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I'm getting closer to the 7500 mile maintenance interval. The manual says to replace the spark plugs and air cleaner. I read through the manual. This looks pretty involved. I've had the fairings off a few times but never dug down into the engine. Anyone do this yet and what was the level of difficulty? Is this something best left to the dealer? I've taken tanks off my other bikes, but this looks a little more involved than the bikes I had in the past.
 

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I just did this on my 2012 N1K...its not that difficult to get down to the plugs..the outside ones need to use the swivel adapter to get down into them, as they are up against and under the frame a bit..with some patience this is a pretty straight forward job. I will say though that 7500 miles isnt that many for these plugs since they say there rated for 75000 miles..my bike has about 25000, I bought it at 21000 miles and from the looks of it was stock plugs and air cleaner that was still in there.
 

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Plugs

I have about 8500 miles on the plugs....performance seems fine and mileage hasn't changed...will probably leave them alone until 12000-15000 or so unless the motor says different....would there be any reason to change them I don't understand? I know I am a little lazy too........
 

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I have a 2014 and the Owner's manual calls for inspection only at 7500 mile intervals. If your spark plugs start to go, you will know it.
 

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I was debating on doing this change as my 2015 has 8000 miles which seems really low for a spark plug change. I think that thinking is from the car world though because after deciding to change them, I noticed a marked improvement in idle and smoothness in throttle application like the bike was brand new. The old plugs themselves looked fine but since these are iridium plugs with a very fine tip, that may be misleading.

The change itself is not too bad. Just make sure you are removing the fairings properly and you have different size extensions because if you don't, the number 1 and number 4 cylinder are a PITA. Also, you don't need to remove the gas tank as the service manual states. You just have to make sure its well supported. I used a bungee cord and connected it to the right side of the tank (there are posts on the tank which a plastic hook can go through) and the right passenger hand rail.
 

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Wait, these bikes come with Iridiums? Heck, those last much longer than standard plugs, and that's the whole point of them. I wouldn't even look at the **** things until at least 20K.
 

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I always follow the scheduled maintenance in the owner's manual, but I think they schedule expensive service items like plug changes and valve clearance inspections in the first 15,000 miles just so the dealerships have an opportunity to make more money.
 

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I wonder if this is more about removing them as opposed to a real performance thing?

I dont know if you've ever tried to remove a spark plug thats been installed for years, but I've seen them come out, along with the threads. This might just be a way to avoid that?
 

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I would hope that the factory is using anti-seize. If not, I can't imagine the threads galling after a paltry 20K miles. Maybe if you were to try and remove them from a hot engine I suppose they'd strip like they were getting paid to do it.
 

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I believe on modern fuel injected vehicles be it a car or bike the plugs last alot longer, i can see 25,000 miles shouldnt be a problem on the bike if its running right.
 

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I just changed mine over the winter @ 10,000 miles. They looked fine. I was more curious if Ivan's maps / reflash was having an affect on the plugs. Doesn't appear so.

I put fresh ones in and carefully packed away the original plugs for future use.
 

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Somebody should pull the specs on the OEM plugs and see what the manufacturer says - I'd be shocked if it's under 50,000 miles. Also check the European replacement milage, as I recall it's much higher.
 

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Somebody should pull the specs on the OEM plugs and see what the manufacturer says - I'd be shocked if it's under 50,000 miles. Also check the European replacement milage, as I recall it's much higher.
The non US to US numbers are higher. I asked about the tune up and valve lash check on our 2k12 n1k since we are getting close to 12k miles (over that now) and the shop said they would do it if I insisted but they don't recommend it.. Not enough miles... He said go by the Europe numbers since I spend most of the time on freeway and 2 lane road (not city driving)..

I'll probably change the air cleaner before it gets too hot out since I do drive on a dirt road and I might as well pull the plugs to see how they look...

~Mark
 

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The non US to US numbers are higher. I asked about the tune up and valve lash check on our 2k12 n1k since we are getting close to 12k miles (over that now) and the shop said they would do it if I insisted but they don't recommend it.. Not enough miles... He said go by the Europe numbers since I spend most of the time on freeway and 2 lane road (not city driving)..

I'll probably change the air cleaner before it gets too hot out since I do drive on a dirt road and I might as well pull the plugs to see how they look...

~Mark

From my investigation, it's the higher amount of sulphur in the fuel in North America that reduces the rated spark plug life and valve adjustment interval.
 

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From my investigation, it's the higher amount of sulphur in the fuel in North America that reduces the rated spark plug life and valve adjustment interval.
That makes sense..

On the s197 mustangs (2005-2009) they use optical sensors for the fuel level and you can get a DTE FLI low code on the dash when the sensors get blind.

The TSB from ford is to put in a bottle on techron to try to clean them and if that doesn't work, replace the sending units...

We have over 300k miles on our Mustang and had the sending unit changed somewhere before 100k miles (warranty) after they tried the TSB. Since the TSB said to add techron (Ford supplied it and put quite a bit in when they tried the TSB) we switched to Chevron fuel (and Shell when no Chevron was available). We haven't had the issue in over 200k miles since the single sending unit was changed.

I wonder if there is a good list somewhere of high versus low sulfur fuels (unleaded, not Diesel) on the 'net. My first quick look didn't find any..

~Mark
 

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I checked the 2014 owner's manual the plugs are NGK 6289 CR9EIA-9 Iridium Spark Plug
Per NKG
NGK's Single Iridium Series Plugs were Designed Specifically for the Performance Enthusiast.

Fine Wire Center Electrode Ensures High Durability and a Consistently Stable Spark
Iridium Alloy has an Extremely High Melting Point, Perfect for Today's High-Tech, High Performance Engines
Trivalent Metal Plating Provides Superior Anti-Corrosion and Anti-Seizing Properties
Corrugated Ribs Prevent Flashover
Pure Alumina Silicate Ceramic Insulator, Provides Superior Strength and Better Heat Transfer
Copper Core Aids in Heat Removal
Triple Seals Prevent Leakage
LONGEVITY: 80-100K
https://www.ngk.com/product.aspx?zpid=9687
 

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Check this from NC Porsche Dealer:

European Performance
5641 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606

911 - (997 since Model Year 2005)
- Engine oil - 20,000 miles
- Spark plugs - 60,000 miles
- Oil-filter element - 20,000 miles
- Air-filter element - 40,000 miles
- Fuel filters - maintenance-free
- Coolant - does not require changing*
 
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