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The bad:

1. Not a big fan of the R1 headlights but the styling is otherwise non-offensive.
2. I've never liked the tubular handlebars of the GSXS series, and this one doesn't convince me otherwise. Just cheapens the look of the bike, but again, not horrible.
3. No center stand, but neither does the N1k.

The good:

a. A proper ST subframe... finally.
b. Stock exhaust can that isn't a potato cannon. Looks sleek enough, I might not need aftermarket can.
c. That glorious K5 mill! I like that engine a whole lot better than the N1k.
d. Wide frame-mounted mirrors. Will to see in person, but my guess is very usable.
e. 5gal fuel tank.

This is one bike I've been very interested in ever since Suzi let out the rumors of its existence. It's what the originaly GSX-S1000F shoul've have been. Better later than never. Without a test ride, I'd say it's not spectacular enough for me to want to rush out and trade in my N1k, but it definitely is on top of my shortlist when the time comes.
 
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Suzi has an optional touring screen that has the right contours and coverage. A bike doesn't necessarily need adjustable windscreen, if a fixed screen is designed and tested properly. From the looks of it, I expect this GT's wind protection to have a sizable advantage on the N1k.

 

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Regarding Kawasaki - This is no news, but their TFT display is a small computer with display and bluetooth built in. It would be so freaking ridiculously easy for them to release an OS+Firmware upgrade that would allow for all of what Suzuki appears to offer. Allow for phone AND headset connectivity directly to the dash. I'd definitely pay for a GPS receiver addon if it meant decent navigation directly on the dash too. And all installable by the user via bluetooth connection.

At the same time, it'd also be ridiculously easy for them to just release an 'upgraded' dash meter (free install at a dealer with purchase, since they'd have to transfer over the ODO), complete with wireless Apple Carplay/Android Auto built in, and also navigation and media capable with a memory card slot.

I know I'm dreaming - but dreams are where reality comes from.
1. You are assuming there is an existing programming port on the OEM connector, which in all likelihood isn't there.
2. You are correct that Kawi could've done from the get-go what Suzi did with the GSX-S1000GT. If they chose not to then, what are the chances they will do an about-face and copy Suzi? It'd be basically admitting they f'ed up and that Suzi is better at designing and implementing to the intended demographic's preferences.

I agree that Kawi dropped the ball on Rideology 2yrs ago and will now be playing catch-up. I'm sure they'll eventually come up with Rideology 2.0 on new/updated models. Updating existing instrument panels is unlikely.

Mfrs need to wake up and smell the bit-rate. Smartphone integration is a must, even if some curmudgeons are gonna scream bloody murder. Lots of cars and trucks already do an excellent job with their infotainment systems. I just installed a couple of aftermarket head units in my vehicles and OMG the current state of the art is plain amazing. Understand bikes probably don't need to go nuts on the '-tainment" part of infotainment, but lots of apps can enhance the riding experience and even safety.
 

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It’s not often that I disagree with you, but I do here. First of all, a fixed screen will not fit both a 5’ 3” rider and a 6’ 4” rider. Second, I want wind hitting me in the chest when it’s warmer out, and wind hitting me at least at the top of my helmet in cold weather.

I just took a 14 day, 5,400 mile trip from central Texas to Glacier National Park (and several other parks/mountains), with a lot of temperature changes. I was on my FJR. I raised and lowered the windshield many, many times
Not sure how you read what I wrote, but...

Realistically, the only viable comparisons are amongst similar bikes. I wouldn't compare the GSX-S1000GT to your FJR, any more than I would compared it to my K16GT... or any of the larger and heavier grand tourers. Those have much larger fairings and a motorized screen that is typically much farther forward from the rider. There isn't any fixed screen that'd come close to matching most grand tourer's motorized screen's effectiveness or adjustment range. That would like comparing a Chevy Trax to a Suburban. Sure, they are technical both SUVs, but...

Logic would dictate that comparisons to the GSX-S1000GT are only fair with bikes like the Ninja 1000. Very similar weight, very similar size, very similar ergos, very similar mission. That was what my statement above was referencing: GSX-S1000GT's fixed screen vs. Ninja 1000's "adjustable" screen. Having ridden the Ninja 1000 with several difference screens, I've come to the conclusion that the different positions (really just tilt angles) don't really give the rider a whole lot more versatility. Practically, the only way I can effectively get different wind protection coverage is with a screen change, say, between the Vstream Sport Touring screen and the substantially larger Touring screen. I have both, and do switch between the two for difference seasons.
 
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Actually, when it came out their literature said that some models would have some of those features, such as turn by turn directions. There is no way I believe they came out with it thinking it would only do what it does on the Ninja 1000 SX.

Gee, let’s let them use their phone to program what mode it is in while they are on the toilet. Let’s give them the ability to see where they have already been. And let’s allow a tiny little icon to magically appear on the dash when they just missed a phone call. That’ll really wow them!
When Rideology first was announced, I ask a factory rep at the IMS, what features would Rideology have. He actually mentioned that "turn by turn instructions" thing too. I got excited hearing that and asked: "...so, like it would do similar to what Android Auto and Google Maps would do?" He paused a bit awkwardly, then went to ask another rep for clarification. He then came back and told me it would likely be more of a single text line or short message... followed very quickly by emphasizing "on some models." He explained it would be like if the instrument panel might display a text msg you just got... that sort of messaging.

Anyhow, we talked some more on the subject, and I got the sense that although Kawi intended Rideology to be two-way data comms with smartphone, their emphasis was on data feed from bike to smartphone, not the other way around. My guess is that the project probably grew out of their racing division's datalogger utility, which in turn grew out of the engineering impetus to log real-time operational parameters for analysis. It was very much engineering-centric thinking... not at all user-centric.

My enthusiasm cooled considerable even then. Then later I heard you guys complain about how little it actually does and was not surprised.
 

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This is what I read….

“A bike doesn't necessarily need adjustable windscreen if a fixed screen is designed and tested properly”.

I can’t read it any other way than that you are saying one size and position can fit every rider and every circumstance.
Let's see...

What I wrote:

"Suzi has an optional touring screen that has the right contours and coverage. A bike doesn't necessarily need adjustable windscreen, if a fixed screen is designed and tested properly. From the looks of it, I expect this GT's wind protection to have a sizable advantage on the N1k. "

What you think I meant:

"...one size and position can fit every rider and every circumstance."

I'd say that is a pretty long stretch. I simply opined that a bike could work well with a fixed screen and doesn't necessarily need an adjustable one. The fact that I followed that sentence immediately with mention of the N1k, it should've at the very least hinted at the scope of my comparison. I only mentioned 2 bikes specifically. Nowhere did I expand it to cover all bikes, every rider and every circumstance.

But I concede I could've have explained better. That ball lies squarely in my court.

FWIW, my point was really in regards to the manually adjustable windscreens I see on quite a few bikes that have very little actual practicality. The worst example I've experienced first hand was the Ducati Supersport S. That bikini screen didn't do squat in any of the positions. All it serves is to let Ducati advertise that it has "adjustable windscreen" in order to lend some sport touring credibility.

N1k isn't quite that bad, but my experiences is that Kawi could've save themselves the troubles and just offered optional screen(s), which they do anyway. A lot of us swap screens on bikes like these. Save that weight and complexity, and spend the R&D yen at the wind tunnel, like Suzi did with the GSX-S1000GT.

N1k's screen adjustability necessitated those silly cutouts to avoid clashing with the handlebars at the lowest setting. I suspect much of the aerodynamic woes came from those stupid cutouts. You look at the pic @rcannon409 posted above of a screen that works much better. They did it by pushing the mounting points forward, which allow them to optimize shape/coverage and avoid those pesky cutouts. To a large extent, that appears to be what Suzi tried to accomplish with the GT.
 

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RC, at this point, I wouldn't know whether the GSX-S1000GT fixed screen actually works better until I test ride one first hand. However, what I appreciate most is the fact that Suzi bucked the trend of treating manually adjustable screen as somewhat of a check-list item for a sport touring bike... believing instead that proper work in the wind tunnel bears better fruit. I like that engineering confidence to go left when others all went right with the herd.

Of course manually adjustable screen can work well too. There are ones that have more intricate movements (e.g., shift up and down), rather than just simply tilting the screen. I just don't think Kawi did the best they could with the N1k.
 
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Weight buys you either HP/Torque or touring comfort... or both. I sure hope I'd never have to be forced to choose between a 500 lbs sport tourer and a 700 lbs one. Every time I swap seat from N1k to K16GT, or vise versa, I'm reminded just how nice each one is at the task they are optimized for.
 

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The real question is why it took Suzuki this long to come up with a N1k fighter. The N1k has been around for 10yrs and sold quite well in many parts of the world. The GSX-S1000 trio was a royal waste of dealer floorspace. All they really needed was a naked and a sport tourer. What they have now is what they should've offered back in 2015.

I just hope Honda and Yamaha pay attention and get in on it. With the FJR apparently on the chopping block, Yamaha hopefully has something up its sleeves. The R1/MT10 crossplane would make a great GT engine. I like it even more than the K5.
 

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Agreed that Suzuki was on shaky ground for quite a while. Still, however many R&D ¥ that went into creating both the GSX-S1000F and the Katana could've easily been spent on coming up with a GSX-S1000GT in 2015. It might not have the techie bits it has now for 2022, but neither did N1k at that point. If GSX-S1000F had larger fairings, a better windscreen, and a proper sport touring subframe, I would've bought that instead of N1k and be very happy with it. Heck, they could've called that the Katana... instead of wasting the moniker on yet another also-ran modern retrosport that didn't do anything the naked GSX-S1000 couldn't.

Also agreed there were/are other worthy sport tourers available. Granted, nowhere near as many as these ADVs bleeding out of every mfr's nostrils, but a guy had/have choices. Even Suzuki has the Busa, which can lay as much claim as a GT as any. It suffers from the same high-insurance-premium problem as the ZX14R, but so did the N1k. No bike is perfect. They all have their niggles and gotchas.
 

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Back before I bought the N1k, I seriously considered the wethead R1200RS. 1250 had just come out and were still quite expensive. However, the wethead had already been out for several years and gently used examples were easily found. The RS apparently wasn't that popular so price was fairly reasonable. I found a few in the $10-13k range. Even some in $9k range with bit more miles. I think the 1250 being out also depressed the prices on wethead 1200's. My guess is a lot of these were owned by riders with more than 1 bike, so lots of 2-3yr old ones with barely any miles on them. Maybe not exactly the same price range of the N1k, but close enough for me to cross shop.

I also looked at the Ducati Supersport. While it's not quite a bona fide sport tourer, it would've been a fine gentlman's sportbike, which is really what I bought the N1k for. Lot's of examples in the similar $11-14k range. To a similar degree the GSX-S1000F also falls into this category. Slap a top case on it, and it could easily serve the same purpose the N1k does for me. Those can be found cheap, some dipping into the $6k range.

Not saying these are competing head-on with N1k. They have different specs and target different demographics, but there is some overlap with N1k. Not everybody buys the N1k to do exactly the same types of riding, so depending on the buyer's intended use, there are other bikes that might make sense.
 
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I very nearly got a Ducati Supersport. The base model isn't that far off in price from the N1K, but there's just too make things that make the Supersport lackluster by comparison. It's way down on power and has crappy OEM luggage. And once you start adding accessories that the N1K comes with stock, the price skyrockets. I really want to own a Ducati, but I just couldn't justify it over the N1K. And I think that's the N1K's greatest success. It's an incredible value for the money. Hopefully the new Suzuki can match that part as well.
I was okay with its power, but the mirrors were basically useless at hwy speeds. The adjustable bikini screen is a joke. Still, I do think it has the making of a good gentleman's sportbike that can occasional do a short tour. Ducati needs to pump a good bit more refinement into it before I'd buy.
 
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I rarely pay any attention to what the MSRP is for a particular bike/car I'm considering buying. Mfrs can set whatever MSRP they want, but the market conditions will dictate the selling price. Depending on how (un)popular the vehicle is, and as is the case right now, the availability/rarity, actual selling price can vary wildly, even for brand new stock. I don't think I've ever bought a brand new vehicle that wasn't discounted $thousands.

Right now OTOH, supply is tight and prices are high. It's not uncommon to see "market adjustment" explicitly added to the MSRP. For some vehicles, that can be $10k or more. Unless you absolutely need to buy a vehicle right now, it's best to wait. Looks like it might be at the very least a few more months, potentially far longer, before stock levels and pricing recover back to pre-shortage levels.
 

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If I try that here when I get my booster, it would be my luck that the provider will not get the joke, take offense to it, report me to the authorities, and have me thrown in County lockup for harassment.

This COVID thing has too many people on edge and hair trigger. I'm playing nice.
 
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