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Discussion Starter #1
I read the 2014 manual and it talks about the number of clicks to make it softer and harder etc etc. It also says you can damage it if you turn it past the upper and lower limits.

My question is how the heck do you know for sure where it was set when you bought it???? There seems to be no possible way to visually check where it is actually set. On normal shocks you can easily see where it's at.

Am I missing something or are we just "shooting in the dark" when we adjust the rear preload?
 

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The manual should specify what setting the bike had when you bought it. Usually they will say something like, "six clicks out from fully bottomed..." or such.

According to this article, 33 turns in is the stock setting?


2014 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 ABS First Ride - Motorcycle USA

Keep one thing in mind. The shock springs are super stiff. In order for that little hand wheel to compress the spring, or not compress, you have to turn it man, many times.

If you take a few minutes to read through this article I'll post a link to, you can really take advantage of what the Ninja 1000 is all about. Settign up the suspension, for you, will make an incredible difference.

Motorcycle Suspension Set-up

The steps appear overwhelming, at first, but start with just making sure your bike has the right amount of RIDER sag, with you onboard.

Its one of those things that sounds complicated, until you do it.
 

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I had the same thought that you did when adjusting mine. I just backed it all way out and started counting as I turned it in. Same with the front suspension. Just backed everything all the way out and started over. I'm convinced that my dealership did nothing more than took the bike out of the crate, put a battery in it and stuck it on the show room floor. My bike was 1/2 quart low on oil when I picked it up, the front and rear suspension settings were all over the place and the front tire was about 7 pounds low on air.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
West Coast - You said you "backed it all the way out". How did you know when it was "backed all the way out"? Which direction did you turn it? Like I said the manual says not to turn it past the upper or lower limits but how do you know when you are there?

I may just leave it alone...the bike handles fine as it is.
 

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West Coast - You said you "backed it all the way out". How did you know when it was "backed all the way out"? Which direction did you turn it? Like I said the manual says not to turn it past the upper or lower limits but how do you know when you are there?

I may just leave it alone...the bike handles fine as it is.
On the rear adjustments I just backed the preload knob out all the way until it stopped (counter-clockwise). Didn't force anything, just did it gently. You can tell when it stops. Nothing damaged. Same with the rebound. Just gently turn the adjusting screw counter-clockwise until it stops. Once both are "zero'd" make your adjustments from there.

Same with the front. Using a flat blade screwdriver, turn the rebound counter-clockwise until it stops. Again, it just stops. No damage unless you force it. Then using a 19mm socket, turn the preload all the way out. Just go slow. (Count your turns, that way if you don't like the way all your adjustments turn out, you can always return it the way it was.) Once zero'd, make your adjustments from there.

There are several threads on here about suspension adjustments. I just followed what others had posted and adjusted mine to suit my riding style and body weight.
I was also going to leave mine "stock" because I felt that the bike handled fine but once I adjusted everything, I could tell a difference. Like I said in my previous post, I don't think my dealer did jack with my bike other than to take it out of the crate. My suspension adjustments were all over the map.

Don't worry, I was afraid to touch my bike too, but once I figured out what was going on with the adjustments, it really was simple. Just don't turn anything past the point where it stops on its own and you'll be fine.

Hope that helps.
 

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I took a different approach. I felt the bike was really nice from the showroom. I can reduce the chicken strips on the rear tire to good levels and do not need to re-align my spine when I hit pavement joins on the freeway.

I think you need to dial it in for what you do with it.

If it seams 'good' the way it is I would make minor corrections and try it. I turned the rear adjuster a whopping 1/4 turn to cover my wife's 110lbs and the bike was fine....but when I hit the freeway without her on it.. the pavement joins tried to catapult me. I restored the 1/4 turn and the joins were 'passive' again.

I am so happy with the bikes ride that I probably wont even touch the dampers unless I start pushing out in the twisties. In the twisties so far it has been very well behaved and no over the line excursions to report :).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
West Coast - Thanks for the reply. I'm not as worried about it after reading your post. I may play with it again this weekend.
 

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West Coast - Thanks for the reply. I'm not as worried about it after reading your post. I may play with it again this weekend.
Wondering if you ever played with the suspension adjustments and whether or not you like the results?
 
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