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In 2017 I test rode one. Although I liked the riding position and build, I was used to smooth motorcycles so I did not buy one. Test rode a 21 demo and loved it, it was very smooth compared to the 17. Bought one, mine is also very smooth....love it its a great bike (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Added an UPDATE to the original posting about First Oil+Filter replacement.
 

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Seat comfort:
Now that I have tasted what the seat is really like on a decently long trip, I get to tell you. I would say that trips under 150 miles (i.e. under 2-3 hours) should be fine and quite comfortable.
Now, for an 8 hour trip, it was a different story. On the way there, it was fine and I had no pains or aches. We stopped twice in 173 miles. But, on the way back, butt starts to ache, knees were crying for help but surprisingly, not a lot of backaches. There were minor backaches but not a whole lot. I think for a long trip, I really need to stop more frequently so that riding does not turn into a chore. And, of course, the damn juicy summer bugs that kept colliding on helmet shield and messing up my vision reduced the pleasure of riding quite a bit in addition to the aches on the knees and butt.
I would recommend getting an upgrade on seat if you are really into long distance trips (300 miles or more); otherwise, you are going to pay for it.
I have a Sargent and Corbin in the "For Sale" section that might be worth a try to solve the seat issue. Both are like new!
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
I have a Sargent and Corbin in the "For Sale" section that might be worth a try to solve the seat issue. Both are like new!
Tried Sargent before and not convinced.
I think I'll keep the OEM seat for while since I do not do 300+ mile trips that often.
 

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Theres no reason to post guesses when the information is available. You are incorrect on the oil filter. Kawasaki installs those , at the factory. They would never allow the dealer to install the first filter. Is the filter too tight? Of course it is. Do you hear about new Kawasakis leaking oil, or having loose oil filters? I didnt think so. That's what they have to be concerned with....not removal. So, the filters are tight. They also tension the chain, set throttle cables as well as clutch cables. Why? The set up guy will screw this up.

The bike is also shipped with oil in it , for the same reason. Motorcycle set up is usually done by the least skilled guy in the shop. It's a mistake to ask him to do more than assemble a windshield, or put a wheel on, so they dont. Anymore the only things hes going to assemble will be related to packaging size.

Before the bike leaves the factory, its ran on a dyno to make sure it performs within range. They would rather mistakes be found at the factory and not sold to customers. Italy doesnt much worry about that, and it shows.

It's not a secret. In fact, Discovery channel had a 1 hour special , years ago. At 29:00, notice rhe zx6and old z 1000 on a dyno.

 

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Discussion Starter · #66 · (Edited)
Theres no reason to post guesses when the information is available. You are incorrect on the oil filter. Kawasaki installs those , at the factory. They would never allow the dealer to install the first filter. Is the filter too tight? Of course it is. Do you hear about new Kawasakis leaking oil, or having loose oil filters? I didnt think so. That's what they have to be concerned with....not removal. So, the filters are tight. They also tension the chain, set throttle cables as well as clutch cables. Why? The set up guy will screw this up.

The bike is also shipped with oil in it , for the same reason. Motorcycle set up is usually done by the least skilled guy in the shop. It's a mistake to ask him to do more than assemble a windshield, or put a wheel on, so they dont. Anymore the only things hes going to assemble will be related to packaging size.

Before the bike leaves the factory, its ran on a dyno to make sure it performs within range. They would rather mistakes be found at the factory and not sold to customers. Italy doesnt much worry about that, and it shows.

It's not a secret. In fact, Discovery channel had a 1 hour special , years ago. At 29:00, notice rhe zx6and old z 1000 on a dyno.

Understood.

The video is quite interesting. Looks like Discovery covered multiple Japanese motorcycle manufacturing assembly line quite a bit.
 

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Brakes:
Pull the pads and get a set of Vesrah pads on there. Remember to scotchbrite the rotors to get the old pad material off while the calipers are off. Bed the new pads in and it works wonders. Obviously, you would need a Brembo master to really improve things, but even pads alone make a huge difference. I like these calipers better than the Brembo's you had when setup the same.

The calipers on the N1K are the same as the non-Brembo calipers on the 15+ CBR1000RR. A great set of monoblocks. I use those CBR Tokiko calipers on my GSXR1000 and my ZX12R.
 

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Theres no reason to post guesses when the information is available. You are incorrect on the oil filter. Kawasaki installs those , at the factory. They would never allow the dealer to install the first filter. Is the filter too tight? Of course it is. Do you hear about new Kawasakis leaking oil, or having loose oil filters? I didnt think so. That's what they have to be concerned with....not removal. So, the filters are tight. They also tension the chain, set throttle cables as well as clutch cables. Why? The set up guy will screw this up.

The bike is also shipped with oil in it , for the same reason. Motorcycle set up is usually done by the least skilled guy in the shop. It's a mistake to ask him to do more than assemble a windshield, or put a wheel on, so they dont. Anymore the only things hes going to assemble will be related to packaging size.

Before the bike leaves the factory, its ran on a dyno to make sure it performs within range. They would rather mistakes be found at the factory and not sold to customers. Italy doesnt much worry about that, and it shows.

It's not a secret. In fact, Discovery channel had a 1 hour special , years ago. At 29:00, notice rhe zx6and old z 1000 on a dyno.

Based. I hear Anri Okita dynos all the bikes over 100 hp
31722
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 · (Edited)
Brakes:
Pull the pads and get a set of Vesrah pads on there. Remember to scotchbrite the rotors to get the old pad material off while the calipers are off. Bed the new pads in and it works wonders. Obviously, you would need a Brembo master to really improve things, but even pads alone make a huge difference. I like these calipers better than the Brembo's you had when setup the same.

The calipers on the N1K are the same as the non-Brembo calipers on the 15+ CBR1000RR. A great set of monoblocks. I use those CBR Tokiko calipers on my GSXR1000 and my ZX12R.
I may upgrade it to steel lines later but as of now, brakes are fine for what they are designed to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Theres no reason to post guesses when the information is available. You are incorrect on the oil filter. Kawasaki installs those , at the factory. They would never allow the dealer to install the first filter. Is the filter too tight? Of course it is. Do you hear about new Kawasakis leaking oil, or having loose oil filters? I didnt think so. That's what they have to be concerned with....not removal. So, the filters are tight. They also tension the chain, set throttle cables as well as clutch cables. Why? The set up guy will screw this up.

The bike is also shipped with oil in it , for the same reason. Motorcycle set up is usually done by the least skilled guy in the shop. It's a mistake to ask him to do more than assemble a windshield, or put a wheel on, so they dont. Anymore the only things hes going to assemble will be related to packaging size.

Before the bike leaves the factory, its ran on a dyno to make sure it performs within range. They would rather mistakes be found at the factory and not sold to customers. Italy doesnt much worry about that, and it shows.

It's not a secret. In fact, Discovery channel had a 1 hour special , years ago. At 29:00, notice rhe zx6and old z 1000 on a dyno.

Your remarks got me curious and I went around to ask different people across the US and Canada who have direct dealings with or work for dealerships.
It does not seem like it is a consistent practice across North America & across brands.
Looks like there are 3 types of shipping configurations :
  1. shipped completely dry
  2. shipped with all fluids (including some gasoline)
  3. shipped with fluids minus gasoline
Sounds like all brands test their bikes on dyno and they may drain the fluids before shipping for those that ship dry. I cannot find any official statement or documents to prove that Kawasaki ships all of their bikes wet.

Just making a note here.
 
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As RC said, Kawasaki‘s are famous for overtightened oil filters. No idea why they do. I usually use a big channel lock to get them off.

As to being shipped without a filter or oil, I’d be curious what brand. I’m not aware of any shipped without a filter and oil in them. As RC said, I think that literally all production vehicles are at least started before leaving the factory. Why would they then go to the trouble of draining the oil and taking the filter off? They would have to put something on it to keep oil from dribbling for the next few days.
 

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I always wanted to know what tool they use. The stock filter doesn't have scratches, or tool marks, but it's as tight as a lug nut?
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I always wanted to know what tool they use. The stock filter doesn't have scratches, or tool marks, but it's as tight as a lug nut?
Good point. Not scratch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 · (Edited)
As RC said, Kawasaki‘s are famous for overtightened oil filters. No idea why they do. I usually use a big channel lock to get them off.

As to being shipped without a filter or oil, I’d be curious what brand. I’m not aware of any shipped without a filter and oil in them. As RC said, I think that literally all production vehicles are at least started before leaving the factory. Why would they then go to the trouble of draining the oil and taking the filter off? They would have to put something on it to keep oil from dribbling for the next few days.
Some Honda dealers said they come dry.
No written proofs from either camp: either way, it's not important -- the issue I was chasing was the over tightening of the oil filter.
 

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I watched my '14 come out of the crate at Paulson's Kawasaki. It took about 30 minutes for a highschool kid to remove the crate and braces, wash the bike, blow it dry and fill it with gas. I was the first person to touch the starter button. But there was .2 miles on the trip meter even though the odometer read 0. I was chatting with the sales guy while all this was going on so I didn't see every second of prep but I'm 99% certain no oil was added. And yes, the oil filter was tightened to about 90 ft. lbs. I borrowed a cap that fits the oil filter to a 3/8" drive to get it off.

I watched my '98 Honda VFR come out of the crate the same way except the handlebars were folded in and had to be set, the windshield was in a separate bag, they added oil that was included in the pallet and then gas. The kid washed the bike and dried it and pulled on a helmet and took off "to make sure everything is good". I first touched it with 1 mile on the odo. I suppose that's a good thing.
 
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In the old days, they did have to fill them with oil. Once they started sending them out full, that became the normal thing to do. Some empty, and some full was a disaster. The shop had to eat those mistakes.

I think the main reason for this was the manufacturers selling their own oil. How are you supposed to sell "Kawasaki oil", or "Yamalube" when the shop does the initial fill with Valvoline? Or, they fill your Kawasaki with Yamalube?
 

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As a related issue, I ordered online a Honda Oil Filter that comes from Honda as a kit that includes the “cup” that fits over the filter to take them off. It is by far the best tool I’ve ever had for taking off a tight filter. It fits the indents around the outside of the filter perfectly.

Last week I instinctively grabbed one of the other filter cups (sorry, don’t know what else to call it) that I have had laying around and tried to take my filter off. It just kept wanting to slip off the filter as I put enough torque on it to loosen the filter. I put the Honda version on and it screwed right off.

I’ll try to post a picture of them later.
 

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Filter "cup" is a good description. A friend of mine has 3 sizes - "american car", "Japanese bike" and something else . He calls them "oil filter sockets." It definitely beats channel locks or driving a screwdriver through the damn thing.

I'd get one of my own but I'd only use it once per new bike. I'm a finger tight advocate.
 
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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
[...]
I'd get one of my own but I'd only use it once per new bike. I'm a finger tight advocate.
Yup, hand-tightened is about right for 13 ft-lbs (specs in Service Manual).
 
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Filter "cup" is a good description. A friend of mine has 3 sizes - "american car", "Japanese bike" and something else . He calls them "oil filter sockets." It definitely beats channel locks or driving a screwdriver through the damn thing.

I'd get one of my own but I'd only use it once per new bike. I'm a finger tight advocate.
Between all the vehicles I've owned I must have no less than 12 of those damned things.
 
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