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I saw the pics and they look like aftermarket pegs I'm unfamiliar with. They certainly aren't stock Ninja pegs. They look adjustable, though.
 

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I used him via email. He got me as close as I got myself. If we mark were we start from and can return it, you don't have much to lose trying him.
 

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I have some pictures with my foot on the brake pedal off the grate of the peg and on the actual grate as you can see... my heel is actually ON THE EXHAUST! lol I think the peg is way too low and a tall rider was on this bike if I am not mistaken. I was told it was a older man in his late 50s that had to make ends meet due to hard times (hence low mileage). However I did notice one of the allen bolts looks about to round out. So I'm going to have the dealer mess with it so if they mess it up then its their problem and get a new bolt from fastenal or something. The shifter side doesn't look so bad so I can adjust that part myself. So is my theory correct that the foot pegs are just WAY too low? View attachment 34426 View attachment 34427 View attachment 34428 View attachment 34429


Definitely aftermarket, and quite a bit lower than stock - easily at least 1.5"
(look for my intro thread for pics).

The Knights pegs that I put on mine dropped 1.5", and I was able to adjust my brake and shifter to the correct heights - I have an aftermarket slip on (Delkevic) so probably have more room for my heel in that area. It is a tight area to work in when adjusting the brake pedal rear brake light switch, so if you have big hands or just aren't good at this sort of thing might consider having a shop do it, as you definitely want your brakes and lights working correctly. Shifter was very easy to adjust.

Can go to stock height pegs, but that depends on how tall you are and how much you need or want the extra leg room.
 

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When talking about the Sargent seat, have you guys priced one, lately?

If I were to buy mine, today, it would be 400.00+. Maybe shipping is free, but I don't know? I know everything costs more, now, but this feels like ordering McDonalds fish sandwich and paying 12.99 for it. The sandwich is still pretty good, but the cost vs good ratio is screwed up.

The best pricing I see for this stock Sargent seat is 399.00 from RevZilla, and I don't think it's worth that. An ok upgrade at 275.00, but not so much at 400.00
 
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'12 Ninja 1000 (w/ late model KQR panniers), 03 KTM 525 EXC
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You raise a good point RC. Inflation and the rising costs of everything is just ridiculous lately. Think I got my sargeant seat for around 250? Maybe 300? Its been a few years. Lord knows if I need the heated seat, I'm definitely not wearing the right clothing for the given ride, lol.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Definitely aftermarket, and quite a bit lower than stock - easily at least 1.5"
(look for my intro thread for pics).

The Knights pegs that I put on mine dropped 1.5", and I was able to adjust my brake and shifter to the correct heights - I have an aftermarket slip on (Delkevic) so probably have more room for my heel in that area. It is a tight area to work in when adjusting the brake pedal rear brake light switch, so if you have big hands or just aren't good at this sort of thing might consider having a shop do it, as you definitely want your brakes and lights working correctly. Shifter was very easy to adjust.

Can go to stock height pegs, but that depends on how tall you are and how much you need or want the extra leg room.
Well im short 5"6 so I'm assuming I need my pegs to come up correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
When talking about the Sargent seat, have you guys priced one, lately?

If I were to buy mine, today, it would be 400.00+. Maybe shipping is free, but I don't know? I know everything costs more, now, but this feels like ordering McDonalds fish sandwich and paying 12.99 for it. The sandwich is still pretty good, but the cost vs good ratio is screwed up.

The best pricing I see for this stock Sargent seat is 399.00 from RevZilla, and I don't think it's worth that. An ok upgrade at 275.00, but not so much at 400.00
Yea I saw that too. If they jacked up the price a lot from what it used go be they better be "improved"
 

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When talking about the Sargent seat, have you guys priced one, lately?

If I were to buy mine, today, it would be 400.00+. Maybe shipping is free, but I don't know? I know everything costs more, now, but this feels like ordering McDonalds fish sandwich and paying 12.99 for it. The sandwich is still pretty good, but the cost vs good ratio is screwed up.

The best pricing I see for this stock Sargent seat is 399.00 from RevZilla, and I don't think it's worth that. An ok upgrade at 275.00, but not so much at 400.00
Wow, makes me glad I got one for my 2011 Ninja for $250. Moving it to my '14 and now '18 is looking like a great decision.
 
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Im about the same height @ 168 cm. Ive had my seat reupholstered which made a slight difference but recently got 6mm added to my A* smx6 boots. He stiched and glued a grippy sole to them. Made a difference.
 

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After reading your initial post my 1st thought was, if you only rode 30 miles & your inner crotch was aching from using the rear brake then you are probably relying on the rear brake far too much when you ride ! An old mate of mine who was an ex racer told me a long time ago to ride around for a month without using the rear brake at all so i would develop muscle memory in my right hand which would one day save my life. He was correct ! So now i barely use the rear brake at all unless helping me steer in a corner or if/when i need it in an emergency. You said you are a safety geek so i though this comment may be appropriate !
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
After reading your initial post my 1st thought was, if you only rode 30 miles & your inner crotch was aching from using the rear brake then you are probably relying on the rear brake far too much when you ride ! An old mate of mine who was an ex racer told me a long time ago to ride around for a month without using the rear brake at all so i would develop muscle memory in my right hand which would one day save my life. He was correct ! So now i barely use the rear brake at all unless helping me steer in a corner or if/when i need it in an emergency. You said you are a safety geek so i though this comment may be appropriate !
Thanks for the tip I been using both brakes when I can. But when slowing to stop I use my front.
 

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No worries...Front brakes have twin large rotors & twin large calipers for very good reason, while the rear is a small rotor & a small single caliper only designed as a control brake, yet i see most riders braking incorrectly all the time & it is obvious that not many practise braking skills until they become muscle memory. There is a road near where i live which comes out of the hills & ends up (unexpectedly if you dont know the road) at a T-intersection, and there was a 40 metre rear lock up skid mark on the road where the guy panicked, applied the back brake, then continued skidding through the intersection, hit a rock cliff face and died...If he had technique he would have stopped easily & be alive today ! All the leathers & helmets in the world wont stop bones from breaking & internals from rupturing so i believe good skills are your best protection...Rant over !
 

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'12 Ninja 1000 (w/ late model KQR panniers), 03 KTM 525 EXC
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Trail braking has its merits, gentlemen. Stabbing the rear brake does not. Likewise the front. Squeeze, don't grab. Slowly but steadily squeeze. Some fun to be had practicing stoppies and seeing how it all works.
 
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
No worries...Your front brakes have twin large rotors & twin calipers for very a good reason, obviously, while the rear is a small rotor & small caliper (only designed as a control brake) and yet i see most riders braking incorrectly all the time & it is obvious that not many practise braking skills until they become muscle memory. There is a road near where i live which comes out of the hills & ends up at a T-intersection, and there is a 40 metre (or more) rear lock up where the guy panicked & hit the back brake, then he continued through the intersection, hit a rock cliff face and died...If he had technique he would have stopped easily & be alive today !
I understand stand that. I know the rears don't stop the bike hardly at all. Engine braking by itself is more effective when using no brakes than using just the rear with the clutch pulled in. I do all three in emergencies. But i havent had but one instance to use that technique. I didnt see a pothole cause i was focusing on a car that i was in their blind spot and the dummy in front preventing me from getting out of it. Slowed from 70 to 35 and swerved just in time to miss a basically a crater. Of course i should have just slowed down and put even more distance in front of me like an 8 second gap and paid attention to the road in front of that car. Lesson learned. But I found the issue today. I adjusted those pegs and my feet sit more relaxed and I can reach both controls comfortably now without doing some ankle yoga causing my thighs to squeeze the hell out of the seat just to "cover" the controls. Lol
 

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Trail braking has its merits, gentlemen. Stabbing the rear brake does not. Likewise the front. Squeeze, don't grab. Slowly but steadily squeeze. Some fun to be had practicing stoppies and seeing how it all works.
Yep, any braking practise is worth the effort & trail braking is very handy & stoppies are a good way to get a feel for your brakes, but maybe not a great idea for some less skilled riders, lol...
 

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I understand stand that. I know the rears don't stop the bike hardly at all. Engine braking by itself is more effective when using no brakes than using just the rear with the clutch pulled in. I do all three in emergencies. But i havent had but one instance to use that technique. I didnt see a pothole cause i was focusing on a car that i was in their blind spot and the dummy in front preventing me from getting out of it. Slowed from 70 to 35 and swerved just in time to miss a basically a crater. Of course i should have just slowed down and put even more distance in front of me like an 8 second gap and paid attention to the road in front of that car. Lesson learned. But I found the issue today. I adjusted those pegs and my feet sit more relaxed and I can reach both controls comfortably now without doing some ankle yoga causing my thighs to squeeze the hell out of the seat just to "cover" the controls. Lol
All any of us can do is practise good technique, learn from our mistakes & always want to improve !
 

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Exactly, Pete. I think the most important thing with regard to any of this, is fitting the bike to yourself. And get comfortable with it. If theres something that bothers you, change it so its better for you. It's difficult to react appropriately when danger shows itself when you're uncomfortable on your machine.

I won't lie, Chad. I've been surprised a myriad of times since I started riding. It's usually a thing of becoming frustrated or pissed off. Like when a dump truck has a load of uncovered lightweight aggregate that's heaped, and the driver has to slam on the brakes or aggressively change lanes, covering the road in junk. That just gets under my skin like no other. Doesn't take much to slip when there's something slippery or loose between your tires and the pavement. Just have to keep your wits about you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Yep, any braking practise is worth the effort & trail braking is very handy & stoppies are a good way to get a feel for your brakes, but maybe not a great idea for some less skilled riders, lol...
Yeah won't be doing stoppies anytime soon lol. I'm still getting used to turns. Meaning I'm kinda impressed how much faster a bike can take turns than my Focus RS. Turns I can only do 30mph tops without losing control in a car I'm taking at 45mph with ease. I'm just easing myself into it. It's no different than when I got to a new track on my dirtbike. I rolled the jumps and as time went on and the days I started jumping and getting faster and faster. Knowing what turns my bike can handle and how fast. Throttle and speed needed for each jump ect. Soon I applied it to other tracks with no issue. Picture of me at the track day one with my CR250 2 stroke attached lol. I'm more cautious cause now I don't got those boots or knee pads on, it's pavement, and going a lot faster... I also had a neckbrace and elbows and chest protector on later down the road. I'm a big believer of all the gear all the time. But at those speeds unlike a track in the dirt that gear will only do so much when you go past 35mph and you have objects to collide with that isn't just a berm or sand pit. I guess I could have gone through a fence on that track but that would take a hell of a lot of negligence lmao.
 

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