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Discussion Starter #1
...but how about dragging the toes of their boots in the twisties?????:devil:
A guy on a super-hot 200+mph GSXR 1000 was right with me and he said my side bags were about six inches off the ground! It was SO COOL!!!!!! I don't need to do that again!!!!!!!:grin:
 

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Hey Bazz, I thought that stuff was for the track?????

LOL you know I like it though.
 

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Yea bazz what kind of example are you trying to set, lol thats some cool stuff, but keep the paint on the side bags
 

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Its always amazed me how twisted this sort of thinking has become. As if dragging things equals speed.

There's a big difference when a moto go rider drags his elbow, on Moto gp tires, than when one of us does around a war mart parking lot.

One rider really needs the lean angle to deal with his speed, the other would get passed by a fast rider since he's just he'll bent on dragging things, and using up his tire.

There is also a brain and comment sessempart to this. One rider is on a priceless custom tire that will be 100% worn out, in 82 miles. The other is on tries we buy at our local stores.

If a person needed proof, watch some of the Isle Of Man racing. Those guys are the world's fastest street riders and use as little lean angle as possible.

It's become much like guys who can wheelie a 1/4 mile. A great stunt, but a measure of nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Its always amazed me how twisted this sort of thinking has become. As if dragging things equals speed.

There's a big difference when a moto go rider drags his elbow, on Moto gp tires, than when one of us does around a war mart parking lot.

One rider really needs the lean angle to deal with his speed, the other would get passed by a fast rider since he's just he'll bent on dragging things, and using up his tire.

There is also a brain and comment sessempart to this. One rider is on a priceless custom tire that will be 100% worn out, in 82 miles. The other is on tries we buy at our local stores.

If a person needed proof, watch some of the Isle Of Man racing. Those guys are the world's fastest street riders and use as little lean angle as possible.

It's become much like guys who can wheelie a 1/4 mile. A great stunt, but a measure of nothing.

Fair enough. IIRC, it was a 25mph, maybe 30mph, posted twisty section. But I wasn't going track speed. Nowhere near it. But fast enough that I had to lean my body (not my bike) far enough to make the curves, that I dragged my boots. I didn't drag any bike parts. I see it as a milestone that my skill set has improved so much that I can do that safely (not that I want to make a habit of it), as well as a testament to how great the N1K handles on a set of Q3+s. As a matter of fact, the other guy that was riding with us had a brand new Triumph sport bike and he said that as soon as the stock tires are shot, he's getting Q3+'s.
 

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I’d say your foot positioning on the pegs is wrong. And dangerous. You can easily have a bone-crunching recoil if you’re dragging your toes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I’d say your foot positioning on the pegs is wrong. And dangerous. You can easily have a bone-crunching recoil if you’re dragging your toes.


Good point, thanks. I'll pay closer attention to that. I'm pretty sure I had the balls of my feet on the pegs, but the toe of my boot hangs over the front (even with my midget feet). But the pegs mounts are jointed to help mitigate that, too, right? I dragged a peg on my NT700V once (but not my boot) and it moved as designed. That was before I learned the whole body lean thing. I hit a corner I took almost daily near my old house harder than usual. Got my attention, that's for sure!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There is also a brain and comment sessempart to this. One rider is on a priceless custom tire that will be 100% worn out, in 82 miles. The other is on tries we buy at our local stores.

If a person needed proof, watch some of the Isle Of Man racing. Those guys are the world's fastest street riders and use as little lean angle as possible.

It's become much like guys who can wheelie a 1/4 mile. A great stunt, but a measure of nothing.

In the same vein, we praise bicycle racers for the amazing things they do in a racing environment on bicycles that weigh ounces. I suppose it's tooting my own horn, but I always thought it was a greater feat to tow my toddler in a kid trailer full of toys, diaper bag, etc behind a 45-pound recumbent trike for 40 miles in and around a city.


Yes, we can certainly apply some racing techniques (perhaps modified, i.e. leaning in hard but not dragging knees and elbows) to the street. But I think the fact that we can hone our skills to do amazing things on the street within safe and (reasonably compliant) legal limits in our daily riding is pretty cool. Yeah, I wanna do a track day to learn stuff and see how fast I can push the silly thing, but I think conquering the real world is of more value.
 

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See Baz, that bug... when it bites is a sure enough make you want more of it one isn't it?
 

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I broke my ankle many years ago. Since then I do not have the range of motion like my other foot. When I was a roadracer I constantly dragged my toe because I couldn't get it up and out of the way. I would see picks of me with my toe smoking at full lean! I also would go through a couple pair of expensive boots a season. For me it was like a curb feeler, the first thing to touch down. And yes, it can lead to you jamming your foot pretty good. Try putting it in more towards the frame in turn and then back out after. You'll save money on boots.
 

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Good point, thanks. I'll pay closer attention to that. I'm pretty sure I had the balls of my feet on the pegs, but the toe of my boot hangs over the front (even with my midget feet). But the pegs mounts are jointed to help mitigate that, too, right? I dragged a peg on my NT700V once (but not my boot) and it moved as designed. That was before I learned the whole body lean thing. I hit a corner I took almost daily near my old house harder than usual. Got my attention, that's for sure!!
When entering a turn, swivel the front half of your foot on the peg such that it hugs the engine casing. You are good to lean now. The peg mount moves the peg upward if you ground the peg feeler, not if you ground your toe.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When entering a turn, swivel the front half of your foot on the peg such that it hugs the engine casing. You are good to lean now. The peg mount moves the peg upward if you ground the peg feeler, not if you ground your toe.

Thanks for the advice! I tried moving my foot/toes back further today, but it didn't feel....natural, I guess. I did do a better job of keeping my right knee in on left curves (maybe cuz I could reach the throttle easier), but I couldn't shift as fast because I couldn't reach the shifter easily. I tried looking down briefly in the straight to see where my feet sat exactly, but I couldn't see beyond my thunder thighs.:surprise:Yet another good reason for a track day so someone who knows what he's doing can evaluate what I'm doing and coach me accordingly.
 

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I'm basically an "idiot" who twists the throttle. I love to go very fast on a straight section of road but will only go about 7/10ths in the curvy stuff. at best..
No peg scraping for me as past spills have shown how much going down can hurt the bike, body and wallet. I do enjoy going at an accelerated rate in a fast sweeper, but not the butt hole compressing turns as if you're riding at 2+ times the speed limit on "The Dragon".
That kind of constant self preservation concentration isn't fun for me, just stressful, and one of the reasons I enjoy riding is do eliminate weekly stress.


Steve
 

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Smitty, don't sell yourself short. You are obviously a streetrider, who still rides...that means you are doing something right.

I just saw something alarming. A high school friend gave up motorcycling (too dangerous) and took up something safe. Mountain biking. A week ago, he crashed and is paralyzed from the neck down. No hope of recovery. The sad part is his mistake, and I saw it in his story, today. He put enough pieces together to tell it. A very smart guy. A lawyer. Military service. In excellent shape....all the good stuff.

No idea about counteersteering, and no idea that we hit objects we focus on.

So, he's downhill at @25mph. He sees a bridge, with a 3 inch gap, down the center. He's safe, anywhere, except for this gap. Sure, maybe he loses the front end, but at worst, that's some scrapes,nor bruises.....maybe even a broken bone...

Nope...When he drives into that gap, he flies over the front end, and you can picture it, from there. He pile drives his head, into the ground, and will never walk again.

How fucking sad that the first time he realizes that his eyes guide his arms, will be from his wheelchair?
 

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Its always amazed me how twisted this sort of thinking has become. As if dragging things equals speed.

There's a big difference when a moto go rider drags his elbow, on Moto gp tires, than when one of us does around a war mart parking lot.

One rider really needs the lean angle to deal with his speed, the other would get passed by a fast rider since he's just he'll bent on dragging things, and using up his tire.

There is also a brain and comment sessempart to this. One rider is on a priceless custom tire that will be 100% worn out, in 82 miles. The other is on tries we buy at our local stores.

If a person needed proof, watch some of the Isle Of Man racing. Those guys are the world's fastest street riders and use as little lean angle as possible.

It's become much like guys who can wheelie a 1/4 mile. A great stunt, but a measure of nothing.
Spot on...there turn in is a lot later than short circuit..completely diff lines..think that’s why a lot off the top road riders are not so good at the circuits..completely diff way off riding...there is a few that have done well at both but not many...been quite a bad year for road racing this year..lost to many😞
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm basically an "idiot" who twists the throttle. I love to go very fast on a straight section of road but will only go about 7/10ths in the curvy stuff. at best..
No peg scraping for me as past spills have shown how much going down can hurt the bike, body and wallet. I do enjoy going at an accelerated rate in a fast sweeper, but not the butt hole compressing turns as if you're riding at 2+ times the speed limit on "The Dragon".
That kind of constant self preservation concentration isn't fun for me, just stressful, and one of the reasons I enjoy riding is do eliminate weekly stress.


Steve

I'm an "idiot" once in awhile, too, don't get me wrong. But doing that makes me worry about preserving my license/job and about just how good my quick stop skills may or may not be. I find great satisfaction in applying the skills I've learned and striving to make the "perfect" curve or corner. Sometimes I glance at the speedo at the exit, but it's more about the proprioceptive feedback (RiderCoach-ese) I get from the bike; you know, when a curve feels just right. I really enjoy the challenge of it.
 

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I’d say your foot positioning on the pegs is wrong. And dangerous. You can easily have a bone-crunching recoil if you’re dragging your toes.
Exactly what I was thinking Bik. Up on the pegs Baz. If your toes are touching your feet asre still under the shifter and that's a no no in a turn.
 

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With a smaller foot, a rider gets by with doing this.


I shattered my right foot, offroad, back when I was a kid. I did not read the forum well enough, and no one really mentioned anything. Also not realizing my feet grew several shoe sizes over that off season, and the biek was still low as can be.



Even more awesome was it was on a cheap bike. A Hodaka , I believe, and its footpegs did not fold. The buried rock hit the tips of my toes and sort-of wrapped my foot around the peg.


I think you guys basically said it, but thats the idea...your pushing the brake, or shifting, needs to be a deliberate movement..not because your foot was already in that position.


Its not even something a person needs to practice. Once the balls of your feet are on the pegs, you feel its "right" and how you have so much more feel over the bike.
 

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Exactly what I was thinking Bik. Up on the pegs Baz. If your toes are touching your feet asre still under the shifter and that's a no no in a turn.
Been awhile, Rock. How you doing? What bike you riding? Fed up with it yet? :smile:
 

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Sometimes having toes and peg feelers touch down often can be a sign of not enough preload and/or compression damping in the rear shock. Not suggesting that this is the case with the person who started this thread. This was certainly the case for me when I got my first N1K and was riding around on the stock suspension with stock settings.
 
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