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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my Speedymoto 50mm Tall Boy clip-ons the other day, and went to install them last night. The instructions list 8 nm (~6 ft-lb) as the torque spec for the m6 bolts that clamp the clip-on to the fork.
However, I'm finding that I need to torque the bolts at least this tight, even a little more, just to get the clip-on to stop rotating around the fork. Obviously, I don't want the handlebars to rotate or come off the forks, but I also don't want to strip out the bolts. There IS still a gap between the ends of the clamp.
I was wondering if I should put threadlocker (or sleeve retaining compound) between the clamp and the fork, or does the torque spec seem low, or am I missing something else?
 

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The way you are supposed to do this is to have the legs 100% dry, and 100% clean. I think the manual mentions denatured alcohol to clean the tube?

The forks look super strong, and in ways they are. However, they upper portion is made from thin aluminum. It's designed to be strong, but allow flex. It doesnt take much clamping effort to pinch the tube. This is easy to do with the lower triple clamp. People do this all the time with the lower clamp. If it's bad, it can bind the fork. The lower tube will no longer slide if this clamp pinches it too much.

The new clip ons have an anodized finish. That's great for protecting the piece, but it makes a lousy surface to clamp. Its slick as compared to the stock...whatever finish. I think the stock clip on might be raw metal at its clamping spot?. Up where you are at, you have the thin tube, but the cap is in place. Its would be very difficult to overtighten this and cause fork damage.

I would clean the tube with alcohol, and slap it together. The stock spec is 15lb/ft. 6 sounds low, but if it doesnt need more, then it's ok. I wouldnt use anything on the tube. Maybe a small amount on the bolt threads, maybe, but the locker acts as a lubricant during assembly. Especially going into aluminum threads. Keep that in mind and go slow up to the final torque setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The way you are supposed to do this is to have the legs 100% dry, and 100% clean. I think the manual mentions denatured alcohol to clean the tube?

The forks look super strong, and in ways they are. However, they upper portion is made from thin aluminum. It's designed to be strong, but allow flex. It doesnt take much clamping effort to pinch the tube. This is easy to do with the lower triple clamp. People do this all the time with the lower clamp. If it's bad, it can bind the fork. The lower tube will no longer slide if this clamp pinches it too much.

The new clip ons have an anodized finish. That's great for protecting the piece, but it makes a lousy surface to clamp. Its slick as compared to the stock...whatever finish. I think the stock clip on might be raw metal at its clamping spot?. Up where you are at, you have the thin tube, but the cap is in place. Its would be very difficult to overtighten this and cause fork damage.

I would clean the tube with alcohol, and slap it together. The stock spec is 15lb/ft. 6 sounds low, but if it doesnt need more, then it's ok. I wouldnt use anything on the tube. Maybe a small amount on the bolt threads, maybe, but the locker acts as a lubricant during assembly. Especially going into aluminum threads. Keep that in mind and go slow up to the final torque setting.
The stock bar mounts seem to be bare aluminum on the clamping surface.

The slickness of the clip-on finish is what made me wonder if I should scuff it up (just on the clamping surface) or use some sort of thread retaining compound.

I think tonight I'll take it apart again, clean the fork tubes and the inside of the clip-ons (I didn't think to clean them when I first assembled), and put it together with threadlocker on the fasteners (as specified in the instructions).
 

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That sounds reasonable. I had some dirt bike triple clamps that were anodized. They gripped the forks with no issue. I never had them slip using normal torque values.

I thought about scuffing them up, like you are saying, but I never did.

I imagine it's too expensive to anodized and then machine to the correct size?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That sounds reasonable. I had some dirt bike triple clamps that were anodized. They gripped the forks with no issue. I never had them slip using normal torque values.

I thought about scuffing them up, like you are saying, but I never did.

I imagine it's too expensive to anodized and then machine to the correct size?
It seems to make sense to me that you would do all the machining, then anodize. Machining, then anodizing, then going to back to machine sounds less efficient, and I suppose there's also the concern about damaging the finish that you've applied when you go back to machine again (which I'm sure can be avoided, but would take more time).
 
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