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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2019 Ninja 1000 ABS used with 2500 miles. Noticed a few things when I got on the bike.
1. I am 5"6 and big boy was feeling not so confident in my toes. So I bought the reduced reach seat. Don't feel too much of a difference sitting on it as of right now since I installed it. But feels narrower. Should I go lowering links or go to the dealer to have them adjust the suspension for me and seeing what they can do before doing so?

2. The foot pegs I don't believe are stock and I just noticed when I'm sitting on the bike my foot is angled outwards. Meaning I can't cover the rear brake pedal without twisting my foot in which explains why my inner crotch area is sore from a 30 mile trip from yesterday. The shifter isn't too bad... but I also noticed just to brake my foot has to literally be at the base or mount of the peg. Meaning off the grated part. Do I need new foot pegs or do I need to adjust them? Is the brake pedal adjustable? I can of course get this looked at when at the dealer for the suspension setup... but I'd rather do those pedal and peg adjustments myself.

I guess it would be dumb to say when I first rode the bike I didn't even really need to use the rear brake at all. Just gentle front brake pressure. Cause the engine braking on this is insane even in 6th gear. But sure would like to use both easily at a stop or an emergency.

If there is any other tips rather than don't be an idiot I'd appreciate it. Cause dirt is dirt and pavement is different (and more dangerous). I'm an overly cautious safety geek basically. I have to have full gear or I feel like I'm not even wearing a helmet.
 

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@Chadster54321 , I'm the same height as you and also purchased the reduced reach seat. Like you said, it's mostly narrower with less padding on top. I have a 30" inseam and with the stock seat each heel is approximately 2-1/2" off the ground. With the reduced seat, each heel is about 1" off the ground. I feel more stable at stoplights, especially when there's a strong crosswind whipping around.

For me, the reduced seat is VERY uncomfortable on longer rides due to less padding. I switched back to the stock seat for now. I'm looking for a place to upgrade the reduced seat's foam with something more comfortable.

Personally, I'd rather adapt than lower the bike. I've never been able to flatfoot any previous bike, but could touch the balls of both feet on each model. The N1K is the first bike I've owned where a factory lower seat is available, so thought I'd give it a try.

Whenever I get frustrated about not flatfooting a bike, I remember this guy who was about 5'4" tripoding a Triumph Tiger. He adapted and was able to get around just fine. I purposely stay away from ADV bikes, because I prefer two feet touching at a stop, but that's just me.
 

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Shaving the seat foam to make it narrower/round has helped reduce pressure on the back of my thighs and alleviated a lot of the pain during long rides. The standard seat has angular edges and those edges hurt when you sit on them for a while. This also helps you get your feet closer to the ground.
You could lower the bike but that comes with its own share of things like cost, lower ground clearance etc. Shaving the seat and re-covering it is easier/cheaper first-shot and if that's not cutting it, you can look to lower the bike
 

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2021 Ninja 1000SX
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2019 Ninja 1000 ABS used with 2500 miles. Noticed a few things when I got on the bike.
1. I am 5"6 and big boy was feeling not so confident in my toes. So I bought the reduced reach seat. Don't feel too much of a difference sitting on it as of right now since I installed it. But feels narrower. Should I go lowering links or go to the dealer to have them adjust the suspension for me and seeing what they can do before doing so?

2. The foot pegs I don't believe are stock and I just noticed when I'm sitting on the bike my foot is angled outwards. Meaning I can't cover the rear brake pedal without twisting my foot in which explains why my inner crotch area is sore from a 30 mile trip from yesterday. The shifter isn't too bad... but I also noticed just to brake my foot has to literally be at the base or mount of the peg. Meaning off the grated part. Do I need new foot pegs or do I need to adjust them? Is the brake pedal adjustable? I can of course get this looked at when at the dealer for the suspension setup... but I'd rather do those pedal and peg adjustments myself.

I guess it would be dumb to say when I first rode the bike I didn't even really need to use the rear brake at all. Just gentle front brake pressure. Cause the engine braking on this is insane even in 6th gear. But sure would like to use both easily at a stop or an emergency.

If there is any other tips rather than don't be an idiot I'd appreciate it. Cause dirt is dirt and pavement is different (and more dangerous). I'm an overly cautious safety geek basically. I have to have full gear or I feel like I'm not even wearing a helmet.
Yep you can adjust the shifter easy but the brake is pain since the brake retention spring needs to adjusted and to get to the adjust is a nightmare. I adjusted angle and had the dealer adjust the sping on the brake. The spring is what triggers the brake light.
Common mistake people adjust the brake position but forget about the spring. Then no brake light….. if not adjusted.
 

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2019 Ninja 1000 ABS used with 2500 miles. Noticed a few things when I got on the bike.
1. I am 5"6 and big boy was feeling not so confident in my toes. So I bought the reduced reach seat. Don't feel too much of a difference sitting on it as of right now since I installed it. But feels narrower. Should I go lowering links or go to the dealer to have them adjust the suspension for me and seeing what they can do before doing so?

2. The foot pegs I don't believe are stock and I just noticed when I'm sitting on the bike my foot is angled outwards. Meaning I can't cover the rear brake pedal without twisting my foot in which explains why my inner crotch area is sore from a 30 mile trip from yesterday. The shifter isn't too bad... but I also noticed just to brake my foot has to literally be at the base or mount of the peg. Meaning off the grated part. Do I need new foot pegs or do I need to adjust them? Is the brake pedal adjustable? I can of course get this looked at when at the dealer for the suspension setup... but I'd rather do those pedal and peg adjustments myself.

I guess it would be dumb to say when I first rode the bike I didn't even really need to use the rear brake at all. Just gentle front brake pressure. Cause the engine braking on this is insane even in 6th gear. But sure would like to use both easily at a stop or an emergency.

If there is any other tips rather than don't be an idiot I'd appreciate it. Cause dirt is dirt and pavement is different (and more dangerous). I'm an overly cautious safety geek basically. I have to have full gear or I feel like I'm not even wearing a helmet.
I'm nearly of the same height as you (5 foot 7), upload some photos once you can regarding the footpegs. Everything is adjustable so you simply have to play around with them, even the brake and clutch levers or the gear and brake lever. The ergonomics of this bike to me are a 11/10 especially for our height so just a short time to get used to its perfection :LOL:

Dont worry about the seat height in one month you'll feel just fine, you just need to get used to the weight of the bike and for a 235kg stock its amazingly balanced, you can remove both feet from the ground and it'll stay straight for 2 or 3 seconds before starting to tip on one side. As per the lowering links just DON'T , I did it to my old Z900 and something always felt weird in looks and riding abilities.

Nearly forgot, I had my seat done from SW Motech in Germany and their spacer fabric inside has maybe raised the height by 1/2 cm, but I still feel confident enough
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm nearly of the same height as you (5 foot 7), upload some photos once you can regarding the footpegs. Everything is adjustable so you simply have to play around with them, even the brake and clutch levers or the gear and brake lever. The ergonomics of this bike to me are a 11/10 especially for our height so just a short time to get used to its perfection :LOL:

Dont worry about the seat height in one month you'll feel just fine, you just need to get used to the weight of the bike and for a 235kg stock its amazingly balanced, you can remove both feet from the ground and it'll stay straight for 2 or 3 seconds before starting to tip on one side. As per the lowering links just DON'T , I did it to my old Z900 and something always felt weird in looks and riding abilities.

Nearly forgot, I my seat done from SW Motech in Germany and their spacer fabric inside has maybe raised the height by 1/2 cm, but I still feel confident enough
I will upload pictures later today and as far as lowering links I was told you have to adjust the suspension later. If not it will upset the balance of the bike. Will also look into motech
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep you can adjust the shifter easy but the brake is pain since the brake retention spring needs to adjusted and to get to the adjust is a nightmare. I adjusted angle and had the dealer adjust the sping on the brake. The spring is what triggers the brake light.
Common mistake people adjust the brake position but forget about the spring. Then no brake light….. if not adjusted.
Hmm I'll probably have the dealer fool with it then if adjusting the pegs won't work.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@Chadster54321 , I'm the same height as you and also purchased the reduced reach seat. Like you said, it's mostly narrower with less padding on top. I have a 30" inseam and with the stock seat each heel is approximately 2-1/2" off the ground. With the reduced seat, each heel is about 1" off the ground. I feel more stable at stoplights, especially when there's a strong crosswind whipping around.

For me, the reduced seat is VERY uncomfortable on longer rides due to less padding. I switched back to the stock seat for now. I'm looking for a place to upgrade the reduced seat's foam with something more comfortable.

Personally, I'd rather adapt than lower the bike. I've never been able to flatfoot any previous bike, but could touch the balls of both feet on each model. The N1K is the first bike I've owned where a factory lower seat is available, so thought I'd give it a try.

Whenever I get frustrated about not flatfooting a bike, I remember this guy who was about 5'4" tripoding a Triumph Tiger. He adapted and was able to get around just fine. I purposely stay away from ADV bikes, because I prefer two feet touching at a stop, but that's just me.
I'm on the ball of foot too but probably not as much as yours is. My inseam is 28 inches. But yea if I'm going on a LONG ride I will put the old seat on. Cause on a long ride I don't think I'll be stopping too much and will be mostly freeway.
 

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Welcome to the forum Chad and congratulation on you 2019 N1K. Flat footing is a Harley thing, fortunately the N1K isn't a Harley thing. If you lower the rear, no amount of suspension adjustment will compensate for the changes in front end geometry that lowering the rear creates, it's a bad move. Not being able to flat foot is a common complaint I hear from new street riders and the common wrong answer is a lowering link. The correct answer others have already provided, get used to it. Most every bike I have owned I'm on my toes. but if getting a heel down makes you more comfortable, shift your butt on the seat to the down leg side. You only need one foot down (most of the time) and it will not be long before you are accustom to being on your toes or balls of your feet.

If you didn't get a owner manual with the bike, you can download a pdf owners manual from online. Suspension settings are easy to find and easy to adjust. The harder part is knowing which to adjust and how much. I would suggest checking each setting to see how far they are from the factory setting. Mark and write down where you start from so you can return to that setting. If the settings aren't factory, that's where I would start, return all the settings to factory. I would use caution trusting any dealer to make suspension settings, I have never known any dealer mechanic who had any ability to make a proper adjustment. On the other hand maybe your dealer is the exception. Your a motocross racer, both are two wheels, different but the same, you probably know all this.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Welcome to the forum Chad and congratulation on you 2019 N1K. Flat footing is a Harley thing, fortunately the N1K isn't a Harley thing. If you lower the rear, no amount of suspension adjustment will compensate for the changes in front end geometry that lowering the rear creates, it's a bad move. Not being able to flat foot is a common complaint I hear from new street riders and the common wrong answer is a lowering link. The correct answer others have already provided, get used to it. Most every bike I have owned I'm on my toes. but if getting a heel down makes you more comfortable, shift your butt on the seat to the down leg side. You only need one foot down (most of the time) and it will not be long before you are accustom to being on your toes or balls of your feet.

If you didn't get a owner manual with the bike, you can download a pdf owners manual from online. Suspension settings are easy to find and easy to adjust. The harder part is knowing which to adjust and how much. I would suggest checking each setting to see how far they are from the factory setting. Mark and write down where you start from so you can return to that setting. If the settings aren't factory, that's where I would start, return all the settings to factory. I would use caution trusting any dealer to make suspension settings, I have never known any dealer mechanic who had any ability to make a proper adjustment. On the other hand maybe your dealer is the exception. Your a motocross racer, both are two wheels, different but the same, you probably know all this.
Correct the dealer I am working with has rebuilt my forks on my dirtbike and it felt amazing. I'll be there with the bike so if I can tell the guy doesn't know what he is doing (which is pretty easy to do cause i used to be a mechanic and had to help with new hires) I'll just tell them to put it on standard settings and walk. I saw there is a guy online who will coach you to tune the suspension yourself. The name escaped me but I found it on these forums.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm nearly of the same height as you (5 foot 7), upload some photos once you can regarding the footpegs. Everything is adjustable so you simply have to play around with them, even the brake and clutch levers or the gear and brake lever. The ergonomics of this bike to me are a 11/10 especially for our height so just a short time to get used to its perfection :LOL:

Dont worry about the seat height in one month you'll feel just fine, you just need to get used to the weight of the bike and for a 235kg stock its amazingly balanced, you can remove both feet from the ground and it'll stay straight for 2 or 3 seconds before starting to tip on one side. As per the lowering links just DON'T , I did it to my old Z900 and something always felt weird in looks and riding abilities.

Nearly forgot, I had my seat done from SW Motech in Germany and their spacer fabric inside has maybe raised the height by 1/2 cm, but I still feel confident enough
I have some pictures with my foot on the brake pedal off the grate of the peg and on the actual grate as you can see... my heel is actually ON THE EXHAUST! lol I think the peg is way too low and a tall rider was on this bike if I am not mistaken. I was told it was a older man in his late 50s that had to make ends meet due to hard times (hence low mileage). However I did notice one of the allen bolts looks about to round out. So I'm going to have the dealer mess with it so if they mess it up then its their problem and get a new bolt from fastenal or something. The shifter side doesn't look so bad so I can adjust that part myself. So is my theory correct that the foot pegs are just WAY too low?
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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Welcome to the forum Chad and congratulation on you 2019 N1K. Flat footing is a Harley thing, fortunately the N1K isn't a Harley thing. If you lower the rear, no amount of suspension adjustment will compensate for the changes in front end geometry that lowering the rear creates, it's a bad move. Not being able to flat foot is a common complaint I hear from new street riders and the common wrong answer is a lowering link. The correct answer others have already provided, get used to it. Most every bike I have owned I'm on my toes. but if getting a heel down makes you more comfortable, shift your butt on the seat to the down leg side. You only need one foot down (most of the time) and it will not be long before you are accustom to being on your toes or balls of your feet.

If you didn't get a owner manual with the bike, you can download a pdf owners manual from online. Suspension settings are easy to find and easy to adjust. The harder part is knowing which to adjust and how much. I would suggest checking each setting to see how far they are from the factory setting. Mark and write down where you start from so you can return to that setting. If the settings aren't factory, that's where I would start, return all the settings to factory. I would use caution trusting any dealer to make suspension settings, I have never known any dealer mechanic who had any ability to make a proper adjustment. On the other hand maybe your dealer is the exception. Your a motocross racer, both are two wheels, different but the same, you probably know all this.
Also yes im going to learn to deal with it. I figured as much about the lowering. But...I'm going to get a custom seat. The more narrow ergo seat is perfect! BUT now I will have a sore *** in the near future. I've never shaped my own foam so I'm going to a local upholstery guy and see what he can do while keeping it narrow and comfortable on top. Which I think is my best route also looked at a guy mentioned on these forums named laaam? I think? Heard he is a wizard.
 

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Laam makes some really comfortable seats. I don't care for them as they are too much of a saddle and I like to shift around the seat, but if I were doing 10-12 hours straight I would certainly consider his 'day long'. If your local guys has done other bike seat he may just have the solution you need, narrow in the front and nice padding in the middle and back. Either my factory seat is getting broken in or my butt is getting used to it. Although, after 400 miles or so I need more breaks!
 

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I did a seat comparison a while back on my 2014 Ninja. This may help some. I concur, the Seth Lamm seat the one to choose for those iron butt days in the saddle. Note the buildup at the front of the Seth Lamm seat...it keeps your goodies from smashing on the tank all the time.
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'12 Ninja 1000 (w/ late model KQR panniers), 03 KTM 525 EXC
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The Sargeant seat is almost the middle ground between the Seth Lamm saddle and the oem unit. Lord knows the OEM seat is a torture device after about 30 mins. The Sargeant is tolerable for a few hours but it's still real nice to get off the bike for a bit. Not sure the Sargeant is a real contender for IBR but that Seth Lamm unit looks like it would be.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I did a seat comparison a while back on my 2014 Ninja. This may help some. I concur, the Seth Lamm seat the one to choose for those iron butt days in the saddle. Note the buildup at the front of the Seth Lamm seat...it keeps your goodies from smashing on the tank all the time.
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The only thing I would change about the Sargent is to remove those dang sharp edges that similar to the stock seat. I really don't need a seat to be more "aerodynamic" lol
 

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The only thing I would change about the Sargent is to remove those dang sharp edges that similar to the stock seat. I really don't need a seat to be more "aerodynamic" lol
Actually, I thought Sargent did a good job with the shaping. No sharp edges on my Sargent, just needed more than 1/4" of padding!
 
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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Actually, I thought Sargent did a good job with the shaping. No sharp edges on my Sargent, just needed more than 1/4" of padding!
So should I save for the laam seat instead of the Sargent? I figure since I'm a heavy set guy he was my best bet also they are both close to the same price. I filled out the form but I don't know how long it takes for the guy to get back to me.
 

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For the long haul, the Seth Lamm is more comfortable than the Sargent. Very similar shape but a lot more padding.
 
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2019 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
For the long haul, the Seth Lamm is more comfortable than the Sargent. Very similar shape but a lot more padding.
Thanks I'll probably go with Lamm or see the local guys price and what he can do first. So about those foot pegs. Did u see the pictures above? I assume all I need to do is adjust them up. My tools are at my work right now so I got nothing else to really use at the moment.
 
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