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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone tried attaching one of these digital sag measurement devices to the rear axle of a N1K?

Are there any problems with muffler clearance?

www.motool.co
 

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I was going to post, " I wish we had a few of us, in a small area. It would be a good tool to share in a group."

That's a great thought, but if Rikifumi lived down the street, we would not need the tool. I like it, and thought about ordering one.

I THINK our pipes sweep up enough to clear the lower part. Also, my thought was that the measuring string would still be accurate if you flexed it around the pipe. Once it found zero, that bend becomes meaningless??
 

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But Why

Great example of a website that doesn’t explain what the purpose of the product is.
 

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I see what you are saying. The video is shot with the perspective that we already know why we want it. It's a great product. It's only issue is cost, and here's why.

In order for your bike to handle properly, and for your suspension to function properly, the fork and shock need the correct amount of sag. You get this proper sag by adding or subtracting preload. If you mess up the preload settings, or never set them, your bike will never handle as it was designed to. The factory cant set it, accurately, because none of us are the same weight.

For our Ninjas, and most other bikes, 30-35 mm of sag is a great start point. Let's call it 30mm for this example. Here's the problem. You need the suspension to settle 30mm while you are sitting on the seat.

How the f do you do that, alone? How can you use a tape measure, on your front fork, while your *** has to be on the seat? Or the rear, for that matter.

This tool eliminates the friend with the tape measure. If you always have access to someone witha tape measure, no need for this tool. If you have not set this, on your bike, Google, "setting race sag" and you will find several videos.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Slacker sent me a drawing of the V2, with dimensions- see below.

Even if the Slacker fit, to get real value out of it you need a Baxley Chock or similar. Right now I don't, so a buddy and the digital tape measure will do. My measuring points will be from a horizontal seam in the tail panel (where it meets the undertail piece) down to a stub of hex key that I'll insert into the axle eccentric. The tape measure body is perched atop that stub for repeatable results.
 

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I did not think about that, but that's true. Without a way to hold the bike up, that did not involve its suspension, the measurement is worthless. Damn. Now were at 400.00.....
 

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Also, if you do use a chock, you need a way to elevate the rear of the bike to be level in the chock otherwise you mess with the front to back center of gravity of thr bike. I had a suspension guy at the track check my sag one time and he used a Baxley chock. I questioned him about it and he said it was not an issue. It was what I had for that track day, so I went with it. A couple weeks later I had two friends help me set sag on that same bike. One was holding the bike upright, I was on the bike, the other was measuring. Guess what, they found quite different numbers for sag, both front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The chassis pitch will change the measurements a little bit, but the suggested settings are typically a range of values which you must still validate by riding. To me it's more important to be consistent in the methodology.
 

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I was able to use a cheap mirror and do fairly well. Fasten the tape measure with o rings and duct tape. Highlight the section, on the tape I hoped to be within.

I know this is a step above foolish. Maybe below for thinking it worked? No, really, it was semi ok. It was not accurate, but it was repeatable enough to make a decision on more/less.....more so that saying I wanted a specific 30mm.

Front was pretty accurate because I had the fork travel indicator. Purchased from wal-mart.com...no ****, really. I ordered, through them, to see if it really arrived. I was able to carefully climb on and let the indicator settle. I did that a few times and used an average. It's crazy, I know, but it ended up working pretty well, give or take 5mm.

Here's the 41mm indicator, and I did have to remove the whole damn fork leg to Install it.

We need a cheaper way to do this. For 400, I can hire a lady who works per half hour, a few times. That's too much.
 

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Wow, Marchesini wheels, you happy with the price/performance?
 

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Also, if you do use a chock, you need a way to elevate the rear of the bike to be level in the chock otherwise you mess with the front to back center of gravity of thr bike. I had a suspension guy at the track check my sag one time and he used a Baxley chock. I questioned him about it and he said it was not an issue. It was what I had for that track day, so I went with it. A couple weeks later I had two friends help me set sag on that same bike. One was holding the bike upright, I was on the bike, the other was measuring. Guess what, they found quite different numbers for sag, both front and rear.
I have a Baxley I used to transport my track bike and had the same concern as you did regarding the bike not being level. I measured how much the chock raised the front wheel from the garage floor, then used a rear paddock stand to lift the back and put a board under the rear tire to raise it to as close the front height as possible. Close enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It was during a summer WSMC event at Willow Springs where I saw an overheated rider returning to his paddock canopy after racing. His smoking hot, bikini clad, high maintenance supermodel girlfriend never got out of the recliner to help her guy with the rear stand. This was before the Baxley was invented...who knows, maybe that rider came up with the idea. Necessity is the mother of invention!
 

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The chassis pitch will change the measurements a little bit, but the suggested settings are typically a range of values which you must still validate by riding. To me it's more important to be consistent in the methodology.
Ricki, I'm not being a smartass here, as is easy to accuse me of.

My understanding of sag is that is the starting point for all the other adjustments. I know it's a range, but a puny 5mm variable. My understanding is that it is to set the leg into the starting position of the static travel.

What would cause you to change this based upon riding? Too much or too little travel at that point would be compression damping based upon travel amount. Rebound is feeling of the fork response after compression.

How would you know how and where to adjust this beyond static settings?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In my simple terms, setting sag puts the suspension in an optimum position (i.e. ride height) to deal with bumps and droop (extension) in the proper proportions. For road use I don't want so much ride height that there is real risk of topping out, for me these are quite unpleasant events. For the track, maybe I want more ride height (less sag) to keep hard parts off the deck when cornering. Damping tunes these movements to minimize chassis and tire disturbances and improve rider control.

Tuners always say, "Now go ride it!” What I'm after is a feeling of smooth sailing and a calm brain at speed. Getting bounced around, eyes jittering, on an edgy unbalanced bike is not relaxing for me and does not create speed. It creates chaos and the desire to park it! Stuff needs to reach this quiet mental zone and then I'm good. If someone else's "magic" numbers are magic for me it's quite a coincidence!
 

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