you are riding along at 40....50.60, or more.

With aftermarket, rotary dampers you probably won't ever see electronic controls. You have a ton of available adjustments and several "states" where the damper is still, or barely there. A soft, slow turn of the bars won't have much resistance. A fast, "hit" will. They are an amazing product that will sell themselves within about 30 seconds, but damn hard to sell without experiencing one.
 

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I might be tempted to go back to a damper if I was confident there was enough low and high speed damping adjustment to keep the steering light at at low speeds but still have damping above a certain speed. I had Scotts on both my previous street bike and my motard at the same time and it was the motard one I liked best as it was "non-rebound". Even playing with the sweep adjustment and the high speed valve on the street one, I couldn't quite find a setting I was happy with. Maybe GPR's are better in this regard ?

I never road a Honda with one before to see if I actually liked it but I thought their electronic damper would be ideal for me, especially if it were actually adjustable.
 

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You know, if you call Scott's, they will ask you to describe what damper you have. Why? They had several batches that did not work properly. My used one just happened to be a good one. Dumb luck.

Chrispy, I wonder if yours were from that not good generation? Mine was from 2006. The issues were after that. A person should never buy a used one without calling Scotts.
 

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You know, if you call Scott's, they will ask you to describe what damper you have. Why? They had several batches that did not work properly. My used one just happened to be a good one. Dumb luck.

Chrispy, I wonder if yours were from that not good generation?
It's possible, I bought it used. Although except for the "non rebound" on the motard / dirt bike damper, they felt pretty similar otherwise.

Looking back, I should have switched dampers between bikes for a test.
 

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You had both, right? Dumb luck, but I did end up with the street model. I would like to try a dirt version, too...Scott's described them like this:

"The off-road damper is a non-rebound stabilizer, which means, as it sweeps away from center it has damping but the moment it changes direction back toward center the damping is free until it reaches center again, hence the term non-rebound or free-rebound. This was an important development in the off-road damper and is what makes our damper work so well. Its design is to allow the rider to correct for constant slides associated with off-roading while not fighting with the damping forces back to center. It's a serious advantage for the off-road rider. This feature helps prevent the common syndrome known as arm pump. Our stabilizer is the only one made with this feature.

The road bike damper design requires a totally different function and therefore is a rebound damper. A road bike is primarily leaned, not steered, and the damping forces need to be absorbed in both directions to maintain constant stability, due to the nature of the energy needing to be absorbed."
 

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Ill bet an electronic damper could be awesome, but insurance will never let it happen. I think they are afraid of a device that locks the handlebars. Although we would recognize that as bullshit, imagine explaining that to a group of non riders, sitting on a jury?

I have not found a circumstance where I don't like my Scott's damper. When it's really cold, below 30 degrees, the oil feels too thick, but that's about it.
 

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When I ran a 200 55 like @proto2o does I will say the bike did display more of a feeling it might start to head shake. Can't think of once though with properly inflated tires when running a 190 55 that I've felt it want to, not even North of 160.
I 200/55 raises the rear alittle bit. If you have head shake, taking some tire pressure out of the rear would help.

For me, the damper makes the front end feel so much more comfortable and solid feeling. HWY commuting is much more stable aswell.

Electronic dampers are garbage and do not work as well as static dampers.

Most who have zx10's with electric dampers change them out to gpr's, and hondas are known to have dampers which fail.

I have had some serious head shakes on my ZX10RR because of bumpy roads, and a weak electric damper.
 

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After two pages. The correct answer is get a GPR. Made right here in Southern California and awesome customer service. When I bought my mine they called me back to say I didn't take advantage of a sale and the refunded me the $100 difference! What are you waiting for? Just do it.

/thread
 
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