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Agree. I put Knight Design lowering pegs on mine that gave some relief at the expense of a little ground clearance. I also transferred them over to my 1000SX when I traded for it, which I also find a little cramped.
Do they make enough of a difference? I've been ready to pull the trigger on a pair for my CBR a couple of times then thought they wouldn't do enough. Perhaps a set of risers and the pegs together would transform it, but I get this funny feeling that it won't really do enough...for me anyway.
 

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'20 Kawasaki 1000SX, '18 KTM Super Duke R, '16 Yamaha FJR1300ES
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Do they make enough of a difference? I've been ready to pull the trigger on a pair for my CBR a couple of times then thought they wouldn't do enough. Perhaps a set of risers and the pegs together would transform it, but I get this funny feeling that it won't really do enough...for me anyway.
They work great for me. You wouldn't think that a 1 3/8" drop would make that much difference in legroom comfort, but it does.
 
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+1. I switched to helibars on my 2010 VFR1200F and didn't like them. When I replaced the 2010 with a 2012, I kept the stock clip-on's.

Sitting on the H2-SX, the ergos felt very similar to the VFR1200F. That is one thing I liked about it. Although not having ridden one, I can't be certain of that.

GSX-S1000GT's handlebars look very much like the N1k's - kinda tallish and more of less straight across with little drop and sweep. Unlike the N1k, the tubular handlebar won't be as easy to replace with something that can be fine-tuned (like the Apex clip-ons).
I think tube bars are way easier/cheaper to fix than clip-ons and I prefer their aesthetics even though the look dated today.
 
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I had the knight designs on for a week and yanked them. They pushed my feet way too far out.
Yep, an inch and a half drop is a big amount (unless your knees are toast) but any more spread sideways is intolerable for me as well. I can bend my knees all day but I absolutely cannot handle my feet being spread apart, it's painful on the sides of my groin and ruins my ride.
 

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Jazook, as a free experiment, try unbolting the rubber cover off of your stock pegs. Don't ride much, like that, as the peg is slippery. Notice how much of a difference that is. 1 3/8 might as well be a mile in this context.
 

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If you're not vain, some of the new "ADV style" bikes are fantastic road bikes for folks who can't bend their knees. With the tall seat, the bars fixed, a little suspension work and good street rubber, they are ridiculously capable on the street.
 

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If you're not vain, some of the new "ADV style" bikes are fantastic road bikes for folks who can't bend their knees. With the tall seat, the bars fixed, a little suspension work and good street rubber, they are ridiculously capable on the street.
I'm not vain, I just don't want be seen on an adventure bike 😇
 

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I think tube bars are way easier/cheaper to fix than clip-ons and I prefer their aesthetics even though the look dated today.
I agree tubulars are easier/cheaper to mod. One time my local Cycle Gear was clearancing out a whole bunch of Renthal fat bars, and I scooped up about 1/2 dozen at some $29 each. Changed out all my dirt bikes and still have a few left.

The problem I see with tubulars on road bikes is that the typical aftemarket tubulars are made primarily for off-road use, where the rider sits upright and stays centered on the bike. This works well on ADV-style bikes or nakeds. On sportbikes, or sportier tourers, those bends don't always work well, where the rider might prefer to lean forward and also move side to side thru the twisties.

Another issue with tubulars is you usually start by looking at pictures and data tables that list bar dimensions. You basically have to guess which might work best, or have prior experience to go by. Even if you find a store that stock a good selection, sampling them off the shelf isn't the same as riding with one on your bike. Once you pick a bend, you usually cannot adjust drop, sweep angles independently. You can basically just rotate the bar, as you pointed out. Some bikes you might be able to move fore and aft, with discrete slots, or by flipping eccentrics. Even if I have a favorite bend, how do I know if a tad more drop here or a bit less sweep there might be even more to my liking?

With clip-ons like the Apex kit, I could set the angles, reach and height to what feels right directly on the bike... and test ride. I can then make slight adjustment, and go test it out again. Repeat if necessary. True the Apex kit isn't cheap, but kits like LSL are way more expensive while being less adjustable. Some popular helibars are pretty close in price, with basically no adjustability.
 

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I use the ABM risers (similar to LSL, but better looking) on my 06 GSXR1000. I thought to use them on my ZX12R, but since I'm using ZX10R forks it would fit (ZX12R has wider fork spacing). I went with the Vortex clipons instead of the Apex. The ZX12R has 2" of built in rise in the stock triple and I knew I only wanted an extra inch. Like Apex, Vortex sells individual pieces, so I wouldn't have to buy a whole kit if 3" was wrong. Plus Vortex is much less expensive.

Arm Font Auto part Machine Metal
 

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I agree tubulars are easier/cheaper to mod. One time my local Cycle Gear was clearancing out a whole bunch of Renthal fat bars, and I scooped up about 1/2 dozen at some $29 each. Changed out all my dirt bikes and still have a few left.

The problem I see with tubulars on road bikes is that the typical aftemarket tubulars are made primarily for off-road use, where the rider sits upright and stays centered on the bike. This works well on ADV-style bikes or nakeds. On sportbikes, or sportier tourers, those bends don't always work well, where the rider might prefer to lean forward and also move side to side thru the twisties.

Another issue with tubulars is you usually start by looking at pictures and data tables that list bar dimensions. You basically have to guess which might work best, or have prior experience to go by. Even if you find a store that stock a good selection, sampling them off the shelf isn't the same as riding with one on your bike. Once you pick a bend, you usually cannot adjust drop, sweep angles independently. You can basically just rotate the bar, as you pointed out. Some bikes you might be able to move fore and aft, with discrete slots, or by flipping eccentrics. Even if I have a favorite bend, how do I know if a tad more drop here or a bit less sweep there might be even more to my liking?

With clip-ons like the Apex kit, I could set the angles, reach and height to what feels right directly on the bike... and test ride. I can then make slight adjustment, and go test it out again. Repeat if necessary. True the Apex kit isn't cheap, but kits like LSL are way more expensive while being less adjustable. Some popular helibars are pretty close in price, with basically no adjustability.
I agree that some clip-on kits offer a big variety of position options. My problem is I think most of the kits look like aftermarket, afterthought prototype units. They're ugly and look cheap. Luckily I've had pretty good luck finding tube bars that I like from sampling them on other bikes. BMW and KTM typically use bends and sweeps that I really like.

Many times I've wished I had the ability to build a product that I'd like to test. For me personally I think bars like the N1K's could be easily fixed by having a slight angle change where the bars come out of the riser pieces that clamp onto the forks. With fine splines you could simply remove the bolts that hold the bars into the risers, rotate the bars down and bolt them back in. Done. For me the height of the bars on almost every bike I've owned has been fine. It's the awkward up angle of the N1K bars that caused my wrists discomfort. The other thing I love about tube bars is they offer a ton of places to easily mount peripherals.

And for the OP, I've never been a fan of the H2. I'd take the GSX-S1000GT without a second thought.
 

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For me personally I think bars like the N1K's could be easily fixed by having a slight angle change where the bars come out of the riser pieces that clamp onto the forks. With fine splines you could simply remove the bolts that hold the bars into the risers, rotate the bars down and bolt them back in. Done. For me the height of the bars on almost every bike I've owned has been fine. It's the awkward up angle of the N1K bars that caused my wrists discomfort. The other thing I love about tube bars is they offer a ton of places to easily mount peripherals.
I haven't had issues with bars on bikes but this made me think, every VFR I've had back to the '80s allowed what you mention, moving the bar angle forward or back a few degrees and I tweaked them all just a bit. In fact on the last few, I lifted them about a half inch on the fork tubes. They probably couldn't do this on the Ninja because, particularly with the windscreen all the way down there's very little clearance. Still, a little adjustability would be nice. Pegs too.

I agree with the comments about bar riser kits. To me they all look like some erector set kludge I'd do in my garage.
 

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Kenors, I wonder how successful a person might be if they were to bend the Ninja bars?

Or, use the pre bent bars that come with the Speedymoto set? Like you said, the stock are don't need much...just a little drop, on the ends, would help.
 

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Kenors, I wonder how successful a person might be if they were to bend the Ninja bars?

Or, use the pre bent bars that come with the Speedymoto set? Like you said, the stock are don't need much...just a little drop, on the ends, would help.
I'm not a metallurgist but I think because the riser part is alloy it would be too brittle to bend without heat. The steel insert would be bendable but it's virtually covered from end to end with components that depend on it being straight.

One nice thing about tube bars was/is their adjustability. I had a 4' piece of iron pipe and bench vice that let me make tube bars do anything I wanted! Within reason, of course. Come to think of it, I used that setup more to straighten bars than bend them. :)
 

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Kenors, I wonder how successful a person might be if they were to bend the Ninja bars?

Or, use the pre bent bars that come with the Speedymoto set? Like you said, the stock are don't need much...just a little drop, on the ends, would help.
If I was going to run a set of aftermarket clip-ons on my N1K, I think they'd be the Speedymotos. That's the same idea I think all bikes like the N1K should come with. Hopefully all these clip-on sets aren't any narrower than the stock bars, I wouldn't want to give up any leverage on this pig. It's a handful going fast on the really tight roads I like to spend time on. I always wished the stock bars were a smidge wider.
 

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You should be able to make the stock bars a bit wider with spacers and longer bar end bolts. The handguards I have came with 1/2" spacers pushing their mounts away from the bars. This could be used to add 1/2" to 3/4" to the ends of both bars. Move the hardware out to meet the grip and you're done. On the clutch side you'll have to mount the grip out over the spacer. The Ninja doesn't have any wiring inside the bars and I don't think the bar hardware is keyed to the bar. If it is, new key holes could be drilled.

This is probably all moot because the angle won't change and somewhere back in the thread the angle was the main issue.

And watch the "pig" comments. I like my light nimble svelte touring rig! 😄
 

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I dropped a couple of washers in the bar housing to widen mine. I did not need a longer bolt for this. But did use thread lock.
 

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If you do the washer thing, on the bar end side, you can tune the vibration. Not much, but it definitely changes it.

I made my bars wider just to the point where the pin was barely in place rather than seated.
 

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And watch the "pig" comments. I like my light nimble svelte touring rig! 😄
Sorry, it's my touring rig as well. My other three bikes weigh over a hundred pounds less and feel a hundred and fifty lbs lighter when I ride them.
 

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They work great for me. You wouldn't think that a 1 3/8" drop would make that much difference in legroom comfort, but it does.
I agree. I have ridden HouTex1000SX bike back-to-back with my stock bike. The difference is night and day going from one bike to the other.
 
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