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2022 Versys 650, (Past 2021 N1K SX SE, 2022 Z900RS, )
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I've always believed the bike suspension Maker in their Factory tested and set the forks settings and rear spring compression and rebound (if fitted) to the OEM Brand's supplied settings.
This process as Quality Assurance to the OEM, and saving the OEM from rejecting them if they did it. As in having the fork calibrated after being set to the handbook static value as a start place.

Say the fork rebound was quoted as 1 turn back from fully screwed in; the Operator would twiddle the screw head to give the exact and prefect amount of rebound as the OEM wanted.
Perhaps on a MotoGP crew this would happen via the Ohlins truck Man, but what about our cheap and cheaper bikes ?

When I get a new bike (that fairly often), before I twiddle with the clickers, I very lightly centre punch align marks on what's adjustable so I know where I started from.
I've been of late, doing this on the Versys 650. What I found was the rear remote preload adjuster was spot on, but the fork preload and rebound were quite a bit away from the Handbook.
The rebound is very sensitive to turning it's screw, so I've been balancing it out with more front preload.

When I used the Handbook settings, it was a vast improvement in that it was consistent between front and back over bumps and in cornering.
Very neutral was the ride. Not race bike sharp or sloppy slow or harsh over big bumps.
This is not the first bike I noted this on, but I'll forget the centre punch marks from now on as it will just confuse future Owners.

I now wonder if anyone else was a gullible as me in believing it was correct out of the box (and I don't expect the PD service to check it today) ?

Rob.
 

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When you assemble cartridge forks....specifically the way you install fork caps, you have 3 or 4 steps you have to follow.

Depending on your accuracy, you might end up with a few more clicks or turns, or less than the factory says you will.

Not a big deal as the overall range will be similar and you don't often times find a stock bike that would be adjusted to the extreme ends of it's range. The stock adjustments don't do much until it reaches its extremes, so the good enough works well enough.

When Showa assembles these forks for Kawasaki, they are not able to spend the time on assembly that we can in the garage. If you change fork oil, you'll also see what you dump out isn't the same as what you buy to put back in.

Just like you are saying, I seriously doubt they pay their assembly crew to count 14 clicks on each new fork, or shock.

The shocks are worse. Most stock shocks still have air in them. It takes 30 minutes to properly bleed a shock.....that's not going to happen.

They will get it close and send it out the door.

When you set up bikes, they do the minimum amount required to make it rideable or getting it on the showroom floor. Usually that's installing the handlebars. Maybe attaching a front wheel. Install the battery. Small stuff.

Shops charge like this is some giant, supercharged check and verify process, but like you noticed, there's no way I would reset the suspension. Especially when most bikes are easy to adjust. This means I might set it up, perfectly by the book and a would be customer sits on the bike and changes it.
 

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Out of about 50 bikes over the years I have only purchased 3 new ones. All three, the settings were close, but not OEM specs. New or used, it's the first thing I do with any bike is set the suspension to OEM specs and go from there.
 
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