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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have any of you had issues connecting to and reading the ECU with an OBD2 scanner? I've got two - an OBDLink MX Bluetooth module and an Innova handheld. Both work fine on cars and my BMW F800, and work with apps I have on my phone and tablet PC. I got the diagnostic port to OBD adapter cable today - both scanners sense the ignition on/off, and both try but can't connect to the ECU on my 2019 ZX1000WKF.

So here's the REAL issue. I recently had my ECU flashed by 2 Wheel DynoWorks, and I've had issues ever since I got it back. The main issue I'm trying to troubleshoot is error code 43, (injector #3 error) but I can't clear it. Here's the kicker - there's nothing wrong with injector #3. I know this because it works just fine and the engine purrs upon startup when the fuel mixture is rich. Then once I'm out riding and the engine is fully up to temp, the injector starts cutting in/out. I never had this issue prior to the 2WDW ECU flash. Could it be a flaky fuel injector that doesn't behave well when the fuel mapping leans out due to the revised ECU flash? Sure, but I doubt it.

What I don't understand is WHY I can't read the ECU to check the codes, and I'm wondering if that's something that 2WDW did in the flash. I asked them about taking it to a Kawi dealer since it's still under warranty and asked about date stamps on the flash, etc. that the dealer could see. This is what came out of that discussion: "They (the dealership) can't tell whether or not the ECU has been flashed unless they plug into it with the specific flashing software from Woolich. There are no flash counters in these ECUs like there are on modern automotive ECUs." Anyway, I'm starting to get really aggravated because I HAVE checked everything I can short of lifting the tank to get at the injectors, but I don't see a need to do that since the engine purrs when the fuel mixture is rich on cold start. I'm really just PO'd that I can't scan the ECU and reset the code, and I want to know if that's a Kawi issue or something I should pursue with 2WDW. At this point, I'm ready to send the ECU back to 2WDW and have them reverse whatever they did. Grrrrrrr.
 

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I wouldnt reverse the flash. Others have the 2wdw flash and havent had this issue.

You removed your ecu, sent it in, and plugged it back in. You know how many wires went to the ecu plug. Isnt there 20 of them? Or more?

Go to section 3, page 92 in the manual. It shows exactly what pins are involved regarding injector 3, and the ecu. It's possible that the pin is loose and never made an excellent connection when you replaced the ecu.

Even if you dont have a meter, you could look at the connection. Loose pins make sense.

Kawasaki dealers use a computer program called "KDS". Kawasaki diagnostic system...something like that. It's best feature is programming key FOBs, and tire sensors for a concours 14. Theres no way that system sees your flash. Notice how kds is referred to , clear back in 2007. It's nothing like we have, for cars. Its VERY basic.

The part that would get you caught is a sticker on the ecu. Peel that off and you are good to go. If it turned into a federal case, and your ecu was sent to Kawasaki, sure, they could find it, but a local dealer wouldnt even have the tools to look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Loose pins don't make sense. I'll give you some background. I'm an engineer and formerly an engineering tech in the Aerospace/Weapons industry, and I've built, rebuilt, and bugged out more high-tech cables than I care to admit. Far more complex cables than anything you'd find on a car or motorcycle. Trust me, I've checked everything that can be checked, and there are no female pins backed out of either ECU connector backshell. Those are environmental connectors designed to do two things - withstand vibration and maintain a positive connection. That's why the pins are so long - you have to seat that female connector a half-inch onto the male before it locks, providing nearly a half-inch of surface connection for each male/female pin. The female pins positively seat in the backshell with a click-stop, and there's enough strain relief on those wire bundles where a female pin won't back out or lose connection unless something is seriously messed up, in which case I'm experienced enough with these situations to know if that's occurred. It hasn't.

I rode the bike for 300 miles today at different temperatures (early morning through the late afternoon) and different elevations (below 5000' to above 7000'). Injector #3 was misfiring or not firing at all for the morning half of the trip - temps in the '60s at a higher elevation. After meeting a riding buddy for lunch, taking a different route at lower elevations with temps in the high 80's, injector #3 was just fine. No misfiring, full power in all gears. I also need to mention I worked at Ford Powertrain division when they were developing the Duratec engine. I do know about engines, too. I suspect the ECU tune 2WDW developed was perfected near sea level, in a humid climate, given their shop is in Kirkland, WA. This leads me to believe that the thinner, mile-high dry air in New Mexico, is different enough that it wasn't factored into their fuel mapping. I believe that ECU tune isn't working as well for me because it's too lean for my environmental conditions. I also have a stock air intake, stock exhaust, and therefore no factory sensor deletes. I don't know how their "stock setup" tune works with the factory sensors.

None of the problems I'm experiencing with the engine were happening before the 2WDW ECU tune, and that's the common denominator. There is such a thing as troubleshooting ghosts, and I shouldn't be having intermittent problems that didn't exist prior to this one change. There's not a large enough body of evidence in the Kawasaki forums to deduce that the ECU tune worked for others and therefore should work for me. I count less than 10 people in the Ninja forum who actually have a 2WDW flash, and none have the 2019 model. I'm inclined to return to the factory tune.
 

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What you say makes sense. I had no idea what your background was. It didnt sound like you were coming from a strong, technical background, so sorry if that was talking down to you about the pins. Y The only part that doesnt is why you see an error as specific as injector 3. You also had traction control issues, too? Or, am I thinking of someone else?

By 2019, 99% of the Ninja 1000 owners sent their ecu to Ivan, but 3 wheel did a lot of 2017 bikes. 10? I dont know, but there were some on Facebook as well. No one who did the research would seek out 2 wheel over Ivan. The quality just isnt there.

The bike doesnt have anything about it that would know if it was running rich, lean or perfect. The O2 sensor is only active at low, rpm and then its active for a very limited time. A good flash shuts it off, but with your flash, who knows?

No one messes with Kawasakis altitude compensation programs. Those have been used since 2004, or earlier, without issue.

Did you look at the manual? It wont let me cut and paste. If you look at the full description of your error, it finishes with "communication with the O2 sensor". Could it be that simple?
 

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The other problem here is, the rich/lean idea.

Let's say we took any motorcycle, 2 stroke, 4 stroke, 2 cylinder, single, or six cylinder. Any and all of them.

Let's say I have efi and I'm on the Atlantic City Boardwalk and its 66 degrees. I set the fuel tables to be 100% perfect for my condition. At this point, I shut off Kawasakis altitude/temperature program that's in the ecu.

If I take this bike to a warm, dry environment , its going to run rich. Not lean. So, this is where you start to make sense.

The bike gets to New Mexico. When I sensed the atmospheric conditions (elevation, warm) the bike runs Kawasakis program and makes itself too lean, based on the "leaner" settings that may, or may not have been changed in the ECU's reflash.

Theres no way a tuner would ever send out a mail order flash that was pushing the limit of lean. I know the flash isnt excellent. The software is limited, the tuner is as good as anyone. Honestly, hes probably in the top group of USA tuners. He wouldnt send something out that wasnt safe, u der any condition.

But, let's say he did screw up and do this. At that point you woukd have symptoms of a lean running motorcycle. Possibly hard to start, white spark plugs, stumble on acceleration, higher operating temps.

The bike coukd be aware of this, during that specific area of the rpm chart where the O2 sensor was active. I'm not going to specify where that is. Its low rpm, and for a short duration. If it were too lean, in this very specific area, the error would be 11, 12, 13 , and almost for sure 67. It would have no idea if cylinder 3, specifically, was a problem unless injector 3 was doing something it wasnt supposed to be doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I apologize for living up to my UncleSalty name - people have called me that for years. OK, here's what's going on, covering all my forum posts to date. I'm smart enough to know what I don't know, and learned a few things along the way, like, how to accept that some of the things I'm seeing aren't happening for the reasons I assumed.

1) Bad adapter cable. The OBD2 adapter cable I bought from eBay was miswired. My scanners would sense power, but not connect to the ECU. I returned that and ordered an adapter from Amazon that 50+ people said worked. It works. Problem solved.

2) A hard FI code failure, like the P0203 (as I can now read on both of my OBD2 scanners) or #43 Fuel Injector #3 malfunction, wiring open or short. This throws the CEL light and WILL cause KTRC/Power Mode to flash continuously until the error code is cleared. I DID NOT expect this. I assumed that the CEL indicator worked independently of the KTRC/Power Mode indicator. Another aspect that confused me was as long as the CEL is illuminated and the KTRC/Power Mode indicator flashed, I couldn't even reset the clock, but I could toggle through the odometer, trip counters, fuel consumption, outside temp, etc. Look, I get it. The designers at Kawasaki REALLY want us to pay attention to that CEL and get it fixed. But these aren't fighter jets or commercial aircraft where many lives are at stake, and unrelated cockpit/dash indicators should remain independent. I shouldn't have to think that a KTRC/Power Mode problem may exist just because the engine threw a hard FI code and illuminated the CEL. And why tie the clock to that? Jesus. This is just a poorly thought-out error code system, and overkill. Human factors, ergonomics - keep it simple. I think like a pilot, and if an indicator for a specific system is telling me something, IT'S FOR THAT SYSTEM. So I got a little distracted and disturbed with the KTRC/Power Mode indicator flashing because I DIDN'T know if a problem existed there, too, OR if the KTRC settings were even active at that point.

3) The wiring on my bike is fine, and I was seriously overthinking the 2WDW ECU flash. I've shared many emails with 2WDW, and now I understand their process, configuration management, and quality control. None of this, as I now believe, is due to their ECU flash. Once I got the correct OBD2 adapter cable and was able to clear the CEL, I could toggle through all the KTRC/Power modes and reset the clock. I was able to get the #3 Injector to throw the error code in both cold start and full temp conditions, regardless of KTRC/Power Mode settings, proving none of that is related in any way to my aggressive riding style.

4) I've been riding with my Bluetooth OBD2 scanner plugged in for the past two days. On both rides, the CEL fired when Injector #3 started burping a few minutes into each ride. After pulling over and resetting the error code, the injector settles out, and I rode for many hours after each reset without throwing the CEL. So, I am in agreement with the staff at 2WDW that I have a textbook flaky injector, and it's NOT their tune. They even offered to check the ECU on a test bike to satisfy my concerns. Anyway, I have a service appointment on the Ninja in a few weeks, and I'm going to do a cold start, wait for the injector to flake out and throw a code, and then park it until I take it in for service so the shop can have the code as a starting point. I'll explain to the shop how intermittent and sometimes dangerous the injector issue is, how long it's been happening, and insist I want the injector replaced.

5) I've put nearly 600 miles on the bike since I had the suspension tuned two weeks ago, and I'm riding the bike harder and faster than ever. All of the confusion I had about the KTRC intervention in past posts has been alleviated. With the front & rear suspension dialed in, this bike is rock solid in turns now, and the KTRC system rarely comes into play or intervenes.

6) Finally, Kawasaki made a lousy choice with the Bridgestones that come stock with this bike. This is the sport-touring Ninja - emphasis on sport. But seriously, I don't even have 4,700 miles on this bike and I've practically got a slick. With side cases and my weight, that's a minimum 225lb load. These tires are not meant for touring mileage. New rubber is coming soon.

UncleSalty (Jim)
 

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6) Finally, Kawasaki made a lousy choice with the Bridgestones that come stock with this bike. This is the sport-touring Ninja - emphasis on sport. But seriously, I don't even have 4,700 miles on this bike and I've practically got a slick. With side cases and my weight, that's a minimum 225lb load. These tires are not meant for touring mileage. New rubber is coming soon.

UncleSalty (Jim)
The problem with every tyre (yes that is ho you spell it in English :) ) that comes on your new bike is the OEM part - It would not be so bad if you got the full retail release of the tyre but the OEM version is made to a price. Even on cars I have never had the OEM tyre last anywhere near as long as the second set of tyres. Having said that I still agree that a "Hypersport" tyre is the wrong choice from factory on these.

Interestingly on the newly released Kawasaki website the Ninja 1000 is now a "Sport" bike not a sports touring or supersport as before

Tire Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire
 

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Stock tires are like those "reduced capacity" toner cartridges that come with brand new printers.

Motorcycle mfrs put these S20/S21 on as OEM tires so as to provide a good first impression for handling. No incentive for them to last thousands of miles. Rider preferences run the gamut anyway, and no tire would be absolutely perfect for every rider.

Anyhow, back to orginal topic... the adapter cable I bought off Amazon worked great right out of the box. Is this the diagnostic port?
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Anyhow, back to orginal topic... the adapter cable I bought off Amazon worked great right out of the box. Is this the diagnostic port?
Yes, that's the diagnostic port. The adapter cable I bought from eBay, coded and labeled for Kawasaki 6-pin ports, was identical to the one I replaced it with from Amazon. The eBay product (there were too many vendors to choose from) was miswired or mislabeled, either way, I received a refund.
 
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