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Discussion Starter #1
I've loved this bike since I got it a couple years ago, but one thing that I've always had an issue with is the throttle response. It has always seemed so harsh to me. I even installed Ivan's FCE at the beginning of this season trying to find some way to smooth things out. I've found the throttle transitions in the corners to be disconcerting.

So last night I tried an experiment. And so far, I'm loving it. I turned up the idle speed screw and now have idle set around 1600 RPM, instead of the factory standard of 1100 RPM. And I have to say that I love the change. I've only done about 80 miles so far, but I don't see going back. Engine braking is significantly reduced, and roll-ons are significantly smoother. The reduced engine braking also means the back brake is actually useful for helping control lower speeds. Engine braking was so strong before it was redundant. Shifting is also significantly smoother as well.

The only downside I can see is possibly reduced MPG in traffic, and increased heat in traffic.
 

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I hated my bike due to all the engine braking, it's rediculous.

Just yesterday I installed a power commander, block off plates & Ivan remapped my ECU & it is just a whole different bike. I enjoy going into corners hard & downshifting & not worrying about being thrown off the bike.

I thas inspired my love & confidence in the bike again.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is exactly how I feel. I wasn't looking forward to spending all that money in the hopes that I could get it to behave better. Feeling great about riding this year.
 

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Thanks for posting, all. This is a very interesting conversation.

Last week I rode a 2015 Hayabusa and a 2015 GSXR-750. The former was smooth as butter, the latter so incredibly jerky that I actually got wretchedly motion sick. (I had a head injury some years back which I suspect has rendered my brain less resilient in dealing with sharp movements.) The 750 is a great bike, but I just wanted off because every micromovement on the throttle produced a leap or a sit-down. I think many riders love that, but I prefer smooth.

I was inclined to assess the matter as being about the bikes-- one smooth, one jerky-- but now I wonder if a similar adjustment of the idle speed screw could render either bike more to a given rider's taste?

(Certainly wrist control and increased skill on the bike would increase smoothness as well.)
 

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I've done a fair amount of riding since making that change at this point. I really have nothing but great things to say about it. Its a free mod, and made so many things better. Kicking myself for not trying this sooner, and on my last bike.
 

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Im Going to Give it a try. Thanks for the Tip
 

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Does the power commander option by itself fix the throttle abruptness or is just increasing the idle speed good enough of a solution?
 

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I've loved this bike since I got it a couple years ago, but one thing that I've always had an issue with is the throttle response. It has always seemed so harsh to me. I even installed Ivan's FCE at the beginning of this season trying to find some way to smooth things out. I've found the throttle transitions in the corners to be disconcerting.

So last night I tried an experiment. And so far, I'm loving it. I turned up the idle speed screw and now have idle set around 1600 RPM, instead of the factory standard of 1100 RPM. And I have to say that I love the change. I've only done about 80 miles so far, but I don't see going back. Engine braking is significantly reduced, and roll-ons are significantly smoother. The reduced engine braking also means the back brake is actually useful for helping control lower speeds. Engine braking was so strong before it was redundant. Shifting is also significantly smoother as well.

The only downside I can see is possibly reduced MPG in traffic, and increased heat in traffic.
I did this after I read your post and I am loving it. thanks for the info
 

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Thanks for the tip! I may try this as well! I've always struggled with jerky shifting; thought it was the clutch at first but I believe it is the on/off throttle response. It's almost like the throttle has a fraction of a second delay just long enough to mess up the shifts.
 

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that is weird, mine does not have the jerky shifting or engine braking issues. either i got really lucky or some people may need riding lessons or are used to small displacement bikes.
 

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MR, you are right. Humans are amazing with their ability to adapt to just about anything.

Ive seen dirt riders with bent bars. After a few hrs, bent bars feel good. Who cares, and why would you fix that? People with experience are better/worse in this regard. Often times they have ridden some real junk and their ability to adapt is unreal.

I also think some bikes are worse than others. Reason being is the tps setting. I dont believe its set all that accurate from the factory.
 

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I hated my bike due to all the engine braking, it's rediculous.

Just yesterday I installed a power commander, block off plates & Ivan remapped my ECU & it is just a whole different bike. I enjoy going into corners hard & downshifting & not worrying about being thrown off the bike.

I thas inspired my love & confidence in the bike again.
This is one of those things with each niche of bikes that has always puzzled me. On my old 08 VFR800 vtec engine, the jerky or snatchy throttle below 3k rpms was always an issue with low speed maneuvers. For me after doing a pair valve mod, flapper mod, and airbox mod the jerky, snatchy throttle response was still there with a placebo or pseudo fix. This bike had no fix & as many called it "character" was part of the design of the vtec v4 engine.

I supposed that the N1K harsh engine braking is part of its character with only a workaround instead of a real fix??
 

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I currently own a Ducati Diavel and I am interested in possibly adding a NK1. I have not ridden an NK1 but I thought an in-line 4 engine would produce a very smooth throttle response- a very linear power curve. After reading some of these posts, I am wondering if this maybe not true.

I know I need to go do a test ride to experience the NK1 for myself, but compared to other bikes you might have owned how does the NK1 compare in terms of smooth throttle response?
 

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It isn't the motor's fault, it is the ECU programming. For $350, you can send your ECU to Ivan and have it reflashed. From what I understand it totally transforms the bike with more hp, torque and very smooth throttle response. My ECU was sent out to be flashed and will be coming back this week and I can then personally speak in more detail about it.

I was generally not unhappy with the throttle response EXCEPT from 0-1/8th throttle. There is sort of an on/off effect to it in that range. Above 1/8th, it was generally good to every good. You can also put it in the low power mode (70% of max) and makes the bike very docile (but not slow).

All in all it is a very good bike and a lot of bang for the buck. The engine is very tractable and pulls well from just off idle all the way to redline. Once at 30 mph, I can pretty much just leave it in 6th gear. It will just pull smooth as can be. There is no real peak to the its pull. It starts good and just builds all they way up and doesn't really fall off at higher rpms.
 

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that is weird, mine does not have the jerky shifting or engine braking issues. either i got really lucky or some people may need riding lessons or are used to small displacement bikes.
I don't think it has anything to do with the displacement of the motor but rather the ECU as pointed out above. No matter how much power the bike has, the on/off throttle response from idle is a flaw. Throttle response should be linear right off the line. Ironically enough, I was giving the same critic on the H2. Without linear throttle response, it is much harder to ride a bike fast and smooth.
 

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Easier to ride = less fatigue = less "incidents" and ultimately you are faster

I've had too many bikes with a light switch for a throttle/powerband and while they might have been super fast, I was worn out after riding them for a bit on the track. Take them on the road and they were just waiting to bite me if I made a mistake.

I bought the N1K to be a fun, reasonably fast, low maintenance commuter/touring bike. My main complaints have been addressed. My ECU is on its way back so I can't wait to try it.
 

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I don't think it has anything to do with the displacement of the motor but rather the ECU as pointed out above. No matter how much power the bike has, the on/off throttle response from idle is a flaw. Throttle response should be linear right off the line. Ironically enough, I was giving the same critic on the H2. Without linear throttle response, it is much harder to ride a bike fast and smooth.
no it is called "needing improvement in rider skill". Every bike forum on the net has people making this on off throttle response about every bike made claim.

go join up on any bike form and do a search and you will find tons of these threads. Just like the silly "engine brake issue", weak rear brake, crappy clutch and so on.
 

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no it is called "needing improvement in rider skill". Every bike forum on the net has people making this on off throttle response about every bike made claim.

go join up on any bike form and do a search and you will find tons of these threads. Just like the silly "engine brake issue", weak rear brake, crappy clutch and so on.

You brought up a good point. As humans, we have the ability to adapt to all kinds of things. Bend your handlebars and go on a three hour ride. During the first 15 minutes, the bars feel bent. After three hours, your saying, man these are fine, There's no reason to fix the bars. I actually like them this way.

In all honesty, you've adapted to something thats not right, just as we do with the stock fueling, stock brakes and stock clutch on some bikes.

Some of its personal preference, but trusting those initial feelings of "its not right" is where the skill, and the secret lies.

If you watch the moto gp guys doing time trials, they are int he pits all the time for changes.

Theres no, "well, its me. I need to practice more, and improve my skills.

So, yes, we are not at their level, and thats the point. We need the bike to do what we want way more than they do.
 
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