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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Like the title says, I would like to run a camera setup.

I would like the set and forget type of always on built-in, but I have not found a good system for the ninja.

In the past I have used Yi Action camera (velcroed onto my chest), but the you have to control it, charge it, battery and memory are very limited, etc...

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.

Finally, I am currently running the kawi heated grip kit, a dual usb socket (rarely in use), garmin, and gerbing heated clothes all on the bikes electrical system. I want to add these cameras as well as one front driving light. Could all of this be too much of a draw?
 

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He did a very good job with his almost invisible installation of the camera
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

He did a very good job with his almost invisible installation of the camera
Thanks, any opinion in the quality of the video?
 

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As far as the electrical draw, it sounds like you are pushing the limit.

I believe you can check this with a meter. Set it to DC volts. Turn all of your accessories on, including high beam on the lights.

With the bike idiling, see what the meter says when you touch the battery. If you are below 12.5, or so, it's a problem. If you can hold the 12.5, you'll be ok. If you overload the system, the 12.5 will fall, fast. Dont let the bike sit and idle for extended periods of time. Make your check, give it a minute, or two, then shut the bike off.

If I remember correctly, Kenors said we had 100W as extra to power our accessories, but that was on the pre- ride by wire bikes. Those have led lights, so Kawasaki could have de-rated the system with that in mind.

 

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Nice information RC. I just got a few measurements with my accessories. I know the Innovv K3 pulls less than 1 amp (it uses a 1 amp fuse). The Clearwater Darla's pull 4 amps (48 watts) for the pair at high power. I rarely use them on high because they are quite bright even when the volume is turned down. One other note is I don't use high beams anyway with the Darla's as they provide more than adequate light. With the low voltage cut-off built into the heated grips you get kind of safety built in. At idle with all accessories on (on high where applicable), I get a reading that bounces between 12.4 and 12.5. Since I don't use the high beams I'm sitting at 12.7 volts worst case. So it looks like the 2021's still have some power to spare for accessories.

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I haven't chimed in here because I don't have knowledge on the newest Ninja series but in general you need to get a voltmeter hooked up to monitor the state of your charging system and battery. I suspect the power available is very similar to the '17-'19 series which is about 15-20W more than the '11-'16 series. (Same charging system, LED headlights draw less power.) But you really won't know unless you monitor the system how your battery/charging system is performing.

I run a Gerbing heated jacket (77W), heated grips (30W max), GPS, Radar detector (few watts) fairly comfortably but I do switch off the high beams at stoplights. If you have the full Gerbing gear (pants, gloves, socks) you'll be stressing the system. If you add a strong light, LED or not, you'll have to be very careful and keep an eye on the charging system. As RC mentioned, anything below ~12.5 is bleeding your system. Definitely make sure everything is on a switched circuit.

Winter time hint: If you spend any time idling, adjust your idle up a few hundred RPM. 1500-1600 RPM makes a big difference over 1200 RPM.
 

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If you dig through the part numbers, kawasaki changed the flywheel (rotor) and the stator, with each generation. The part number changed, but doesnt mean the part changed its spec.

What is interesting is that the newest ninja 1000, the 2020, shares its flywheel/rotor with the z900, but the stator isnt the same as the z900. The z900rs, which suited that one guys needs, uses a different flywheel and stator, than the z900. It appears all of these pieces interchange, but I cant imagine them stocking so many parts if they were all identical. The only superceded part is on the 11-13 bikes. They show that an updated stator fits it. It changed from it original 21003-0096 to a 21003-0122. That tells us this system is mostly the same from 2011-2015. After than, who knows?

These systems are bery basic. They mostly run at full power, all the time. The bike needs to use that power, and leave a little in reserve to charge with and run the lights.

Unless you are me, you dont drive around with the turn signal on, all the time. Switching those to low energy use led isnt a big deal. The headlight probably isnt, either, but if you were Kawasaki trying to re-decorate a 10 year old platform, switching it to led might be reason enough to down rate the system. Especially because the bike will feel lighter, and handle better with the smallest flywheel you can put on it. Even a -1oz difference would be felt by anyone.

Downgrading it by 20 or 30w would have been a worthwhile change, except for those who want a ton of accessories.
 

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I didn't see a mention of model year Ninja 1000 yours is. Depending on that, there are a few places you can reduce some amp draw. First one I always do, pretty much as soon as I get a new bike rolled into my garage is replacing the license plate bulb. The typical incandescent license plate bulb is 5w or a bit more, which isn't much, but it's still a 0.4A constant draw. Replace it with an LED bulb costs very little and basically cuts that amp draw down next to nothing. Plus the white light looks way better and increases your night-time conspicuity.

I don't usually bother with turn signal LED conversion, unless they double as position lights and are ON most of the time. If you are teeter-tottering at the R/R output limit, then it might be worth considering. It's easy enough to change them to LEDs, as long as you swap the stock flasher relay with an electronic one compatible with LEDs.

Anyhow, your voltage draw chart looks okay to me. Like you said, you likely won't ever have the aux light and/or high beam ON while idling at a stop light. Watching your battery voltage is a definitely a good idea, but depending on what charge state (or how healthy) your battery happens to be, a particular voltage reading could mean different charge/discharge condition. An ammeter tells a much more direct story. A clamp meter is an excellent garage tool to have. A decent one isn't all that expensive, especially considering the kind of money folks are willing to throw at aftermarket goodies, not to mention the bike(s) themselves.
 

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I didn't see a mention of model year Ninja 1000 yours is. Depending on that, there are a few places you can reduce some amp draw. First one I always do, pretty much as soon as I get a new bike rolled into my garage is replacing the license plate bulb. The typical incandescent license plate bulb is 5w or a bit more, which isn't much, but it's still a 0.4A constant draw. Replace it with an LED bulb costs very little and basically cuts that amp draw down next to nothing. Plus the white light looks way better and increases your night-time conspicuity.

I don't usually bother with turn signal LED conversion, unless they double as position lights and are ON most of the time. If you are teeter-tottering at the R/R output limit, then it might be worth considering. It's easy enough to change them to LEDs, as long as you swap the stock flasher relay with an electronic one compatible with LEDs.

Anyhow, your voltage draw chart looks okay to me. Like you said, you likely won't ever have the aux light and/or high beam ON while idling at a stop light. Watching your battery voltage is a definitely a good idea, but depending on what charge state (or how healthy) your battery happens to be, a particular voltage reading could mean different charge/discharge condition. An ammeter tells a much more direct story. A clamp meter is an excellent garage tool to have. A decent one isn't all that expensive, especially considering the kind of money folks are willing to throw at aftermarket goodies, not to mention the bike(s) themselves.
It's a 2021. The MD fender eliminator came with an LED tag light so I'm good there. Also replaced the turn signals with the Rizoma Light Unit S (3 function, brake, tail, and indicator). The tail light function draws 1 watt for the pair. Already looking for a digital voltmeter to mount on the dash. Always good to have realtime information.A clamp meter sounds like a good addition to the tool box. Thanks.
 

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If you dig through the part numbers, kawasaki changed the flywheel (rotor) and the stator, with each generation. The part number changed, but doesnt mean the part changed its spec.
...<snip>...
Downgrading it by 20 or 30w would have been a worthwhile change, except for those who want a ton of accessories.
Or just to stay warm. 🥶
 
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Finally, I am currently running the kawi heated grip kit, a dual usb socket (rarely in use), garmin, and gerbing heated clothes all on the bikes electrical system. I want to add these cameras as well as one front driving light. Could all of this be too much of a draw?
I would like to see how you added the Gerbing connection. Wondering about a good place for a hard plug mount position on the bike
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would like to see how you added the Gerbing connection. Wondering about a good place for a hard plug mount position on the bike
I'll post this in a few, going to plug everything and check the volt meter and take some pictures.
 

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Kenors, I think I've asked this 7 or 8 times before, so forgive me.

Do we have a way to confirm the alternator output? I know we say 335 on the old bike. That was in the manual. The same manual that said we had a 190/55 rear tire.
 

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Kenors, I think I've asked this 7 or 8 times before, so forgive me.

Do we have a way to confirm the alternator output? I know we say 335 on the old bike. That was in the manual. The same manual that said we had a 190/55 rear tire.
Not as far as I know. My own guestimate of available power comes from watching the voltmeter while I'm adding accessories. In the earlier bikes ('11-'16) at a little over 100W or so you could see the charging voltage start to drop sharply. On my '18 it seems to do better and I have maybe an extra 20W or so. I assumed it was because of the LED headlamps and the output power of the alternator was the same as before.

Alternator output power varies with speed and Kawasaki's 335W number came specifically at 4k rpm. The power the bike uses increases a bit with RPM so it's hard to put a hard number on exactly how much accessory power you can get away with adding. If we fired up our bikes and always ran them at, say 4k rpm we could specify more precisely what you have available. But, particularly because we have small batteries, if you spend significant time idling/low rpm running you won't keep the battery fully charged if you're using the max theoretical power available. That's why I keep preaching "Get a voltmeter and watch it from time to time." Not only does it tell you if you're overloading the system, it gives you (often) advance warning when components in the system are failing.
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Couldn't find a Ninja specific curve but alternators are essentially the same shape of output curve.
 

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I would like to see how you added the Gerbing connection. Wondering about a good place for a hard plug mount position on the bike
You didn't ask me but...
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So, I owe some photos, but I wanted to share that I am getting very solid readings from the voltmeter (well above 12.5) at idle. This is not with everything running, but with Garmin and Gerbig in use. I tend to use the heated grips when I am not using gerbing, but it is not impossible.

EDIT: I similarly have the female gerbing connector coming up from the crotch; this is the most out of the way place and you can store it in the warmer months entirely.
 

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For my heated gear, I just use an adapter to plug into the charging pigtail, which I usually have peeking out under the rider seat. Around here, I hardly ever need heated gear, so it's not worth a dedicated outlet plug just for the handful of times out of a season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For my heated gear, I just use an adapter to plug into the charging pigtail, which I usually have peeking out under the rider seat. Around here, I hardly ever need heated gear, so it's not worth a dedicated outlet plug just for the handful of times out of a season.
I've done that in a pinch, but I'm in New York and ride through the year. I start using the vest and gloves, if not socks too, by January. It feels safer to have a dedicated fuse (which the pigtail obviously doesn't) for more ongoing use.
 

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I've done that in a pinch, but I'm in New York and ride through the year. I start using the vest and gloves, if not socks too, by January. It feels safer to have a dedicated fuse (which the pigtail obviously doesn't) for more ongoing use.
Actually, the pigtail from Gerbing has a fuse line built in. I didn't run it directly off the battery but off a switched relay. I ride all year as well and just tuck the wire back under the seat in the summer. The little velcro tab keeps it wire from being kinked and sat on.
I was a little concerned about longevity but my first one lasted >10 years before the insulation cracked and the socket went intermittent.

Not to plug them but they're another company that I really like. I bought my first suit from their original Union, WA factory (near me) in the mid 90's. 6-7 years later one of the arms stopped heating. They fixed it free. About 15 years in another arm panel failed and I had to mail it to Stone Mountain, NC for fixing (they moved, I paid to ship it). Got a call that there were 2 failed panels so the suit was considered totaled and what size would I like to receive! They sent me a complete new retail jacket kit, wiring and all with their new microwire technology. Gotta love that kind of service.

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I've done that in a pinch, but I'm in New York and ride through the year. I start using the vest and gloves, if not socks too, by January. It feels safer to have a dedicated fuse (which the pigtail obviously doesn't) for more ongoing use.
I don't install charging pigtails unless it has a fuse in it. I never bought one without a fuse. Granted you could buy... or even make one without a fuse in it, like cutting an SAE extension cord in half, which I have done, but I add on an inline fuse holder. Running a charge cord without a fuse is, frankly, asking for trouble IMO. Quite often the fuse that is included with generic charging pigtails has an amp rating that is a bit too high for my liking, so I change it out for one that is more appropriate for moto use.

 
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