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Discussion Starter #1
So, did you ever wonder if these were any good?

The battery tender jr. I bought this one for my concurs 14. I let its battery go flat, once, then learned.

Bike appeared to have the original battery. I bought it , used, in march of 2010. That means the battery could be as old as the end of 2007.

Sadly, it needs to be replaced. I have slow start and 12.4 volts.

The pos, stock battery only lasted 9 years.It was connected to this tender any time it was not being ridden.
 

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In my view ,yes. Interestingly RC a personal friend of mine has done over 300k kms now with his Concours, mostly on FarRides and some Iron Butt Rides, Still all original except for full fork rebuild.I did 65k kms on mine without a single hiccup..A remarkable bike.
 

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I looked at a few battery recharger/maintainer reviews when I first purchased my N1K. I remember more than one review stating that all the claims of bringing a dead battery back to life and "desulphating" were marginal at best.

They basically said, get a basic battery maintainer that keeps your battery charged, and just keep it charged. Don't spend the extra money on a fancy one. None of the fancy tenders in the tests successfully brought dead batteries back to life.

So I purchased the 0.75 amp Battery Tender Junior, and always plug it in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
9 years makes me very happy, for battery life. Especially when its not my primary bike. That battery tender jr has been attached to that battery for several years, no joke.

Seriously, I could probably finish out the year on this 12.4 v battery, but I hate having issues, or problems. This is my warning, as it were.

I wont do a Shorai for this one. Probably replace it with what it has, already.
 

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Dang RC if you only got 9 yrs out of it id sell the whole bike and get something that would last lol
 

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I'm torn on always keeping a bike permanently on a charger........if the battery does go bad, you won't know until you get about an hour away from home..........
 

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I'm torn on always keeping a bike permanently on a charger........if the battery does go bad, you won't know until you get about an hour away from home..........
I use one of these every week or so, just to get an idea of the battery health.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DJ5KE9A/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I leave the bike overnight without charging and take a look at the voltage the next day. It's usually right around 13.0 volts. Not a perfect method, but hopefully it will show some lower voltage before the battery completely dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm torn on always keeping a bike permanently on a charger........if the battery does go bad, you won't know until you get about an hour away from home..........
Great point, and the battery in question has not failed....but, it drops to 12.3v after it is disconnected.

It never dropped that low before.. I am doing this to avoid what you are talking about as I'm sure that's next.

Would never have noticed it except for the built in volt meter.
 

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Speaking of Battery Tenders (BT,) I know it's a simple task to attach the BT cable directly to the battery, but I was hoping to "pickup a hot" somewhere near the dash. Anyone know if there's an unswitched 12VDC connection up front?

And this is for 2015 N1K...

Thanks in advance. :)
 

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I looked at a few battery recharger/maintainer reviews when I first purchased my N1K. I remember more than one review stating that all the claims of bringing a dead battery back to life and "desulphating" were marginal at best.

They basically said, get a basic battery maintainer that keeps your battery charged, and just keep it charged. Don't spend the extra money on a fancy one. None of the fancy tenders in the tests successfully brought dead batteries back to life.

So I purchased the 0.75 amp Battery Tender Junior, and always plug it in.
Well, with batteries, it's always a roll of the dice. It depends on how far gone it is. I've got a Tecmate Optimate 4, and it's saved two batteries so far, however, those batteries were only deep-discharged once each. I still consider it luck. Once a battery is flat, I assume it's done for until proven otherwise.

Personally, I prefer smart chargers. Now a days, they're no longer $200+ items. I'm a bit of a nerd when it comes to batteries though, probably comes from being into R/C vehicles for so long, lol. Anyways, I'd rather have a charger that checks the status of the battery, and will only charge, or float charge, if necessary. It doesn't take much to keep a battery in good shape while it's stationary. It also gives me peace of mind leaving it plugged in all the time. Mind you, I see nothing wrong with the small battery tenders like you got.

**** RC, 9 years is impressive. Every once in a while, you can end up buying a battery that just ends up being better than average in build quality. Best I've gotten out of a moto battery is 7 years. Typically, if they make it 4, I'm happy. I've been very lucky in that all the batteries in my motos have died while still in the driveway, LOL.

A little battery buying tip for everyone. If you're getting a standard lead-acid replacement, get the Yuasa battery that comes with the acid pack. You then add the acid yourself, charge it up, and then install it in the bike. The acid comes in a tube pack, that you simply press into the top of the battery, and it drains all on it's own. It's more time consuming, however, you're now 100% certain that the battery is as fresh as possible, as opposed to one that's been sitting on the shelf for ages, in an unknown charge state.
 

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A little battery buying tip for everyone. If you're getting a standard lead-acid replacement, get the Yuasa battery that comes with the acid pack. You then add the acid yourself, charge it up, and then install it in the bike. The acid comes in a tube pack, that you simply press into the top of the battery, and it drains all on it's own. It's more time consuming, however, you're now 100% certain that the battery is as fresh as possible, as opposed to one that's been sitting on the shelf for ages, in an unknown charge state.

Totally agree. Not only does this eliminate the question of how long it may have been on the shelf somewhere, you also know how it's initial charge was done (very important).
 
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