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Discussion Starter #1
Ok I got a free pdf manual off the net and checked it out and realized I could do this - easily. I don't have a 3 year extended warranty to invalidate and the 1 year runs out in November when I winterize it. The warranty is one summer in Wisconsin - 7 months. Trickiest bit is checking the forks. This is what I did: Got the bike on my ABBA center stand which has the back wheel 2 inches up and the front grounded. Put a piece of carpet on the pillion then 2 john deere tractor weights about 40 lbs each., Then the front wheel can be lifted with one hand - say 30 lb weight. Then I put a padded car jack under the engine near the oil drain and jacked the front wheel up. I would not dream off doing that if the front weighed more than 30lbs or so at this point. Then I swung the steering from lock to lock and checked it was smooth and free and not stiff and not loose. Then I pulled the front wheel forward and back and there was zero play in the steering stem bearings and no clunking. Done !

Now I looked at the brake fluid - the front was down about half an inch from the pads wearing in. Got DOT 4 fluid from Wally for $3 and topped it to the line. Put the fluid in the basement where it will be dry and not frozen in winter. Brake fluid absorbs water so must be kept dry.

I checked the clutch cable free play at the hand lever - one tenth inch of free play gap - couple of turns on the adjuster set that.

Checked all the bolts I could see with a torque wrench (manual has torques). Now all I have to do is changed the oil/filter again -remembering to refill the oil three quarters BEFORE I change the filter in order to prevent an air lock. Using a new aluminum crush washer under the drain bolt of course. Check radiator water (a glance). Check for leaks anywhere - none.

Now all I have to do is those really hard things that only a dealer can do - like seeing if the brake lights /indicators come on and checking the tire pressures and the chain (600 miles - come on). oh and washing it... jeez

I'm so glad I did this - I now know my bike and how to do these checks every month if I want. I know it hasn't been started with an air lock or scratched or lifted inappropriately. People say they take their bikes to the dealer for peace of mind - I did mine myself - for peace of mind !

It says the steering stem needs greasing every 2 years - I will go 3 and then let the dealer grease it - I know my limitations and they stop when the special tools come out.

ok question - I found this so easy because I had a center stand. If I hadn't (like most owners), how would I get the front wheel up and swinging free ? jack it on the exhaust pipes ? arrrghh no way

How ?.. I mean how ? How do the dealers do it ? and HOW do the dealers charge $300 and 2 hours work for a few piddly little checks that anyone could do ?

ps the oil filter job is made a lot easier (made possible - I was struggling) by using the Toyota Camry 3.5 V6 special tool------a "TOY 640" Google it - get one - few dollars - heavy alloy. The filter has to be torqued on - not just hand tight and those tin can caps wont remove remove the old filter. Don't tell me about smashing a screwdriver through the can you brute !

How do YOU get the front up with the forks free to turn ? My ABBA stand is my pride and joy.
 

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The front can be lifted up by using a Pit Bull stand that is designed to go under the steering stem on the triple clamp. It's a bit pricey but there is an option for a "convertible" stand that can be used either under the end of the forks, for a front wheel removal, or under said triple clamp for fork service.


Pit Bull Motorcycle Stands & Accessories: Hybrid Headlift Stand

Pricey? Yes. There are competing brands but Pit-Bull is simply the best.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
The front can be lifted up by using a Pit Bull stand that is designed to go under the steering stem on the triple clamp. It's a bit pricey but there is an option for a "convertible" stand that can be used either under the end of the forks, for a front wheel removal, or under said triple clamp for fork service.


Pit Bull Motorcycle Stands & Accessories: Hybrid Headlift Stand

Pricey? Yes. There are competing brands but Pit-Bull is simply the best.

ah that's how they do it - not much room in there for sure. As my ABBA stand solution lets me easily get the back and front up, and with the forks free, I am glad I didn't buy back and front pit bulls which would have cost more. For someone who already had a pit bull rear, buying a front unit might be an answer, although, per my previous thread, I dont think a N1k 2014 can be safely lifted on spools without a great danger of scratching the bike because of the lack of clearance twixt the muffler and swing arm. I scratched mine. I 'stored' my rear stand and standard spools and mini spools and will never use them

Another thing the owner should do during warranty is occasionally change the dashboard display to show water temperature etc. Mine is set to time clock. That way we can make sure all the hidden functions are working.

The valves are not an item to check on the first service - I will not be doing those anyway because I know my limitations (or inclinations)

The service includes setting the tick-over (idle). That is the little knob on the right - big deal. Its harder to work than my toaster.

I also had a good push/pull at the swing arm bearings while I had the bike up on the ABBA stands and it felt nice and solid and no movemnet. Same with the wheel bearings.

I am working on the theory that if the forks or swing arm were about to fall off, the rider would probably notice something first - that is unless I really am the insensitive beast that my wife claims I am
 

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Serene, I think your wrong...YOU actually checked the small stuff...I'm not 100% a shop would even bother.

The chain on mine was SOO tight, I'd never have made it to the 600 mile check. I showed the service manager after I'd just paid 225.00 for set-up and freight..I said "THIS"..and pointed to the chain..is why you'll never see my bike again.

I wish you were closer, I'd love to have another z1000 or Ninja guy to do a valve check with. I've done them, but have difficulty with the feeler gauges. I think we could figure it out, together.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Serene, I think your wrong...YOU actually checked the small stuff...I'm not 100% a shop would even bother.

The chain on mine was SOO tight, I'd never have made it to the 600 mile check. I showed the service manager after I'd just paid 225.00 for set-up and freight..I said "THIS"..and pointed to the chain..is why you'll never see my bike again.

I wish you were closer, I'd love to have another z1000 or Ninja guy to do a valve check with. I've done them, but have difficulty with the feeler gauges. I think we could figure it out, together.
Well of course the valve check isn't in the 600 service but yes, I think with the correct sealant and the workshop manual, you and me could do it. But there is a lot of junk in the way to be moved, so its best done as part of a big service I reckon. I take your point about the chain and I check mine after every outing. When I used to thrash my 1200 Bandit round western scotland over a long weekend, the chain would sometimes be flopping down alarming and I would limp home 200 miles in the pouring rain. But yes, tight is even worse as it will hurt the chain and sprocket bearings etc

My list is the small stuff but there is no big stuff in the 600 service - nothing. Getting the front up and checking the steering is the hardest bit and that's dead easy once you figure how to lift the front

I just did the 2nd oil change (600 miles) today and the Camry V6 filter removal tool wasn't so good this time, so I used the 3 claw tool - that never fails but can crush the old filter if its on too hard. 13fp is the torque on the filter. Hope nobody bought that Camry tool on my advice as it isn't 100% but worked great on the last filter (original) which was in HARD. The 3 claw never fails but is a bit rough.

I just found and interesting problem - on the left side at the rear middle of the fairing there is a little back plastic plate which is held in by 2 hex screws and is behind the fairing. The plate holds a plug which the fairing presses into. Both screws were loose to point of dropping out and only the fairing was holding them in ! You have to half remove the fairing to get at them. I will use locktite (breakable) when I re-fasten them.

I am going to do this servicing thing as a rolling program, because after all, pilots check over their plane every time before using it. I am not that extreme but certainly once a month I will give it a good inspection.

2nd oil change - still no filter burping required again . Drained the oil, new crush washer, put 7 quarts of Rotella in, then changed out the filter (half filled) - only a little dirty oil came out with the filter, then hand tightened the filter, topped up the oil level to full (carefully), started up with short bursts of the starter, not enough to fire it, and then let it start while watching for an oil light. Then torqued the filter to 13fp

No oil light at any time. I would be devastated if I started it and didn't notice it - even for 10 seconds - so I am very careful about the fill sequence which has to be right on these engines.

Heck what if the dealers started it with an air lock - we would NEVER know for a year or so...and that's why I will do every oil change
 

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Rotella Oil

Allserene,

I read somewhere else that Rotella OIL is used in this motor by owners. The crude oil is described on the bottle - for use in heavy duty applications or diesel motors. Have I described this information correctly?






Regards,

MrSand
 

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Rotella is a very popular oil choice on several other bike forums I belong to. Oil is a very personal choice. All I would recommend is read about it & make your own decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Rotella is a very popular oil choice on several other bike forums I belong to. Oil is a very personal choice. All I would recommend is read about it & make your own decision.
Absolutely - It checks out with all Kawasaki's recommendations, so complies with warranty requirements - and I will be using the regular oil up to 2,000 miles when I will switch to synthetic. I rate Amsoil with BMW and Mercedes and Jaguar - I don't pay for the top brand in the hope of getting something better because it doesn't work like that. I have had two new Mercs and they were crap. I drive a simple 3.5 V6 Camry LE now - 7 years and not even a light bulb blown, while my pal with his Lexus carries a clipboard to note all the complex electrical glitches for the next exorbitant service. The best mix of quality and price is where the sweet spot is and that's why I have the N1K - it's fantastic . 217 miles in 4 hours on bumpy Wisconsin roads and my boney old bottom feels better than after 4 hours sat at the computer ! I think the suspension /tires must be running in as well as the cornering is getting progressively better and is now neutral compared to the over-steer I had at first.
 
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