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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I just bought my new 2013 N1k,

I saw a China made lowering link at a very good price.

Will it be worth it? or should I wait and buy a good brand?
 

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Why are you lowering it? Its not a tall bike. Its foolish to own a sport-ish bike, then lower it and make it handle like a cruiser. I've seen 5'3" inch ladies ride ninja 1000 and they dont lower them.
 

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Why are you lowering it? Its not a tall bike. Its foolish to own a sport-ish bike, then lower it and make it handle like a cruiser. I've seen 5'3" inch ladies ride ninja 1000 and they dont lower them.
Dude, can't be outdone by the Busa brotherhood:D

Probably can get a good deal on some accent lighting in China too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why are you lowering it? Its not a tall bike. Its foolish to own a sport-ish bike, then lower it and make it handle like a cruiser. I've seen 5'3" inch ladies ride ninja 1000 and they dont lower them.
Let me guess... you are tall.
Its the only people that make that comment.

The other type of people are the ones that don't mind dropping the bike a few times.

So, again, Is a $36 bike link worth it or should I go for the $124?
 

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No, I have short legs. Pants are 30 in inseam, and my brain has a huge desire to not turn modern bikes into harleys.

The part in questions is two pieces of aluminum. Odds of it being good, or bad?

Ricky Carmichael was 5'5" @and won world championships with bikes that had 39 inch seat heights.

The idea here is not to be col, or be tall. Its about realizing modern motorcycles have higher seat heights. They know this scares riders. They offer cruisers for those people. Im 5'9".

This "both feet on the ground" is from an old Harley campaign. It started in the mid 70's. Harley was going down the drain and had to sell horrible bikes. Their only way to do this was to say the jap bikes were too tall, thus you were unsafe unless both feet could touch.

My mom was 5'4" , 135lbs and rode a kz 900. No, she never dropped it, or lowered it.

The rest realize something has to give. Yea, the bike is tall. Yes, it has good suspension. No, its tough to have both at the same time.

If you rode it once, you can learn to be comfortable with it, and thats free. Much less costly than putting an exhaust pipe into the ground on a turn.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
LOL you made my point... 5'9' is tall, specially compared to shorter people.

You guys have no idea the suffering of trying to move the bike, or the effort and exhaustion after a long ride, yes every single time you stop you have to fight with the weight of the bike, and the anxiety of finding the right spot to place you feet, and the many times the tip of the feet can't find the road as there is a dip or imperfection and you almost fall.

As for the N1K, I think if the bike is lowered 1" front and back It would keep the suspension near stock (although 1.5" front the front would improve it).
Also found that if the pedal rest was in a different position I would have more reach, not sure if this can be accomplished...
 
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Hey man it's your bike, if you want to lower it...... well then lower it...lol

RC grew up in an era when we learned to make it work, and that often meant learning to adapt yourself to the situation...lol

I am also 5 foot 9. I have a seargent seat that (at least to me) makes the bike seem taller when trying to put the legs down. Plus I have stiffer springs and I raised the rear so it would turn better and I have a 190/55 rear.

I can literally only tippy toe with one foot at a light. It really makes it a pain to back up while on the bike. I can do it for sure, but I am going to lower it when I do my fork seals so it's a little easier to deal with, and maybe a little better at the Drag Strip:)

As for the original question, I have no idea. I have no pic and no info to go by to be honest. I have installed several lowering links by (I believe) PSR and they are very high quality. I like the threaded lowering links much better than the ones with different sets of holes. I can adjust them with out removing any bolts, they are stronger, and have a much wider range of adjustment.
 

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That makes sense in moving the bike, for sure. I grew up on dirt bikes. They were all too tall, regardless of how tall you were. Within a few rides, it was a non issue.

The part that alarmed me was taking our stock suspension, and making it worse.

I used a t rex link to make the back higher. It was well built. Obviously, lower or higher was an easy adjustment away. T Rex Kawasaki 2010 2015 Z1000 2011 2015 Ninja 1000 Raising lowering Link | eBay

Despite what the specs say, fork travel on our stock bikes is 108mm. Supposed to be 120, but its not. 108 -25 equals something I'd need a calculator for, but will be rather short.

Lets use my concours 14 as an example. Big, wide seat, and tall. Even if your feet touch the ground well, if you push, they slip. The bike is too heavy to move with feet power. You end up looking like special needs Fred Flintstone. Smoke pouring from the souls of your shoes, bike just sits there.

If you get really good at slow riding, this touch the ground stuff becomes much less of a factor. The biggest secret is to use your rear brake. Not to stop, but to regulate slow, slow speed. Dragging just a bit of rear brake makes it so you can comfortably operate the bike at way less than a walking pace. Give it a try, you will be surprised.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
5'6"....
Yes, I understand, it is my first liter....
I once rented a Big Big Harley, and the weight was incredible, even flat foot on the ground was difficult to get used to, but yes after a day it was all good.
I guess overtime will get better.
Still plan to lower the front a bit as they say will turn faster.

Also read from someone here about the pedals from a zx6r able to fit and if thats the case, I might have better footing...
Will try the rear brakes for better control and practice at slower speeds more often.
Bike still has 112 miles, can't push it, then again I only have 111.5 miles with her :)
 

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Yeah, just give it some time first before spending money on it. Whenever I get a new bike, I take it to a parking lot, and just do very slow speed maneuvers until it feels natural. I also get a feel for the brakes at that time too(emergency stops, brake feel and the like). Doesn't take long at all. You'll find this bike rolls around very easily despite it's weight.

And yes, the Zx6r pegs will fit. That'll just give you a bit more leg room, and a different feel for your feet.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I will. I have been using it non stop, until it hurts, now I know what to buy LOL.

What year are those pegs?
 

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Get some good boots. Thick rubber sole, and give yourself a chance.

You are plenty tall, and deserve a chance at a decent handling bike.

The low speed instability I get. I swear, 10 minutes practice, dragging the rear brake, and you'll be u turning in your garage. When you master that, we'll mention adding a touch of front in. Once you do that, you'll be annoyed if your foot goes down for stop lights.

The lowering idea helps a person believe they can catch the bike, if it tips, when going slow.

In reality, do the math on 700lbs, 5mph, and a 4 foot fall. Hopefully their shoe slips before their knee catches the weight.

Also, in the next few miles, seat, and suspension will break in. Bike will sag more, just breaking in.

I like your attitude. You sould like that person who puts though into what you do.

You would not take that bike and go to a racetrack, tonight, and see how soon you can do 150. It takes practice to go fast. So, why do we never see practice going slow mentioned?
 

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Dan, secret 2.


This bike carries its fuel super high. Running off the bottom 3 gallons of fuel makes this bike feel 50lbs lighter as opposed to the top 3
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well, I spend 3 hours installing the Chinese one ($30) ... but lacking a good control jack, ended up lowering the bike 4 inches, Harley style, was tired but put back the original wishbone. seemed the suspension colapsed and stayed that way...

Will definitely try again later, definitely need to lower it. this is a 1000 bike, extremely heavy to move and control (specially tipitoering ).
Just got the sliders just in case.
 

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Take that lowering energy, and focus it on slow bike control. You don't need both feet down. My right knee is all goofed up. It's not left a footing inot a long while.

When you master this skill, nothing is heavy or too hard to handle. I found it empowering, to be honest, and it all starts with using the rear brake as a slow speed aid. Not for stopping, for stabilization.

My concourse 14 weighs almost 700lbs. My passenger is 150 (she says). I'm 190.

Do you seriously think my legs (12 knee surgeries) are strong enough to steady this mess?
 

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I'm tall-ish, at 6'0. But I'm super skinny. A whopping 140lbs. If I can move this thing around with ease, then anyone can. Granted, I'm not the weakling I once was, but I'm still average in strength at best. A 200lb dude that doesn't even work out will still be able to out lift me by a lot, yet I can still move these bikes around just as easily, in dirt, on an incline no less. Don't fear the weight or height of these things. Heck, I can barely tip-toe my WR250 with one foot! And yet, I can do whatever I want on that thing just as easily as I could that little TW200 I started out on.

Just practice. That's all it takes. RC is not BS'ing here. Early on when I was learning to ride, I spent tons of time just crawling through parking lots, and practicing low speed stuff, first in open spaces, then in tight spaces, like cramped, busy parking garages. I'm talking riding around at the speed of an elderly person's walk here. Every time I get a new bike, I repeat this until I can do this without thought. It doesn't take long now mind you, but early on it took some time. I understand it's intimidating right now, and you don't want to drop your new baby(who does?). But it gets easier!
 

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Novak, with the cost of speeding being so high, I've learned to enjoy the slow practice.

I rode alongside my granddaughter as she walked the dog. The idea was I could not pass her. It's hard for the first 5 minutes, then no big deal.

Lowering is awesome until a sturdy part of the exhaust hits the ground.
 
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