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I had a 60 on the front of my sv650 when it was purchased. It felt strange. Even not knowing what the bike should feel like, you knew the 60 was not right.
 

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The Ninja 1000 goes squirmy and squishy if I drop tyre pressure below 32/38. I have never been to the track but we have twisties only 30 minutes ride away and the bike feels at its happiest with tyre pressure close to Kawasaki recommended pressure, maybe drop 2 psi front and rear for the twisties and 4 psi for track. I wouldn't go below that. The bike just does not respond to rider inputs very well if you drop tyre pressure to to the level track riders usually do. I have used the Metzeler M7RR and Michelin Pilot Power 3 tyres on my Ninja.

My riding is fast and aggressive.
The track is very different.
I agree that on the street, the stock pressures on this bike are best. I find my '14 to get very unsettling if I let the rear get under 39 cold, and it really is happiest at 42/36 cold (for me). But the track is a whole different story. You'll get far more heat in the tires on the track, and 29/31 feels great at a reasonably fast track pace on this bike. A good suspension guy will check your tire temps (At the track days I've done, it's usually Dave Moss) at the track and adjust accordingly, and for me, that always ends up being 29/31.

The best answer for the track is to find the suspension guy (most track days have them). Have them adjust your setup, and come back to them throughout the day. They'll read your tires and adjust as appropriate. Your pace, weight and track/ambient temps are all big factors in the correct track pressure. There's really too many variables for a one size fits all pressure answer.

For ME, at the tracks I ride at (Laguna Seca, Sears Point, Buttonwillow), and my weight (180lbs), and pace (Fast side of B group) and ambient temps in the 80's, usually using Bridgestone S21s, 29/31 cold usually works best on a '14 Ninja 1000.

My same bike at a fast street pace on typical sport touring tires (Metzler Roadtec 01s or Michelin PR 3/4/5) 42/36 cold works best.
 

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Thanks for the response. After some thought, I’ve decided on getting the Q3 plus. I mainly use my bike for joy rides and mountain rides in Colorado, as such I don’t put many miles on it but enjoy the confidence a good set of tires give me. Tbh I thought the oem were perfectly acceptable for my pace in the streets, which is calm but slightly faster then needed.

After a quick inspection on my tires, I don’t think they’ll give me what I need for the track day. I wanted to save a few dollars for the Q3 but revzilla only had the 60 for the front. Someone mentioned $300 is a lot cheaper then fixing a new bike, as such, I’ve decided not to be a cheap ******* and buy the Q3+. I’ m exited but I did have to delay the track day until I can get my tires fitted.
Awesome! You'll love these tires. The front end feel will be night and day compared to OE. Incredible grip as well!

The OE tires were "ok" on the street as long as you didn't push the bike. As soon as I started being a little more aggressive, I got this numb feeling from the front end and at certain speeds, it felt like the bike "fell over". Not confidence inspiring at all.
 

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The track is very different.
I agree that on the street, the stock pressures on this bike are best. I find my '14 to get very unsettling if I let the rear get under 39 cold, and it really is happiest at 42/36 cold (for me). But the track is a whole different story. You'll get far more heat in the tires on the track, and 29/31 feels great at a reasonably fast track pace on this bike. A good suspension guy will check your tire temps (At the track days I've done, it's usually Dave Moss) at the track and adjust accordingly, and for me, that always ends up being 29/31.

The best answer for the track is to find the suspension guy (most track days have them). Have them adjust your setup, and come back to them throughout the day. They'll read your tires and adjust as appropriate. Your pace, weight and track/ambient temps are all big factors in the correct track pressure. There's really too many variables for a one size fits all pressure answer.

For ME, at the tracks I ride at (Laguna Seca, Sears Point, Buttonwillow), and my weight (180lbs), and pace (Fast side of B group) and ambient temps in the 80's, usually using Bridgestone S21s, 29/31 cold usually works best on a '14 Ninja 1000.

My same bike at a fast street pace on typical sport touring tires (Metzler Roadtec 01s or Michelin PR 3/4/5) 42/36 cold works best.

Interesting inputs, thanks. Like I mentioned, I haven't been to the track (yet) so I would be interested to understand whether tyre pressure varies with one's suspension set-up (on the track). I have modded my bike's suspension through Traxxion Dynamics (Penske 8983 at the rear and AK-20 kit at the front). I am also running Rotobox Carbon Fibre 300ST wheels on my Ninja. The suspension and the wheels upgrade have transformed my bike. Reducing unsprung mass allows the suspension even more freedom to keep the bike planted at all speeds and over all surfaces. Anyway, I digress... my question relates to whether tyre pressure (on track) needs to account for the suspension tune that you're running.
 

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For those who want to go to the track - Figure about a 6-7 psi change from the heat the track riding will put in. This means go out for your first season (which you should go easy in anyways) with the goal of having the tires at the recommended cold pressures when you come in. Speaking of which, take your gear off and immediately take your pressures. If the bike is feeling squirmy, chances are the pressures are too high. Let out enough to get back to the recommended cold temps ONLY, and then check again after the next session. You should get to a point where you don't need to touch pressures again for the rest of the day.

I found that on my gsxr, I needed to get both tires to 35-36 as a final pressure in the garage after the session. To do this, I had to start the day at 29. If I did that, so long as it wasn't a super hot or super cold day, I'd check them after coming in from session 1, and they'd be perfect. I'd check them again after session 2 or 3 depending on feel and usually end up letting 1 or 2psi out of them and then that was it for the day.


- Always go easy lap 1, and then slowly pick up your pace the second lap. By the 3rd la your tires should be "there"
- If the tires start to feel greasy, take it easy, and check pressures when you come in. There almost always racers, instructors or a suspension guy at track days - go use him, talk to them, even if it costs ya 20 bucks.
- These bikes are heavy and may put more heat into the tires...
 
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Interesting inputs, thanks. Like I mentioned, I haven't been to the track (yet) so I would be interested to understand whether tyre pressure varies with one's suspension set-up (on the track). I have modded my bike's suspension through Traxxion Dynamics (Penske 8983 at the rear and AK-20 kit at the front). I am also running Rotobox Carbon Fibre 300ST wheels on my Ninja. The suspension and the wheels upgrade have transformed my bike. Reducing unsprung mass allows the suspension even more freedom to keep the bike planted at all speeds and over all surfaces. Anyway, I digress... my question relates to whether tyre pressure (on track) needs to account for the suspension tune that you're running.
No matter what setup you have, hot tire pressure should only depend on the type of tire and track surface to some degree. The cold pressure will obviously vary a bit.
 

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I watch with interest. Everyone's pressures look super high to me, but on the other hand I've never rode a bike this heavy at the track.

In any case, good advice is to work your way up to speed slowly over the course of a few sessions and inspect your tires immediately off the track.

Getting pressure advice from others or trying to judge from their feel is one thing but really the better thing to do is to read the look of your tires. The fact is, I don't even need to know the pressure of my tires, but I do know if I need to add or remove some air just by reading the tire. (maybe a half lb at a time)

I recommend studying the videos of Dave Moss. Learn to read your tires not just for optimal pressure but for suspension issues also. (or pay someone to do it for you) or maybe just ride over to the tire guy after your session to see what he thinks.

Sport touring or street oriented tires tend to get a "sandy beach" look when running at the right pressure. finding some samples in my pics:


Higher performance sporting or race tires tend to get little rubber globules that roll up to edge. An example of that:


Initially to get there everyone needs to identify cold tearing, hot tearing and various levels of overheating. But especially cold tearing, because that can wreck tires really fast. Measure cold then hot. If you find something that works, measure hot, then cold again when you get home so you know your starting point if you don't use warmers.

Keep a notepad and take note of changes as temp changes through the day. For all my tires at the track I have sets of data from 50 degrees up to 100 degrees in increments of 10 degrees. In Wisconsin I pretty much have to start low in the cool mornings and add air through the day a couple times so my tires don't overheat in the afternoon.

Once again, Dave Moss. He's got a video out there that's an hour long all about reading tires, Look it up, it's good stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks all for the valuable info on tire pressures. This track day will be a first with such a heavy machine and last time I did one was in 2013 I believe with a Ninja 300.

I went to cyclegear to pick up a set of Q3+ but I couldn’t pass up on a sale deal for Bridgestone BT016, never heard of the tires but a quick look in the interwebz told me they should do fine. I got the set at $180!!! So it was hard to pass up. Next conundrum came at installing said tires, I’ve never taken the wheels apart on this bike but it was relatively straight forward. I wanted everything done before this Sunday so I can take it to the track.

Now, I ordered up some tools from revzilla having watched the tire changing video and having some confidence to do it. Let me tell ya, it was a very difficult task to get that dang tire on the rim. I finally got the front in there but the bead would not seat and during the process one of the tire irons hit me right in the forehead. I was as frustrated with the process as anyone could be so I let the shop do it. Now I can see the benefit in having a tire changing machine, as installing both tires (off the rim mind you) cost me $79.

Anyways, tires are on the bike and I took it for a test ride and all seems fine. I’m exited, nervous and happy for this day to come. I hope to have a suspension guy there at the track but we’ll see.
 

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Wow carbon fiber wheels on a N1K! I think you might be crazy... but I am very jealous :)
Did you notice I also got...

G&G Moto2 exhaust cans + Akrapovic exhaust header
Rapid Bike Evo fuel controller + YouTune module
BMC filter
Traxxion Dynamics front forks kit + Penske mono-shock
Hyperpro RSC Steering Damper
Rotobox Carbon Fibre 300ST Wheels
Brembo 19RCS Corsa Corta master cylinder
HEL steel-braided brake lines

Good time to get just a little bit jealous, maybe :smile:
 

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Wow carbon fiber wheels on a N1K! I think you might be crazy... but I am very jealous /forum/images/smilies/smile.gif
Did you notice I also got...

G&G Moto2 exhaust cans + Akrapovic exhaust header
Rapid Bike Evo fuel controller + YouTune module
BMC filter
Traxxion Dynamics front forks kit + Penske mono-shock
Hyperpro RSC Steering Damper
Rotobox Carbon Fibre 300ST Wheels
Brembo 19RCS Corsa Corta master cylinder
HEL steel-braided brake lines

Good time to get just a little bit jealous, maybe
A little my hinny. DAMN!!
 

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Yes but the 4K in wheels is what stood out :)


Did you notice I also got...

G&G Moto2 exhaust cans + Akrapovic exhaust header
Rapid Bike Evo fuel controller + YouTune module
BMC filter
Traxxion Dynamics front forks kit + Penske mono-shock
Hyperpro RSC Steering Damper
Rotobox Carbon Fibre 300ST Wheels
Brembo 19RCS Corsa Corta master cylinder
HEL steel-braided brake lines

Good time to get just a little bit jealous, maybe :smile:
 

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To Zaph's point: Dave Moss is the man!

He is a west coast guy but will travel (if you have enough paying bodies at an event).

He will also do Skype sessions to help you set up remotely. He helped me with my initial baseline on the R1.. If you think you know anything about suspension and tires.. Dave know's more! He is legendary!
 

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I've been watching his youtube channel and more recently, has become more for "pay." I don't blame him though, why should he do it for free.

How did his Skype session workout? was he patient in setting guiding you to set it up?
 

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Damn... The excellent 2 hour long tire wear video that I remember from Dave Moss is no longer available. Yeah I guess he's going for more on the pay side. That's too bad but I can understand trying to make a living out of it. If he comes to your track and offers some services, go for it.

I watched that video about 4 times and learned so much.
 

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Bikram, we need more pics of your bike. I don't think we have seen the wheels, yet.

Plus, the backgrounds you use are always cool.
 

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I haven't used him for an online session (YET). He gave me the initial settings on my bike for free.. he put in 2-3 paragraphs of extremely bike specific knowledge into that email so I compensated him. I think if you are going to do an online you are going to need a buddy or a wheel chock.. I had neither. I think to maximize his efforts.. I learn a lot more about the bike so I can give him good feedback about what it is doing on the track (not that he wouldn't be able to tell me just by looking at it)... He is worth every penny for me and if you get a chance to work with him for what is essentially pocket change DO IT!!!
 

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I like the online idea. It's worth paying for good knowledge, like that. Plus,MIT also helps people get over that fear of "messing it up"
 

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Bikram, we need more pics of your bike. I don't think we have seen the wheels, yet.

Plus, the backgrounds you use are always cool.
Hello RC! Attaching some pics readily available on my phone. You can spot the CF wheels by Rotobox, the HyperPro RSC steering damper, the You Tune module from Rapid Bike (mounted next to the right side bar switchgear), Akrapovic headers (no ‘breadbox’ beneath the bike), the G&G cans, etc. The pic of me riding the bike is for the background you mentioned :smile:
 

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