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So I have been working with Murph and RC and Murph pointed out that the 2012 carb sync process was different than the 2017.

So here is my question - does anyone know why? The 2012 has the balance process pretty traditional (carbs 1&2 then 3&4 and then left bank and right bank) from most bike sync procedures I am familiar with. The 2017 says to specifically not sync the left and right banks but rather keep the vacuum rates at a specified rate in each carb (Throttle Body Vacuum Standard: 40.7 ±1.3 kPa (305 ±10 mmHg) at idle speed).

I am also hoping to see if anyone here has the 2016 shop manual (this if for my personal knowledge since this is the year bike I have and I do not have that specific year shop manual to investigate as well). If you do have this particular year manual please PM me (I already have the 2012 and 2017 ones).

Thank you all...
 

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The 2017 has the crazy assed, exact traction control. Part of how that works is by controlling the secondairy throttle plates. It wouldnt know what to do with the vacuum unless it was very specific.

. Unless that system knows exactly what the throttle bodies are doing, it's going to throw up the bad throttle body motor error.

Our older systems would not be as sensative to an exact calibration.
 

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Thx RC. That makes total sense...
 

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That was interesting being able to read the different methods. Part of what happened is the 2012 method was confusing. And them bringing up the middle adjustment wasnt well thought out.

They gave numbers, in that method of 260-300-250-280.

I'm not sure my morgan carb tune is numbered like that. I'll have to look at it. You guys have no idea what sort of commitment that takes. The case it is supplied in fits, but barely. It takes skill to get it back in there. If it wasnt such a well built case, I would have tossed it.

Those numbers would be expressed by how high the little sticks are sticking up. If it looked like this, I would have turned them all to about 270. That really doesnt fit well with the 2017 procedure, but I think it will work. I believe they dont want you seeing numbers like this and trying to turn them all to 320, or such.

When I checked my ninja, I left notes. I checked it when the bike was new. My bike had a nasty, flat spot right around the idle area, just like all the 11-13 bikes do. Ivan fixed it with his flash. There was never anything I could do about it.

With that said, if I had to turn my results into similar numbers, i would have had. 270-260-280-270. It was very obvious as to what needed to happen, although there was no specific number.
 

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I think RC may have hit on something here. Adjusting the LH pair of throttle bodies against the RH pair by using the centre screw will affect the Throttle Position Sensor, which on the 2017~19 models in turn may affect the ECU / TC.

I suspect (but don't know for sure) this is why Kawasaki specifically mentions to NOT use the centre screw on the 2017~19 models. Using the Pilot jet screws does not affect the TPS.

I have no idea what this means for the 2020+ models as they are "ride by wire" and only Kawasaki knows what "magic" the ECU is doing.

My Morgan Carbtune 2, which is easy to get out of my tool-box, has a scale that shows centimetres of Mercury (cmHg).

The specification is for 305 ±10 mmHg. On a Morgan Carbtune, that would be 30.5 +/- 1 cmHg. (ie. 10mm = 1 cm)

The numbers 260-300-250-280 refer to mmHg, so they equate to 26-30-25-28 cmHg.

In a video link that RC posted elsewhere, a rider is adjusting the vacuum balance on his Versys 1000 using a Morgan Carbtune, and here is a screen shot from that video.

30425


The rider balances all 4 columns to 28 cmHg, when it should be somewhere between 29.5 & 31.5.

I think it is possible to use the Carbtune 2 to balance the vacuum across all 4 throttle bodies, and achieve the desired spec of 30.5 cmHg by just using the 4 pilot screws as described in the 2017~19 method.
 

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Murph, I think you are right on with this. Also, we are starting with bikes that run pretty well, as is. Based on playing with my sv, if this is off by much, you REALLY know.

I dont remember my exact numbers, or what rpm I used. I had my power comander hooked up and it has a live display. That sounds awesome, but the idle isnt ever steady enough to lock in to one specific rpm. You have to give it take at least 50 rpm as you do this cheak.

This guys Versys was in terrible shape compared to mine, and his was nothing to worry about. I was making adjustments that were @ 1/16 turns. Basically nothing.
 

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I would suspect that as the SV650 is a V-twin, any throttle body in-balance would be more noticeable than an in-line 4.

That said, I tend to agree with you. Fine tuning the throttle body vacuum on a N1K, unless they are really way out of balance, is a bit like honing an already sharp knife. The difference between "before" and "after" is minimal.
 

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<< snip >>
I think it is possible to use the Carbtune 2 to balance the vacuum across all 4 throttle bodies, and achieve the desired spec of 30.5 cmHg by just using the 4 pilot screws as described in the 2017~19 method.
It has just occurred to me that while it is possible to use a Carbtune to balance the throttle body vacuums, I have no idea just how accurate the cmHg scale is.

If the scale is inaccurate, you may well end up with 4 equally balanced throttle bodies but still be outside the required specification of 305 +/- 10 mmHg.

I will send an email to the manufacturer and see if I can get some clarification on the scale accuracy.
 

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Murph, great point. I'm sure you've done this before, right..? Not that a person needs to to get this idea, but..if you were measuring the exact amount of vacuum needed, and looking for a specific, exact number, you have to have an exact rpm. Our built in tach is good enough for an idle adjustment, but it's not good enough to use for this sync process.

I would like to see the shop adjust one. A shop would be able to use the KDS system. That would satisfy the rpm requirement. I dont know what vacuum gauge they use.

My 2012 owners manual has several pages of special tools. It's at the front of the manual. They all have Kawasaki part numbers. They are cost prohibitive, but there is some cool stuff.

Does your service manual have this?
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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I think this morgan tool was a great choice if all we cared about was having them equal. I dont think it's what we want if a specific number is important.

Their instruction manual is here:

 

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Murph, I looked at this one. It appears to also show rpm?



The cost is pretty reasonable. Hopefully they have an Australian distributor.

 

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This one is cool, too....AND the video guy has an accent. This might mean it's possible to buy one, in Australia? The accent is a good, positive sign.

 

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Hi RC, they say that "great minds think alike" and as I have already looked into both the DigiTech & HealTech devices, I guess that saying must be true.

The HealTech device looks to be the better of the two, with more features, but is expensive for a "one bike once a year" adjustment. (Landed here in Oz = $575 in my money).

The DigiTech device looks to be a simpler version of the HealTech, and at a more reasonable price (landed here in Oz = $295 in my money).

Both devices display the RPM, but both count vacuum pulses rather an electronic input.
 

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I remember using my Morgan. Seriously, it's a good tool. It w as perfect for it's time. But, when you start looking close, it's basically made of 4 metal rods that get pulled up when there is a vacuum signal attached to them. Also, the manual says, "The exact measurement isnt important" so many times it makes me doubt its accuracy.
 

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Back in the day when the manual was written, the "exact measurement" was not important, just so long as all 4 columns were equal.

Even today, both DigiTech & Morgan still say that an "exact measurement" is not required. That said, Morgan did advise that their device would be accurate +/- 10mmHg.

I suspect that we may never find out why Kawasaki is now wanting an "exact measurement", or if it is even needed.

I wonder what Ivan the Master Tuner would say ?
 

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I wonder if I could prove the Morgan thing is accurate? I have a vacuum pump and refrigeration gauges.

I dont have an amazing way to measure vacuum. My vacuum gauge is set up 100% for cryogenic tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That would be interesting to know. If the Morgan was accurate in displaying the vacuum strength that would be a good discovery as well for those that may have the tool already.
 
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