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If your occupation is testing motorcycles there’s a certain measure of accepted risk that comes with the job. When cornering ABS (C-ABS) arrived a couple years ago, the general consensus among the motojournos was, Hey that’s awesome, we’ll take your word for it working as described, because no matter how professional we try to be, grabbing a fistful of front brake mid-corner to evaluate this new technology is a line few were willing to cross. Just thinking of the action conjures images of impacting asphalt at a rate approaching lightspeed.

Attending the International Driver & Rider Training Symposium provided Kevin Duke and I the opportunity to safely explore C-ABS and all the mid-corner braking performance the technology promises to deliver. The result? Confirmation that we were not being lied to, and an elevated respect for the engineers and test riders who perfect this technology prior to making it available to OEMs for inclusion on the latest and greatest two-wheelers.

With a KTM 1190 Adventure outfitted with Cedergrens’ Skidbike contraption, Duke and I set to the task of crashing. Repeatedly, we failed. Grabbing a fistful of brakes while leaned over with the C-ABS functioning resulted with a rapidly decelerating motorcycle, and – once the initial I-shouldn’t-be-doing-this gag reflex was muted – no drama. Switching off C-ABS and replicating the act resulted as you’d expect, with the front wheel washing away, but minus the crash due to Skidbike’s outriggers catching our falls.
Read more about the MO Tested: Cornering ABS at Motorcycle.com.
 

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This was actually an interesting read about cornering ABS (C-ABS) when you read the main story. Here is a very good quote from it.

"“Had I not found a career testing motorcycles,” Duke opines, “I could imagine myself being one of those know-it-all riders who scoff on multiple forums and social-media platforms at modern electronic rider aids, claiming that expert riders like myself could do a better job feeling out available grip with carefully trained fingers than a Bosch computer could. And I’d be very wrong. Not only could I not outperform C-ABS under ideal conditions, in an unexpected panic situation such as occurs on public roads, I’d be on the ground wincing from another broken clavicle.”"
 

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Wander if it still stands you up when you hit the abs breaks in a corner
 

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Ill bet its all true, and it is awesome. This technology is perfect on my wifes car.

Yamaha has technology that will save every rider because a robot can ride the bike, for you as you sit and watch.

I bought a motorcycle so I could do the work. Im not in a race, and often times not even going somewhere I needed to go.

I would caution anyone that is finding the need to apply abs activating pressures, in corners. Uh, if this is your game plan, it wont be a sliding tire that causes your crash.
 

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racannon, you seem to be missing the point.
This is a safety feature.

It's like airbags ... in the old days we used to get a concussion when we crashed ... now we're going soft & let the airbag take all the impact.

It's not because you have cornering ABS that you should use it.
You shouldn't be braking harder while going into a corner, you should be braking less towards the apex.
But once you need to do that because of something UNEXPECTED happening ... you'd be glad you're no loosing your line that much and have a bigger chance of getting out of it, even if you have to brake really hard.

That has nothing to do with the bike doing the work for you, as most pro's won't even be able to do this. (keeping the line, not loosing your front tire, and +- panic brake).
This is all about keeping the bike intact when the worst situations could happen.
 
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No, no point missed at all, for me. I grew up jumping things because they were there. Crossing fields because I wanted to. This was always more about fun, getting better, developing skills.

Racers will find a way to use the technology to make them faster. Traction control will eliminate a need for throttle control, and no doubt this is a step in that direction for brakes.

Its brand new technology, and people trust it just because they said so. I do know one thing I learned was to not panic when I lost a front tire, and braking wont work when I do. With this feature, when I tried to lock the brake, while cornering, it wont let me....huh?

Its not a traction creator. It, hopefully, wont allow someone to lock up a front brake, while cornering.....and thats it. It wont offer traction when none is there.

I dont know how many uears, or miles, or different bikes, but theres never been a time when I would have activated it.

Im sure you can see these features are being added so anyone can use this product, and I always thought it was cool when not everyone could.
 

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As far as safety. This feature is on the safety list. Its below abs, and maybe ahead of traction control....Maybe these are number 3 and 6 on the 1 to 10 list.

Number 1 needed to be finding a computer to keep cars from hitting us. Until we solve that, dont fall for the fake safety idea because this feature wont do anything for overall rider safety.
 

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Without prejudice. In my view a safety feature has to be evaluated by its ability to save lives regardless of experience . Experience is often gained at some cost unfortunately in some cases the ultimate. I did not consider linked brakes as a safety feature until several years ago it definitely saved me from a serious accident.Quite a few will contest that view but I am here now,not in a box. I will always remember the cartoon years ago of two old boaties watching a chap lose his boat at a ramp,when one ridiculed the rookie the other one said "Yes Bill, just like you did forty years ago!" Some of us lucky ones learned from experience and had a second chance,some unfortunately do not, so in my view every safety feature has merit. Even the change from the gear lever on the tank to foot operation has had a dramatic effect.
 

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Don, you made a great point. Linked brakes and safety. The only way linking them can help is if a rider is not using a front, or rear brake to stop. Linking brings one online that the rider did not intend to use. Several older bikes linked them without even having an abs computer.

So, how is that a plus? Ive seen many cruiser riders use the rear brake only. Its either a lack of skill, or knowledge when they dont use that front brake. Not saying you did this, just an example.

Is a lack of skill, or knowledge something fixable with electronics? Shoukd it be fixed that way?

France had many years of a 100hp power limit preventing excessive speed. That sounds way more safe than linked brakes.

Linked brakes would be easier to argue FOR than cornering abs.
 

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I know it seems to be taking or reducing the skills needed for riders or drivers and there will be some resistance but I am sure the latest electronics on bikes that are coming out will save lives.I don't think there is a day spent riding that brings us ( particularly bikers) close to an incident that involves an unskilled or inattentive driver. Top quality cars now have more electronics than I can describe to reduce accidents on corners ,crossing white lines,avoiding pedestrins , close proximity automatic raking.etc, and they will spread into motor bikes more as time goes by. There is no doubt in my mind that many older bikers will not want/need them but there will a fair number that will be advantaged by them.I remember cars and trucks all had crash gearboxes ,there are very few modern drivers that could change down on a crash box. In my day,hopefully I haven't lost it, it was an art.
 

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Don, great points, but these devices also bring out unintended consequences. Im sure you saw the guy sleeping while driving the Tesla. Or, a trip anywhere and seeing folks play on their phones. A manual transmission makes it tough to text with.


I do see a few say, " Wow.I dont have to steer. This lets me watch for hazards....." Most will be, "I dont have to steer, wheres my phone."

Obviously, the motorcycles will go the same was as cars did. For me, I am ok on not owning a gen 1 cornering abs....in a few years, this may be perfected. Ill trust it then, and see what else it might allow.

I believe motorcycle riding is a activity where they will find its not a great idea to attract casual users, or people not able to reach an adiquate skill level. When the casual users start dying, its always brought media attention. This happened back in 1999, but a dying economy took care of the problem.
 

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The single best safety feature is the one that induces the rider/driver to be fully engaged in the riding/driving experience, and be 100% focused on that act. All else is a band-aid for the absence of that.
 

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Rock, thats it.

I saw a post,a few weeks back, on the c14 forum. Topic was, "Best way to downshift"

Answer was, "Who cares. The slipper will be ready."

It is 100 true, but god help the poor person who tries a non slipper equipped machine? What then? Slippers for one and all? Or, what if the clutch failed lime exp matters bike was ready to do?
 

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Assuming the clutch works but you can't disengage it, then the same way I did a car when the clutch master cylinder failed. Started it in gear and stalled it at light if I had to stop. Not easy but i got 500 miles like this.

I avoided heavy traffic as best I could and rev-matched like in the old days when you had to double clutch to make it work smoothly. Bikes are a definitely bit easier to shift once moving anyway.
 

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I can understand skilled riders shying away from very advanced features,because I guess they would prefer to rely on their honed skills rather than some one else, and I guess the satisfaction they get on their rides is what it is all about.So far there has been many options, I wonder how long it will be before they become standard.
 

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Ill bet it wont be even 5 years. I dont believe any of these electronic parts are expensive....expennsive like high end brembo calipers.
 

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Yeah, much like ABS is on everything, and now TC seems to be creeping in everywhere, I"m sure once the cutting edge companies who pioneered this tech take the R&D hit it will be standard in a few years.
 

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I think we can all agree that this technology, can and will, save lives. At the same time, it doesn't eliminate the need to understand how things would normally work should these systems fail.

It is a good idea to learn your bike first by disengaging these systems if you can to see how it reacts. Just like doing stopping drills. Try just the front, rear and together and so on. Sometimes the first time someone tries a panic stop is the time when it matters the most. I always find some place to test out my bike in a controlled environment so I know what to expect should that cager dart out in front me.

That is one thing I'll give BMW credit for, they tend to push the envelope a bit but it also helps them iron things out and have a closer to seamless implementation. What I do like a lot on the XR is they are ALL defeatable, traction control, wheelie control, cornering ABS and cornering ABS. So if you want to track the bike, not an issue. By default (for liability reasons) when you shut the bike off, the re-engage upon startup and you can cancel them quite easily again. Why don't more companies do this? On the N1k, you can defeat the traction control but not the ABS as far as I could tell.
 
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