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I've seen quite a few of these vids, and many more along its genre on You tube. Saw the full "movie" of 21 Days Under The Sun. I enjoyed watching it, and a lot of these types of Grunge/Hipster style motorcycle movies.

I sort of identify with this fringe element of motorcycling. Not because I try to be, I just kind of fit in to some degree...

I'm kind of a cheapskate here and there, I don't like to spend too much on motorcycle related stuff so I won't be seen riding around in full leathers and a $1k helmet. I prefer to be comfortable and practical without looking like the Aerostitch guy. Some days I can look pretty scruffy although I'm perfectly happy and in my element when I do.

I don't like the idea of riding around in a motorcycle the cost as much as a new car, so I won't be seen on the top of the line Ducati, BMW, or H-D. I prefer to wrench on my bikes myself, and I've been accused of living in my garage. I'm also a borderline lone wolf rider and I don't make many friends while I'm on two wheels.

OTOH, when I'm on the N1k I probably won't fit the Grunge/hipster type because they're supposed to ride old, POS, bikes that require constant tinkering to keep running. I really don't enjoy that aspect of this genre. That and I prefer a full face helmet with heated gear means I'm not worthy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So far, nobody's shown up with an impeccably curated Ninja 1000: rust patina on the tank, slammed suspension, knobbies, bobbed tail with "saddle" crafted from steel deckplate, scrambler exhaust, fairing hand-beaten from old road signs. Irony must permeate this creation. Full marks if the "builder" has a torch and crossed wrenches tattooed on his forearms. Careful management of image is a crucial aspect.

15 minutes of Ninja 1000 Forum fame awaits this artisan. The gauntlet has been thrown.
 

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There is a whole movement out there of folks who take perfectly good bikes and turn them into a Walking Dead prop. One that can be ridden of course. The more patina, flat blacks, and
accessories you can attach, the better. Must have a Chemical/Gas Mask up front. Not a fan of those either. But I do kind of like the spirit of freedom they want to convey, and the casual cadence of the lifestyle. I watch some of those videos of them traveling long distances in the rain and cold, they look pretty miserable as they get wet and freeze their asses off. That's supposed to be part of the fun. No thanks. One can look the part without being miserable. A hot shower every morning would be nice too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rides staged with the intent of being shared on social media are much less genuine, especially the ones trying to convey "suffering" or "perseverance". Though entertaining, it's still acting. Far more difficult rides have taken place, anonymously and unrecorded, throughout history.
 

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I got caught in a torrential downpour once, while riding my Walking Dead appropriate Suzuki DR650 dual sport bike (naked with a small windshield). I was wearing rain gear, except for my "waterproof" Alpinestars boots and gloves.

Water penetrated my boots (bad) and my gloves (to a degree). Water pooled around my crotch and penetrated the rain pants! WTF? I could barely see through my helmet face shield. It was only 15 miles at freeway speeds so not bad. I can't imagine that for hours on end. My boots would have been water logged. For long periods in heavy rain, really need boot covers as well as gloves.

Naked bikes are great in good weather. Cheap riding gear is ok most times. But in bad weather, the combination of both truly is miserable. It's only water but couple that with winter cold and it has the potential for epic misery.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Imagine your first long distance riding is from Idaho Falls to San Francisco in late winter and all you've got for warmth is an old Eddie Bauer down jacket. When the trip begins you have all of 300 miles of riding experience on that shiny new 1980 CB-750F. Five miles out of Idaho Falls a bunch of crap falls out of a pickup bed and a busted wood chair clears my head by inches. Long muddy stretches of I-80 road construction challenge the off-road skills you don't have. Fvcking epic adventure! And don't forget you're Admiral Rickover's property, get hurt and there will be living hell to pay.
 

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Aw hell, as long as we're telling adventures...I had to get my SL-350 from Asbury Park, NJ to St. Joseph, MI on December 8, 1973. The bike odometer said it was 912 miles. It was about 40 degrees when I left NJ and was in the teens by the time I got to Ohio. Got pulled over by an Ohio state trouper because I was tailgating a semi for warmth and my tail light was out. I sat in his very warm car for half an hour and then he escorted me to the next exit that had a service station. Turned out he was a biker and ex-military and more concerned about my health and safety than making the state a couple bucks. It was a broken wire so I set the brake switch to always be on. I'd bought a snowmobile suit for the trip and along the way added newspapers over my body and paper towels over my face. It was a 20 hour trip, 5AM to 1AM the next day.
Since 1989 I'm an Aerostitch nerd, heated jacket (2005), heated grips (1992), good boots & gloves & helmet. I don't leave home without them...
 

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Rikifumi, what the hell took you to IF? I know that area very well. It gets scary cold up there, and the storms can be incredible.

In modern days, the roads that connect their giant windmils are unreal. I trashed my c14 tires on rhem in about 2 days. They are on the east side of town, in the foothills. We should all meet there.
 

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You were out THERE... .

I'm out there, several times per year. Lucky me, our products are at almost every part of what's out there. I had an extremely safety oriented boss who insisted on pictures of every one of our systems. Regarding that place, I did not even ask. I told him that even mentioning a camera will be a problem, and I suspected I would be shot if I had one on any of the sites.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There is not much THERE any more. S1W, A1W, and S5G ("the ketchup bottle") prototypes are all gone and I believe the ECF is all that remains at the former NRF.

Circling back to the patina thing: carbon steel wire brushes were a big no-no inside the prototype, and if they were used it was under strict controls. Well, usually: one of them ended up in our toolbox and the nub (me) used it to clean a stainless steel valve body. Big mistake! Within days the stainless component had broken out in an ugly measles of growing rust spots!

So if anyone here is an aspiring hipster artisan, practice using carbon steel tools on those stainless steel parts. They'll look like crap in no time, and you'll be on your way to patina legend status.
 

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They must still have something out there that's worth protecting? Security is still insane. Maybe even more than it was? I always wonder, but it's just not appropriate to ask questions.

"Stainless" is awful to work with, anymore. It's often time from China, and god only knows what it really is.
 
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