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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not 100% sure how to word my problem, but here's my attempt.

I was down in SoCal for an event this weekend and put about 1100 miles on the clock. I'm now just shy of 15k on the odometer for my 2016 N1K. Yesterday on my way back, I noticed that the clutch wasn't fully disengaging when I released the lever. I had to bump the lever forward for full disengagement. It made getting up and going, especially on hills or in traffic, a bit nerve-wracking because I was still stuck in the tail end of friction zone unless I bumped the lever forward. Then I noticed when it was time to crack the throttle open and pass folks dawdling on the highway, my RPM would drop 500-1000RPM if I tried to get on the throttle. I'd be going 75mph and would blip it just to get up to 80-82 and then the RPM would drop. Sometimes bumping the lever forward would fix it until the next shift, other times I was SOL and would have to very gently up the speeds. Same issues getting up the speed and shifting from a traffic light.

I've tried adjusting this way and that way and sent a copious dose of lube down the clutch cable, but it still feels like the clutch is hanging up that last 10-20% of the friction zone. Really, I'm just trying to figure out if this is a cable issue or a clutch pack issue.
 

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There is a small, external spring. It isnt very powerful, but it does do the return work.


Bottom, right. Label says 92145-0325. Its 3.00, so figure it to be a pos. It's probably worth ordering 2.

You would have to disconnect the cable to Install a new one. Once you do that, the arm rotates backwards. If you do that, it will lift off. Slide new spring into place and you are good to go.

I would look at the spring, first, and see if its broken.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is a small, external spring. It isnt very powerful, but it does do the return work.


Bottom, right. Label says 92145-0325. Its 3.00, so figure it to be a pos. It's probably worth ordering 2.

You would have to disconnect the cable to Install a new one. Once you do that, the arm rotates backwards. If you do that, it will lift off. Slide new spring into place and you are good to go.

I would look at the spring, first, and see if its broken.
Thanks RC, but the picture I'm assuming you added isn't coming through. What diagram should I check out on bike bandit? Is it at the lever side or the actuator arm on the clutch case?
 

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Ya know, I dont get along well with posting links, sorry.

Look at the clutch diagram, and you'll see the piece rhe cable attaches to in the bottom, right corner. It's the only spring there, in that section.

The spring looks like this. It's usually broken where it touches the case. The square section.
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Try to remove the clutch lever and clean and regrease the bushing and bolt that the lever pivots on. I faced a similar issue from a customer's r3 when he said his clutch was slipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Try to remove the clutch lever and clean and regrease the bushing and bolt that the lever pivots on. I faced a similar issue from a customer's r3 when he said his clutch was slipping.
Good tip. it got dark before I could test ride it, but lubing that pivot made the clutch feel so much better.

RC, good guess on the pivot spring but it was totally fine.
 
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Good deal. It's nice not to have to tear into things. It's probably worth looking at the cable, too.

There really isn't anything holding the clutch apart. If the pivot point has seen better days, the cable probably has, too. The spring force to close this clutch isnt as strong as it was for the early designs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good deal. It's nice not to have to tear into things. It's probably worth looking at the cable, too.

There really isn't anything holding the clutch apart. If the pivot point has seen better days, the cable probably has, too. The spring force to close this clutch isnt as strong as it was for the early designs.
I remember on my old Zephyr I had to take the clutch case off to remove that clutch arm and the spring, same deal on the Ninja? At least I saw in a different tear down video that you don't have to drain the oil as long as the bike is on the kickstand. I just did that oil change god dang it.
 
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This clutch arm is simple and easy to deal with. I don't specifically remember the Zephyr, but on some older bikes, the arm was a real project to remove. You wouldn't even need tools if the cable was loose on this one.
 

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Clutch is out of adjustment, it's to loose. There are two places to adjust you're clutch freeplay, one on the handle perch & the second is on the side of the engine under the fairing. Bike is 6 years old, cables just stretched.
 

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I think he's having the opposite problem. The easy fix would be to lube the lever pivot and make sure the nut on the pivot bolt isn't too tight. It's a little early for a clutch cable but I don't now how corrosive your area is. I replaced my clutch cable at 60,000 miles and it made a big difference on pull effort and action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That lever pivot was so gunked up. I don't even know how. Bike sits covered all the time and I'm not in a particularly dusty or corrosive area. Just one of those things I guess. I got it nice and cleaned, polished the pin, then lubed it up and its like night and day. There's a new clutch cable in the mail that I'll throw on when I do my coolant change and have that right fairing off, but I don't think the cable or even the cable tension was the issue.
 

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Remember in the old days...pre abs, traction control, or pretty tft displays?

Back then there was enough money left over to use covers over the lever pivots and this wasn't so bad.
 

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That lever pivot was so gunked up. I don't even know how. Bike sits covered all the time and I'm not in a particularly dusty or corrosive area. Just one of those things I guess. I got it nice and cleaned, polished the pin, then lubed it up and its like night and day. There's a new clutch cable in the mail that I'll throw on when I do my coolant change and have that right fairing off, but I don't think the cable or even the cable tension was the issue.
If it feels good now, I'd save your new clutch cable for when you have 30,000 miles or more. I'm rough on stuff and my cable was fine until around 45,000 miles. Then I lubed it for a while before replacing it.
 

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The new assist slipper clutch doesn't have stiff springs, at all. In the old days, those clutch springs did help with this return action.

With those springs being soft, there isn't anything to helpwiiith the return other than the small spring I posted a picture of.

With that in mind, the sticky pivot point would be enough to cause problems.
 

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That's right but a slip & assist clutch doesn't need stronger spring pressure, every time you twist the throttle the pressure plate slides down a series of ramps locking the clutch together.

I'm going to say you could take all the springs out of a slip & grip clutch and it still would still fully close. Of course you would have to put the three bolts back in the pressure plate and Everytime you let off the throttle there would be no spring pressure to hold the clutch closed.

OP said he had to push the clutch handle forward so if his clutch is slappibg shut Everytime he gives it fuel the only thing left is the clutch cable.
 

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With what you said about the springs, this is how resistant people are to change, and how vendors like to take advantage of that.

You can see those springs don't do much in this clutch. Like you said under acceleration, they may not do anything . The more power you give it, the harder it closes. A brilliant design. When I installed mine, back in 2016, the light springs made me think they had made a mistake.

This clutch is VERY sensitive to how the cable is adjusted . If you don't allow it to have some play, the clutch is riding on the ramps, trying to open. If this happens, it can't close, and it slips. It doesn't take much slipping to destroy the plates. Even a few slips glazes them and they won't grip properly.

Rather than explain this, Brocks sells a set of 39.00 magic springs that are 10% more stiff.

At most, these would make the lever harder to pull. 10% more clamping power than your 100hp pulling them closed? Ok.....????

 

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No, not that. You've never given me any reason to do that. I hate to have all these options and not tried them, although I've not had one issue with my clutch.

I thought the heavy duty springs were ..interesting? Is that something people would want..? A heavier pull to the clutch lever?

They might make the slipper harder to activate? Should I try them? From what it sounds like, the Bricks springs are stronger than these.
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