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So my saddlebags come with a warning of "max speed 130kmph". Is this one of those recommendations like the gearing shifting speeds in the manual or does hte bike get a little unstable with the bags at higher speeds?
 

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They can. They might, or could. That's the fun part. Depending on the load, your weight, wind, fuel tank level....Most of the time it's a non issue, but that's not always true.
 

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'12 Ninja 1000 (w/ late model KQR panniers), 03 KTM 525 EXC
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110 mph, loaded with battery tender, hat, couple bottles of water, panniers never left the bike.
 

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Had the panniers loaded with clothes, toiletries , comfy walking shoes, small tool kit and my CPAP machine. Coming back from a trip me and my friend hit a section of interstate on a weekend with very light traffic. Cracked on the throttle for a brief run. 135 mph indicated. The bike was rock solid and I still have both the panniers:D

David
 

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110 mph, loaded with battery tender, hat, couple bottles of water, panniers never left the bike.
Same - never had an issue, care, or concern that they were gna fly off. Totally secure.
 

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I don't have bags for my Ninja, but my c14 has them. The worst I ever had was a weave that happened around 170. I had an oversized windshield and the bags might have had 15 lbs in them. Total of 30 lbs.

What was interesting was how the weave developed. The weave would appear at 170, but 168 was no problem. It was interesting because of how specific it was, and how sudden it's appearance was. Nothing was scary and it didn't feel dangerous.

Adding rebound damping helped. The real solution was the smaller, stock windshield.
 

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If you look up Revzilla on U2b, they raced a bunch of bikes including a Ninja 1000 with bags. For the straight line race, one of them came off at 100+.
That was a great video. The funny thing was the bike topped out at 156 mph (GPS indicated) with one pannier on:D. They found the bag and snapped it back on (Givi makes some tough hard cases) and when Zack made a second run the bike slowed to a GPS indicated 152 mph.
 

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If you look up Revzilla on U2b, they raced a bunch of bikes including a Ninja 1000 with bags. For the straight line race, one of them came off at 100+.
They also said it came off because it wasn't properly attached in the first place. As Retired Dog Catcher said, after it was attached properly it stayed solid at 150+.

Personally, I've seen 115 mph with the cases and had no issues at all.
 

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They also said it came off because it wasn't properly attached in the first place. As Retired Dog Catcher said, after it was attached properly it stayed solid at 150+.
When I'm paying attention it's almost impossible to get the cases on wrong. The key to that is 'paying attention'. I have put the right one on wrong twice. Once at the dealer after the sales guy showed me how to do it, that was funny. And then about 2 weeks later. And each time it was a b!tch getting the thing off to remount it correctly. Maybe if I do that dumb trick again I'll just go out and make a fast run to get it off!!
 

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Any time I enter the triple digit area I can definitely tell the bags are there. Nothing really negative like weave or head shake but there's a bit of buffeting that's not there without the luggage.

MY limit (as opposed to the bike's limit) is about 125mph. Much above that some app in the back of my brain kicks in and reminds me that my old reflexes could not handle any issue in time to avoid disaster. Even at 75 when the doe jumped out in front of me yesterday near Mt. Rainier it was a heart racing big pucker moment. There's a quite a difference between a practiced panic stops and real panic stops in body physiology and after effects! I don't remember if the fully loaded bags pushed me or not.

Disclaimer: No deer were hit nor bikes damaged in the re-creation of this experience. (but it does raise my heart rate a bit. :) )
 

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Even at 75 when the doe jumped out in front of me yesterday near Mt. Rainier it was a heart racing big pucker moment. There's a quite a difference between a practiced panic stops and real panic stops in body physiology and after effects! I don't remember if the fully loaded bags pushed me or not.
+1 and +2 and +3


On my few trips to Mexico, I had half loaded bags up to 180 MPH several times without issue. No noticeable drag or buffeting.
Was that 180 down a steep hill?
 

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My H2 SX easily made it to 180. 190 is hard. 200 is impossible without lots of mods
Sorry I missed that you were replying to @Energydrinkvape question about your H2. Is the 190 with or without the bags? Have you had the opportunity to run it at higher elevations say 9-10K feet and how much difference did you notice?
 

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She's long gone now. I got sick of the insurance. I don't think it would hit 190 with bags. It's hard enough.

I did many trips up the in Sierra's in California up to around 8000 feet. I never even noticed a power difference, but I was not pushing hard other than in the crazy amount of corners.
 

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I ride in the 5000-6000 ft elevation most of the time. Sometimes up to 8000-9000 at the ski resorts. On occasion, I'll get to go down to the 1500 ft level.

A turbo powered machine isn't as sensitive to the high altitude . When I am at those lower elevations, the bike responds better. There's more power. On a 150 HP bike, I'm looking at 130-135. A pretty decent loss, and the loss is through the entire powerband.

Top speed is interesting because the bike makes less power, but the air is a little thinner, so no major changes.

You really notice it in compact cars. Although these have enough power, at sea level, when you get up to he resorts it feels like you need pedals to assist and you would never dare pass anyone.
 
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'12 Ninja 1000 (w/ late model KQR panniers), 03 KTM 525 EXC
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I ride in the 5000-6000 ft elevation most of the time. Sometimes up to 8000-9000 at the ski resorts. On occasion, I'll get to go down to the 1500 ft level.

A turbo powered machine isn't as sensitive to the high altitude . When I am at those lower elevations, the bike responds better. There's more power. On a 150 HP bike, I'm looking at 130-135. A pretty decent loss, and the loss is through the entire powerband.

Top speed is interesting because the bike makes less power, but the air is a little thinner, so no major changes.

You really notice it in compact cars. Although these have enough power, at sea level, when you get up to he resorts it feels like you need pedals to assist and you would never dare pass anyone.
God I love forced induction. It's funny you mention the thing about elevation. With the EFI it's atleast able to lean out the mixture a bit for the elevation change. Carbed? It's funny, going up in elevation usually means for my old riding area, cooler temps. Thing would almost run the same but not quite.

Used my panniers yesterday loaded to 25-30 lbs each. Think that exceeds the load limit(?)
Got up to 90 mph (oops, thanks Ivan for making this thing a rocketship) and bags stayed on without issue...
 
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