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Discussion Starter #1
Recently replaced my fuel filter witch required a partial disassembly of the fuel pump assembly. The fuel filter solved my top end power loss but now I have a fuel gauge that wont read correctly.
In three fill ups since reinstallation it hast read full till ether leaning it over hard in a left hander, hitting a fairly decent bump or major dip. I've thrown it back and forth while sitting still and while rolling neither of witch had an effect.
Once reading full it seems to track fuel consumption like normal, but say at half a tank if you stop and put the bike on the kick stand it will drop down to 1 bar and may or may not rise to 2.
I'm thinking I might have turned the pump assembly a bolt hole but would love your input on things to check before removing it again.

As always I appreciate all comments.
Kenneth
 

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The last pump I worked on had a float system that was about as sophisticated as a toilet. It floated more/less depending on how high the level was. I suspect this is the same?

If it were turned at a different angle, within the tank, it could be binding up , or not rising or falling to the levels it thiins it's supposed to be at. Your idea makes perfect sense. The diagram appears to show the float the front of the tank. Is that how yours is?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah it's a standard resistance based sending unit with a "toilet" float and stubby little arm.
 

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Did you get your filter from Kawasaki, or aftermarket? For a long time, kawasaki never had a replacement filter for their pumps. You had to use aftermarket filters. They were very cheap, aftermarket. I bought 3 of them for 10.00, or maybe less.

Kawasaki did have a filter, but it was for their offroad 4 wheeled machines and it also fit their fuel pumps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was from Babbitts and listed for my bike, came with three O-rings and think it was 60.00 dollars. After getting it in I compared it to the ones listed on line and they look identical. I replaced the orings but could find nothing wrong with the used ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Can the fuel sending unit be replaced?
I've been doing some looking into that and as of yet haven't found just the sender. Babbitts has it as part of the assembly and that is listed for 440.00$ but yes if I could find it and figure out where to get it it can be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm thinking I placed it straight forward, at least I knew it needed to be but at this point I'm second guessing myself.
 
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Can you hold a lit match, or bic lighter over the cap?

No, i have one of those cheap *** pencil cams. Its 10.00 on ebay. It connects to your phone. If the fuel level is low, you might be able to get a look without removing anything.
 

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Doesn’t the movement of the float feed a level control sensor
 

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Mark, that's what it looked like. As the toilet float goes up and down, resistance changes and the gauge shows its level.

But, if that float were clocked to a strange position, like the side, I think it would show full, damn near forever, then fall like a rock when the tank was empty. The one I played with looked like this:


Kawasaki was better at supplying fuel pump parts for its offroad stuff. Lots of the streetbikes just showed one piece pumps for 450.00. Often times the offroad pump uses similar parts, but it's a guess and a hope that they will fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That's a good ideal on the scope, dont know why that didnt come to mind
 

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If the float is clocked wrong and dragging on the tank then you would definately have an erratic reading, I never seen the actual float but the position in the assembly shows the float side ways and really doesn’t look that large or hanging out from the assembly to much. I guess that would make the removal a good candidate for match marking if possible.
 

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Mark, with regards to the clocking, I'm thinking shape of the tank might factor in, too.

Up front, the tank has a slope. The sides, and back dont. Especially near the fuel pump area. The tank looks massive, but most of the tank is the airbox under it.

A square box would be easy to deal with, in regards to liquid level, but this tank has a strange shape.
 

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Did you get your filter from Kawasaki, or aftermarket? For a long time, kawasaki never had a replacement filter for their pumps. You had to use aftermarket filters. They were very cheap, aftermarket. I bought 3 of them for 10.00, or maybe less.

Kawasaki did have a filter, but it was for their off-road 4 wheeled machines and it also fit their fuel pumps.

The Kawasaki part number for the fuel filter kit (filter + 3 o-rings) for a 2019 Z1000SX is 99999-0522. Not cheap but it is OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Dont think I ever updated this.
Cause of the fuel gauge being erratic was a bad ground. No clue why I would have loosened it.... as theres no need too, BUT no other explanation so obviously I did. As for the pump assembly being clocked wrong it cant be done. One set of bolts are spaced differently and wont allow it.
 

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That was an easy enough fix
 

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Thanks for the followup, pics and comments. I'm a little surprised the fuel pump worked since it shares the ground with sensor. Good job and thanks for sharing.
 

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I'm a little surprised the fuel pump worked since it shares the ground with sensor.
Probably because the fuel level display typically does a weighted running average on the level sensor signal, to smooth over the ripples from the fuel level sloshing around. So every time a sampling comes in with a bad reading, it gets registered in the running average array and take a while for it to be purged from the queue. Depending on how often the sensor glitches, another bad sampling could enter the array before the old bad one gets purged, so the display stays erratic.

Fuel pump has momemtum ans so just keep running over momemtary voltage drops. As long as the ground doesn't drop out completely for a long while, the fuel rail pressure stays up and the bike runs okay.
 
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