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Volfy, your CRF230f is a better off roader. Much lighter, easier to handle, more docile power. On road though that dynamic changes signficantly.

I thought about getting the CRF250 and the sister Rally model. But that big power deficit made them non-starters for me. I prefer to ride to my Adventures because getting there is all part of the adventure. 90% of my dual sport riding is on pavement. Honestly, I prefer this type of bike to a sport bike. I would consider replacing my N1k with a VStrom 1000 or maybe even a 650 (maybe). But those bikes are not as capable as the DR650 off pavement. There's something about 10 inches of wheel travel and sub 400 lbs. weight that gives me more comfort off road.
 

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If my dirt skill improves, I might take a gander at the adv's, but at this point, I'd rather keep my road bikes on the road and my dirt bikes on the dirt.
Just a thought.

A guy I occasionally ride with has a possible solution. He still races KTMs off road and has an FZ1 for the street. A couple years ago he finally found a streetable dirt bike. For a couple years (2005-2006?) Honda put lights on their 650 dirt bike. I think the model designation is CR650L. For those couple years, the bike weighed in at a little over 300#, had decent power for 70-75mph highway running and was light and nimble enough to be quite dirt worthy. After that short period Honda decided to really make it DP and it gained a lot of weight. Anyway, he loves it and rides all the 100+ year old logging trails, mountain trails, our east side deserts etc. and has no problem riding to them on the highways.
 

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Mark one, its popular here, and very easy to take something like your ktm and make it street legal. Obviously, not the choice for thousand mile trips, but legal enough to get down a paved road until it turns into something fun again.

For me, that would be ideal. After 50 yrs on small, lightweight dirt bikes, theres no way I'm going to enjoy something that's 300lbs.
 

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Volfy, your CRF230f is a better off roader. Much lighter, easier to handle, more docile power. On road though that dynamic changes signficantly.

I thought about getting the CRF250 and the sister Rally model. But that big power deficit made them non-starters for me. I prefer to ride to my Adventures because getting there is all part of the adventure. 90% of my dual sport riding is on pavement. Honestly, I prefer this type of bike to a sport bike. I would consider replacing my N1k with a VStrom 1000 or maybe even a 650 (maybe). But those bikes are not as capable as the DR650 off pavement. There's something about 10 inches of wheel travel and sub 400 lbs. weight that gives me more comfort off road.
Actually, I have an '18 KLX250S (1st yr with EFI in the USA) and a '15 250 XCF-W. The CRF230F I mentioned was owned by the lead organizer of the Mexico Trek I'm doing end of April.

The KTM is my plated dirtbike for serious trail riding and challenging single tracks but still needs to be road-legal for occasionally having to ride on public hwys to connect trails. The KLX250S is the real dual sport. The CRF250L is heavier and not as dirt capable. The WR250 is going too far the exact opposite. KLX250S is a perfect compromise inbetween.

I also have a KLX140L that I bought primarily as a starter bikes for my oldest son, who has since graduated to the KLX250S. Honestly, I probably rode the 140L more than my son did, even back when it was his bike. There is a lot to be said about a modestly powered, low down to the ground, simple bikes with nothing hanging out of it to break when it takes a spill. I do stuff with it I would not dare to try on my other bikes.
 

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FWIW, plated dirt bikes are fun, but have their limits. I wouldn't want to take my KTM to the Mexico trip, even if I trailer it down to the border. There is still a good mix of road riding involved, and the KTM could do it, but just not ideal. It doesn't have cush drives and major service intervals count in hours instead of thousands of miles. If the dirt/road mix is 90:10 with some gnarly bits, I'd rock the KTM. Since this is likely to be 50:50, or at most not very technical 60/40, KLX250S is a much better fit.
 

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That's the other side of the problem, isnt it? The plated dirt bikes are miserable on the road. I dont think this is a problem they will ever solve.

I would still rather have that misery than a heavy dirt bike.The best bike I ever had, with this idea in mind was a kdx 200 Kawasaki. I wasnt the only one who was able to get 10,000 miles on a piston and rings. A rebuild was under 200.00 if the cylinder was good. If the cylinder was worn, that was good news as they had the 220cc big bore that was readily available. Still, 10 miles of street riding really sucked.
 

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Mark one, its popular here, and very easy to take something like your ktm and make it street legal. Obviously, not the choice for thousand mile trips, but legal enough to get down a paved road until it turns into something fun again.

For me, that would be ideal. After 50 yrs on small, lightweight dirt bikes, theres no way I'm going to enjoy something that's 300lbs.
Roland I get that part of it if that is your situation. For me I throw my bike in the back of my pickup and drive a couple hours to a variety of trails. Some of the trails a dual sport would not be possible.
 

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Our street legal is more" tongue in cheek" street legal. We have mountains that are controlled by the forest service. You cant touch , or cross, any of their dirt roads without being street legal. So, you add those barely street legal kits, and then its ok . We have plated Quads and every RZR I've seen is street legal. It's silly, to be honest, but it opens up the options. The valley is hot in the summer. The mountains will be 70 degrees. The west desert doesnt require anything to be legal, but all bikes have to run spark arrestors. The fine for not having one is 300.00.

Most still haul their bikes , or side-by-side to the mountain destinations. The plate just allows you legal access to everything that's there. . Of course, once you have that, neighborhood riding is ok. Most of the kits are very simple and dont add much weight. Especially if your bike already has a battery.

It's been amazing after the state let us do this. It's tough for the hikers to complain about you tearing up trails if your 450sx is street legal. One of my neighbors has a street legal 2019 ktm 450 factory edition. Like this. As street legal as a goldwing, but probably not as comfortable.
 

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Our street legal is more" tongue in cheek" street legal. We have mountains that are controlled by the forest service. You cant touch , or cross, any of their dirt roads without being street legal. So, you add those barely street legal kits, and then its ok . We have plated Quads and every RZR I've seen is street legal. It's silly, to be honest, but it opens up the options. The valley is hot in the summer. The mountains will be 70 degrees. The west desert doesnt require anything to be legal, but all bikes have to run spark arrestors. The fine for not having one is 300.00.

Most still haul their bikes , or side-by-side to the mountain destinations. The plate just allows you legal access to everything that's there. . Of course, once you have that, neighborhood riding is ok. Most of the kits are very simple and dont add much weight. Especially if your bike already has a battery.

It's been amazing after the state let us do this. It's tough for the hikers to complain about you tearing up trails if your 450sx is street legal. One of my neighbors has a street legal 2019 ktm 450 factory edition. Like this. As street legal as a goldwing, but probably not as comfortable.
I guess it just depends on where you live. I like to ride in NH where many parts of the state you are allowed to ride on the roads to get from one trail to another or to get gas or even pizza. You just need to have a sticker to ride on their trails and roads where permitted. I believe they recently opened up the whole northern part of the state to allow off road bikes, atvs, and snow mobiles to ride from place to place.

BTW...is that an exc in that pic? Thats what i would want if I lived where you do.
 

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I think the rules here are silly, but as they say, be careful what you wish for. Your rules make sense. It's what they should have done here. That was within the spirit of what was needed. In the old days, they used common sense. Sure, crossing the road was illegal, but the rangers looked the other way. At some point, that all changed.

The mountains make up 1/2 of our available riding areas, so you damn near are forced to get that plate. If you go to my granddaughters high school, you will see several rzr's and BIG kawasaki 4 wheelers in the parking lot. They have become small cars. No safety features, or airbags, but they are legal.

Seriously, should a rule exist that allows my yz250 2 stroke to go on the freeway? That's stupid, but I could do it here.
 

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Some bikes don't even need a kit. I plated my Beta 300RR with only a mirror needed to be added. The inspection station was surprised when I showed him the DOT marking on the very dirt looking knobby tires.

Other states are more strict, but TX is still pretty lax.
 
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