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Discussion Starter #1
hello fellows,

the 2014 Ninja has about 10300 miles on it and its running fine....eventually i will replace the brake pads..not just yet...i found a site selling sintered gaffer pads for about $35 for the rear and $39 for each side on the front....would these be good choices for old man who thinks he's riding aggressive..i know i don't really compared to others....?...thanks for any advice

mrsand
 

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Don't know how the Vesrahs compare to Brembo's ... but I stick now to Brembo SA's.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
New brake pads

thanks EM, by the way...enjoyed your dismantle/re-assemble story..i would bet a lot was learned about your bike...
 

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thanks EM, by the way...enjoyed your dismantle/re-assemble story..i would bet a lot was learned about your bike...
Biggest lesson was about tinkering a bike.
I thought it was like 100% tinkering... boy was I wrong.

it's :
- 17% tinkering
- 33% cleaning
- 50% searching the tools you had like one second before in your hand


:D
 
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Just get yourself the Vesrah's. I'm going to give those a go next time around. They seem to be well liked, regardless of what moto they're put on, and they're much cheaper than the rest. I think the sintered motorcycle pads are all about the same anyways.

On my 650, I ran EBC sintered pads. Way better than stock, but pricey at $80 for the front end. That's just too much for tiny little moto pads, but I was in a rush to get rid of the stockers before a long ride. Live and learn. :rolleyes:
 

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I think the sintered motorcycle pads are all about the same anyways.
Nope.

I had the EBC HH's, the Brembo SA & Brembo SC.
There is actually a big difference between the three, bite, feel, etc ...

I don't like the EBC HH's at all.
I liked the Brembo SC's as well, but the increased price was too much for the extra benefits, so I stick to the SA's
 

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Exp, brembo is not as easy for us to get, bit ive tried meqn different pads, too, and would ech what you say.

Galfer, sbs, oem kawasaki zx10r, ebc, cheap ebay, and Vesran are all different. Anyone would notice.

The brembo I tried were oem gsxr 1000, so its not fair to judge those. Like our pads, they were meant to be very mild.
 

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Nope.

I had the EBC HH's, the Brembo SA & Brembo SC.
There is actually a big difference between the three, bite, feel, etc ...

I don't like the EBC HH's at all.
I liked the Brembo SC's as well, but the increased price was too much for the extra benefits, so I stick to the SA's
Wow, learn something every day I suppose! What didn't you like about the EBC's? I've only ever had those, and stock pads. At least on the 650, the EBC's felt great. Nice progressive braking, excellent initial bite, and zero fade. Then again, the stock pads are horrid, so maybe anything would feel better, lol.
 

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anything feels better then the stock.
I found them to be unpredictable. They might have more bite, but less feel.

I found the difference really big
On my Europe trip (7000km twisties), after having to change my Brembo SA's way too fast (58kg extra luggage, and driving spirited = not good for brake pad wear), the only ones in stock they had where the EBC HH's.
I kinda ride very spirited all the time on mountain roads, and I found them to be unpredictable when braking very hard towards hairpins. I always ended up a few meters further then I wanted. After 3400km I had another tire change, and I was glad to put new Brembo SA's back on it again. I still have the EBC's lying here, half used.
I was very glad to have the predictability & feel of the Brembo's back.

I know the friction rating of the EBC HH is higher then BREMBO SA (not SC), but it doesn't say everything I guess.
I could moderate the brake force much better with the Brembo's, and they just felt right. I always knew exactly how much force was applied all the time. (The Brembo RCS19 master cylinder helps a lot on that part).

I did a few of the same roads after having the Brembo's placed, and everytime I was at the right speed where I wanted ... while the friction rating is lower.

Might sound strange, I know, and it might as well be a very personal thing.
I know more guys here that prefer the Brembo's above the EBC's.
 
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Doesn't sound strange at all! And yeah, personal preference is definitely a factor.

That really makes me wonder if all of EBC's pads are not created the same. I remember I had their Green Stuff pads for a car, and they were the single most awful pads I've ever had on anything. They wore out very fast to boot. On the 650 though, the HH sintered pads were great, pretty much the opposite of what your experience was. I'm certain there's a large skill gap between us though, with you in the lead, so maybe that's the difference. Although I did give them quite the thrashings after they bedded in. Toasted my front tire doing that too, lol.
 

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Just get yourself the Vesrah's. I'm going to give those a go next time around. They seem to be well liked, regardless of what moto they're put on, and they're much cheaper than the rest. I think the sintered motorcycle pads are all about the same anyways.

On my 650, I ran EBC sintered pads. Way better than stock, but pricey at $80 for the front end. That's just too much for tiny little moto pads, but I was in a rush to get rid of the stockers before a long ride. Live and learn. :rolleyes:
This conversation sounds familiar....no, nothing similar about any of them.

On a car? Probably. We have motorcycles.

If 40 is expensive, its a different mindset. You just find find anything decent until you spend that much..

A ninja 650 has junk calipers, and a low end master cylinder. Than just where good pad will pay off. Where nothing is on your side.
 

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A motorcycle is a good place to go ahead and buy top of the line stuff. Tires and brake pads come to mind..

If you want to save money, do it yourself and save money on the labor side....or, just pay for good stuff.

A stickier tire, or a better rain tire can save your life. A pad with a better feel will allow you to stop faster.

Ebay has full brake pad sets for less thand 25 bucks. Front and rear, shipping included.

Are they any good? I hope no person here knows. The savings is not worth the risk, or it should not be.
 

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So you're not recommending Vesrah's then?

And yes, $40 a side is expensive. More money doesn't automatically mean quality. These days, so much stuff that's touted as "top of the line" should actually read "top of the price-point". I've run cheap tires in the past that everyone said to avoid(Shinko's), simply because they were cheap. They all recommended some absurdly over priced Michelins. Guess what happened? The Shinko's worked just fine. They didn't turn to oiled discs in the rain, and I didn't crash and die just because I didn't spend a fortune on tires. When I finally did try some expensive Michelin's, they were the second worst tires I've ever run. Horrid grip, sucked in the wet, and they wore very fast, despite mellow riding. I'm not saying there isn't junk out there, don't get me wrong. I certainly wouldn't run some no-name ebay brand of brake pads. But more money doesn't mean crap these days.

It also depends on application. If someone is a casual fair-weather rider, they don't need top of the line. Now if you're a fast rider, and/or tracking, or ride year round, then yeah, you want the best grip and braking you can get your hands on. I doubt these pads make a huge difference in stopping distance anyways, I'd say it's more about feel, unless the bike has total garbage to start with. The 650's stopping distance sure didn't change, despite tons better feel.
 

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The Vesrah's are great pads, and its really all a person should consider, based on what I've tested. You will for sure get by on others, and will likely save money.

The shinko tires are fine. I've used them. They are probably 75% as good as michelin. Thats fine, until I need that extra 25 percent in a turn I entered too quickly. Then, the 100 dollar savings just might not be so important. The next 35 years when your mind goes over the question, after the crash, costs so much more than the 100 you initially saved.

It always surprised me when anyone less than pro level will buy lower quality tires and brake pads.

A pro can ride around flaws in his bike, and knows just how to handle limitations. A beginner needs all the help he can get from top tires, and brakes.

Good quality tires and brakes is like a helmet. Hopefully you are not pushing its limits each and every ride, but that extra margin of performance can save you from a crash. The guys running automotive rear tires save a ton of money, too, an that usually works. Mostly. Often.


Most of us learned this the hard way. A real good way to improve is to learn form another persons mistakes.

If someone is excited at saving 500, per year, on cheap tires, cheap chains, and cheap brakes, then go for it.
 

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The Vesrah's are great pads, and its really all a person should consider, based on what I've tested. You will for sure get by on others, and will likely save money.

The shinko tires are fine. I've used them. They are probably 75% as good as michelin. Thats fine, until I need that extra 25 percent in a turn I entered too quickly. Then, the 100 dollar savings just might not be so important. The next 35 years when your mind goes over the question, after the crash, costs so much more than the 100 you initially saved.

It always surprised me when anyone less than pro level will buy lower quality tires and brake pads.

A pro can ride around flaws in his bike, and knows just how to handle limitations. A beginner needs all the help he can get from top tires, and brakes.

Good quality tires and brakes is like a helmet. Hopefully you are not pushing its limits each and every ride, but that extra margin of performance can save you from a crash. The guys running automotive rear tires save a ton of money, too, an that usually works. Mostly. Often.


Most of us learned this the hard way. A real good way to improve is to learn form another persons mistakes.

If someone is excited at saving 500, per year, on cheap tires, cheap chains, and cheap brakes, then go for it.
Oh yeah, for sure a beginner shouldn't be cheap-ing out. I should've clarified that, I'm usually referring to experienced riders when I'm talking about this stuff.

I agree, to a point. If you're the type of rider that pushes hard regularly, then **** yes, go for that extra bit of whatever. But for an average, mellow rider, it's splitting hairs. And don't get me wrong, I've had loads of near misses despite riding mellow. Between cell phone using corner cutting a-holes, deer, rocks/gravel, and oil slicks, I've had my fair share of misses and then some, lol. Yet not once did I think, ****, wish I had 5% more grip. Well, except when I ran the Michelin PR2's. :rolleyes:
 

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There is not splitting hairs with regards to this.

Heres expensive. Go to our other topic where the guy damaged his front rim. Now, a bent rim sucks but he made an incredible save. 600, at most, will buy a rim and he has no other damage.

Expensive is if he happened to be running a crap tire, and went down. The "I wonder if a grippier tire might have grabbed sooner...."

That lasts through the broken ribs, damaged bike, and will haunt you forever. Rider experience level is a non issue.

If a great tire was $42,000 and a shinko was 95.00, we have a point.

When a Shinko is 63.00 and a Michelin is 125.00 ???

Its the same reason not to ride vintage, 70's bikes. They are fine, 98 percent of the time but consider limits. I've had situations that pushed modern brakes, suspension, and power to its limit in order to keep me from crashing.

There are places to save money, but its a false economy of doing so lowers performance limits. Who says you, as a rider, always control the times when you need maximum performance?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
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"A pro can ride around flaws in his bike, and knows just how to handle limitations. A beginner needs all the help he can get from top tires, and brakes."


I can easily agree with this statement....I know for a fact i need the assistance that a genuine good tire or brake can give. I remain cautious (most of the time) despite the bikes abilities...they are better than my experience level...however, i continue to learn---which is much fun......turned off the traction control tonight and practiced some low wheeliessssss
 

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I'm not disagreeing with you. Well, not completely anyways. "Who says you, as a rider, always control the times when you need maximum performance?" For sure, I get it! Been there, done that. I wasn't saying otherwise. "There are places to save money, but its a false economy of doing so lowers performance limits." Agreed as well! Of course we don't want to reduce performance! But are any of the HH sintered pads a downgrade from stock? I doubt it, excluding the no-name ebay stuff of course. I was simply try to say that price does not always relate to quality.

As for splitting hairs, well, lets go back to tires. Shinko vs Michelin. $65 vs $125. The Michelin is roughly twice as much. Is the performance double? Nope. Is it even 50% better? Unlikely. Is it even a huge, noticeable jump? Maybe, depending on the exact models, and if you're tracking, or just a really good rider. If you're not that good, then come near-accident time, that grip won't matter if you don't know how to use it. Always go for the best? By that reasoning, we should all be running Dunlop Q3's or some other grippy, quick wearing sport tire. I'm not saying, "oh, lets buy the cheapest junk we can because there's ZERO difference". But at the same time, I see no need to spend double on tires, when there may not be a need. Reminds me of the young BMW car crowd around here. They drive like grandpa in a Camry, but by god, they've just HAVE to have those $400/ea performance tires, lol. There's also no need to go cheap, just to go cheap. It's all compromises, and we need to decide what we're willing to give up.

Each rider must evaluate his situation, skill level, and buy accordingly, provided they're not reducing performance of course. Reasonable? :)

EDIT : Ugh, that was a long, borderline pointless rant. How about this? Just do your homework, and avoid the junk out there, and you'll be fine. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The text below comes from vesrahs website.....the underlined numbers represent the pad choices for a 2014 ninja 1000 abs...organic and metal sintered pads are noted....can someone explain the difference in materials and their intended use? thanks in advance

Street KAWASAKI ZX1000 1000 HBF, HCF, HDF, MEF, MFF Ninja 1000 ABS 11-15 * VD-355JL * SD-355

VD-434JL SD-434
 
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