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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a 52 year old male who is 5'10" and 220 pounds. I have longish arms for my upper body (36/37 inches), and 32 inseam. I say this to see if it will help solve my problems.

I've noticed after a few hours riding that my neck and the space between my shoulders hurt. This is bad enough that I feel it for a few hours after riding. I ride about a total of 100 freeway miles to do sporty riding.

I can tell the ergonomics are not right for me, but not sure what I need to make it better. I ready Volfy's thread about the Apex bars and the adjustability, but don't know if a sportier position on the bike will help?
If anyone has gone through this issue and figured it out or has some ideas, please let me know. I appreciate your help.
 

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You can do rearsets, for cheap. These really work after you add a good shift rod. Mine have been on for several months now. The bike shifts better, too. Total rip off of a "real" company. You can interchange the parts with Rizoma. ...the rod is from ebay, and it was 10.00. Outside of pegs and bars, theres not much you can do.

The only other option is free, and might not offer you anything, but If my levers are too high, I have this same issue.
Dropping them down to match my arm angle helps a lot.


 

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I consider myself in pretty good shape, you know the work hard play harder kind of guy. Also ride more then some but less then others so feel I shouldn't get a sore neck. Yet twice l can recall having one and both times it was after a borrowed a helmet to ride that moved around some. Do you noticed the helmet shifting around in the wind?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You can do rearsets, for cheap. These really work after you add a good shift rod. Mine have been on for several months now. The bike shifts better, too. Total rip off of a "real" company. You can interchange the parts with Rizoma. ...the rod is from ebay, and it was 10.00. Outside of pegs and bars, theres not much you can do.

The only other option is free, and might not offer you anything, but If my levers are too high, I have this same issue.
Dropping them down to match my arm angle helps a lot.


Thanks for the information. Rearsets didn't occur to me, but I see how it could change the seating position. I had them on my last bike but had them so long, I forgot what stock felt like.
I will definitely try changing the lever angle. Thanks for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I consider myself in pretty good shape, you know the work hard play harder kind of guy. Also ride more then some but less then others so feel I shouldn't get a sore neck. Yet twice l can recall having one and both times it was after a borrowed a helmet to ride that moved around some. Do you noticed the helmet shifting around in the wind?
Good point. I've been a Shoei guy for decades, but noticed how loud the wind was earlier and yes, my helmet does move around. Maybe you're on to something.
 

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Walking and working out daily helps keep a lot of the pain away for me.
Gets some 10lb dumbells and do different kinda arm workout.
Daily stretching of neck and the rest of the bod can help also.
Also, are you relaxed when riding. Arms lose and not grabbing the handlebars too tightly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Walking and working out daily helps keep a lot of the pain away for me.
Gets some 10lb dumbells and do different kinda arm workout.
Daily stretching of neck and the rest of the bod can help also.
Also, are you relaxed when riding. Arms lose and not grabbing the handlebars too tightly.
Well, I've been pretty active between martial arts, walking and yoga. I had to step back with yoga and karate for obvious reasons. But, I do stretch everyday and take a zoom karate class every week (hate it though). I'm not in tip top shape but I'm certainly not out of shape.
I do tense up with riding and consciously have to loosen up.
The only thing that gets me about it is that I've been riding for decades and this isn't my first bike. But, I've never had neck pain like this
 

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Well, I've been pretty active between martial arts, walking and yoga. I had to step back with yoga and karate for obvious reasons. But, I do stretch everyday and take a zoom karate class every week (hate it though). I'm not in tip top shape but I'm certainly not out of shape.
I do tense up with riding and consciously have to loosen up.
The only thing that gets me about it is that I've been riding for decades and this isn't my first bike. But, I've never had neck pain like this
Ya, my serious neck pain turned out to be the kinda pillow I was using. When riding, make sure your arms are lose by being able to kinda flap your arms with your hands on the grips.
 

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The main purpose for my installing the Apex riser clip-ons was not to correct any ergonomic woes. To be fair, in terms of rider comfort, there isn't anything inherently wrong with the stock handlebar positions. In fact, if my main goal was to optimize the ergos for highway cruising, I would've stayed with the stock bars. The stock bars are angled very similarly to many naked bikes and ADV tourers, which are more for a sit-upright rider posture. Lots of riders find this type of bar position comfortable, particularly for the long haul.

What I wanted was bar angles that are more conducive to engaging the motorcycle in spirited riding mode... that is, shifting body position in the twisties and riding in the tucked position. The differences are not drastic, and I wouldn't call one right or the other wrong. Rather, it's more about which set of compromises the rider prefers.

If you are having comfort problem with the stock riding ergos, the first thing you should be doing is to find and correct any posture errors you may have developed, perhaps unwittingly. cudabob496 is correct... make sure you can arms and shoulders are relaxed while riding. The first lesson taught at level 1 track day is to do the "chicken dance" - going in a straight line, braking into a corner, banked over while in a corner, etc. basically anytime. The only way you can do this, especially with a full-on sportbike, is to support you upper body with your core and your legs, instead of your arms and shoulders.

The 2nd thing you should do is to arch your back forward. This is exactly the same lesson your parents or primary school teacher taught you to do, any time you are standing or sitting. Riding is no different. Evolution has shaped the human spine to support your own weight and absorb shock best when it is arched forward. I look at other motorcyclists on the road, and it amazes me how many get it wrong. Cruiser riders are the worst, especially on those bike with forward control that make them do the folded taco. Curiously, women riders tend to do a much better job at this than men do. Maybe child bearing has taught them how best to carry an extra 30 lbs burden over their belly.

I myself am about to march into my mid-50's and have ridden with guys in their 70's who have no problem riding sport tourers, so age is not a limiting factor. At least not a a bike like the N1k, where you are leaning forward about 15-17deg. That slight forward lean actually helps you offset the wind force hitting you helmet and chest. If anything, I tend to get a stiff neck, after riding a naked bike for long periods, sitting more upright and having to buck the wind.
 

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IMO, this has to do with the slight forward lean and having to "pick your head" up a little. I have a couple herniated disks in my neck and at the beginning of the season I get this same type of pain until I get some miles under my belt. I've considered putting risers on the bike but I like the position as it is. Using resistance bands and doing some head and neck exercises are probably the best solution for this to be honest. I also tried to get a very light helmet as well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The main purpose for my installing the Apex riser clip-ons was not to correct any ergonomic woes. To be fair, in terms of rider comfort, there isn't anything inherently wrong with the stock handlebar positions. In fact, if my main goal was to optimize the ergos for highway cruising, I would've stayed with the stock bars. The stock bars are angled very similarly to many naked bikes and ADV tourers, which are more for a sit-upright rider posture. Lots of riders find this type of bar position comfortable, particularly for the long haul.

What I wanted was bar angles that are more conducive to engaging the motorcycle in spirited riding mode... that is, shifting body position in the twisties and riding in the tucked position. The differences are not drastic, and I wouldn't call one right or the other wrong. Rather, it's more about which set of compromises the rider prefers.

If you are having comfort problem with the stock riding ergos, the first thing you should be doing is to find and correct any posture errors you may have developed, perhaps unwittingly. cudabob496 is correct... make sure you can arms and shoulders are relaxed while riding. The first lesson taught at level 1 track day is to do the "chicken dance" - going in a straight line, braking into a corner, banked over while in a corner, etc. basically anytime. The only way you can do this, especially with a full-on sportbike, is to support you upper body with your core and your legs, instead of your arms and shoulders.

The 2nd thing you should do is to arch your back forward. This is exactly the same lesson your parents or primary school teacher taught you to do, any time you are standing or sitting. Riding is no different. Evolution has shaped the human spine to support your own weight and absorb shock best when it is arched forward. I look at other motorcyclists on the road, and it amazes me how many get it wrong. Cruiser riders are the worst, especially on those bike with forward control that make them do the folded taco. Curiously, women riders tend to do a much better job at this than men do. Maybe child bearing has taught them how best to carry an extra 30 lbs burden over their belly.

I myself am about to march into my mid-50's and have ridden with guys in their 70's who have no problem riding sport tourers, so age is not a limiting factor. At least not a a bike like the N1k, where you are leaning forward about 15-17deg. That slight forward lean actually helps you offset the wind force hitting you helmet and chest. If anything, I tend to get a stiff neck, after riding a naked bike for long periods, sitting more upright and having to buck the wind.
Thanks Volfy
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
IMO, this has to do with the slight forward lean and having to "pick your head" up a little. I have a couple herniated disks in my neck and at the beginning of the season I get this same type of pain until I get some miles under my belt. I've considered putting risers on the bike but I like the position as it is. Using resistance bands and doing some head and neck exercises are probably the best solution for this to be honest. I also tried to get a very light helmet as well.
Thank you.
 

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I am a "senior citizen" & I had a similar neck/shoulder pain problem when I moved over from my ZRX to the N1K. I found it worse when I wore a neck scarf during winter as it would push the back of my helmet up and I would tilt my head more.

I ended up getting a set of Murph's Bar Risers, and they have fixed the problem. And no, I am not related to the owner of Murphs Kits.

https://www.murphskits.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am a "senior citizen" & I had a similar neck/shoulder pain problem when I moved over from my ZRX to the N1K. I found it worse when I wore a neck scarf during winter as it would push the back of my helmet up and I would tilt my head more.

I ended up getting a set of Murph's Bar Risers, and they have fixed the problem. And no, I am not related to the owner of Murphs Kits.

https://www.murphskits.com
Thank you.
 

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Murphy’s risers & Moto works peg lowering kit and most importantly Sargent seat with extra 1 inch of foam added. Without Thea’s add on’s as much as I love the inline 4 power, I would have put it up 4sale!
 

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I am a "senior citizen" & I had a similar neck/shoulder pain problem when I moved over from my ZRX to the N1K. I found it worse when I wore a neck scarf during winter as it would push the back of my helmet up and I would tilt my head more.

I ended up getting a set of Murph's Bar Risers, and they have fixed the problem. And no, I am not related to the owner of Murphs Kits.

https://www.murphskits.com
Did you have any issues installing them. I have a 2021 and it looks tight.
 

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Fitting Murph's bars is straight forward, but on my 2019, the clutch cable & the front brake hose are really a tight fit, especially when you swing the handle bars lock to lock.

There is a thin metal wire guide that "groups" the cables and wiring harness together on each side of the handle bars. It is near to where the handle bars attach to the top triple plate. It is easy to see.

I removed the 2 screws (1 each side) holding the guide in place, then moved the clutch cable and the front brake hose to the outside of the guide, then re-installed the screw holding the guide which holds the remaining electrically cables in place.

This allowed the clutch cable and brake hose to move more freely and this fixed the problem.

The biggest problem in fitting Murph's Bar Risers is getting the handlebar screws out. They are held in place by a lot of high-strength lock-tite. You will not remove them with brute force.

Buy a small butane pencil torch off eBay ($7) or from your local hardware store, and apply the flame directly to the head of the handlebar bolt. After 5 minutes or so, this will soften the lock-tite enough that you can get the bolt loose.

Eye Writing implement Medical equipment Office supplies Hypodermic needle
 

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Perfect, I have ordered in the parts and looking forward to moving the stance back a bit. Thanks again Murphyau!
 
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