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Discussion Starter #1
I am talking about 'spirited' riding.
How do they cope?
I don't want to change them if I don't have to.
 

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This depends on what you are going to compare them to, as how spirited and what you have been riding. I've been through 7 sets of S21's and S22's on my other bikes, so these are fine for me. Although I do some straight line WOT runs from time to time, most of my spirited rising is in the twisties and canyons. My other two bikes are ZX14's. I ride them like sport bikes, well as much as you can ride a 500 pound beast like a sport. Lots of sidewall grip and relatively long lasting centers. I also feel secure in the rain. They of course are not track slicks. I would say they are hypersport tires that lean way more on the track side than they do on the sport touring side.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
"I would say they are hypersport tires that lean way more on the track side than they do on the sport touring side."

Thanks. Perfect, that is what I wanted to hear. OKay, they sound good so that's some money saved. Yay.
 

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I'm sure there will be riders who disagree with me, and of course that would be their experience which would be different from mine. I do air down the rear and front tire on my ZX14's. They both call for 42 psi front and rear. When I am running certain road section we have in my area and I'm going to be there for a while getting aggressive with the spirits, I will air down to about 34 psi rear and 36 psi front. So far on the N1KSX I have left the pressure per the book, and spent about 60 miles in the twisties, and that felt pretty normal to me as far as the tire response and grip although I have not pushed it more than 45 degrees lean as yet.
 

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I run mine with even lower pressures. I've gone through six sets of S21s and just put on a set of S22s. I've used them on a variety of bikes from Ninja 1000 to H2 SX to GSXR1000 to ZX10R. I run 32 front 33 rear on all but the H2 SX, which I run at 33 / 34. Great wear for my low pressures. Most all of my miles were in the mountains and I got at least 6000 a set. I'm a flatlander now in Houston, so I'll probably have to rethink pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Blimey, so there is room for a lot lower pressure of these bikes for road riding. I'll play around and see what feels best on my differing rides.
 

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Blimey, so there is room for a lot lower pressure of these bikes for road riding. I'll play around and see what feels best on my differing rides.
With the first set of S21's on the ZX14 I aired down to 28/30 and for the heavier bike that was too little air, and it needed a few more pounds depending on the time of year and the temperature. In this area, during the spring and fall we go from in around 40 degrees in the morning to maybe 80 degrees in the afternoon. In the flat area we ride to get to the twisties or canyons it's open to the sunshine but in the mountains it may be shaded from the early sun angle. I try to adjust tire pressure with the heat and that includes the road surface, ambient temperature and how hard I'm pushing the tires. So I developed a feel on the ZX14's in around that 34/36 setting and will go up or down a few pounds dependenting on the conditions and how I'm riding that day.

Tires will communicate with the rider if we pay attention. They do that with sound and feel once we get some experience on the bike and the tire combination. When they are working hard they will change tone, you can hear them even over the exhaust if we listen close. It takes some time to learn them, but yes, there is lots of room to come down from the book pressures. I wouldn't hesitate to try out lower pressure, just approach it little bit at a time on the road stretch you are familiar with.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Great info!! Thanks.
 

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This depends on what you are going to compare them to, as how spirited and what you have been riding. I've been through 7 sets of S21's and S22's on my other bikes, so these are fine for me. Although I do some straight line WOT runs from time to time, most of my spirited rising is in the twisties and canyons. My other two bikes are ZX14's. I ride them like sport bikes, well as much as you can ride a 500 pound beast like a sport. Lots of sidewall grip and relatively long lasting centers. I also feel secure in the rain. They of course are not track slicks. I would say they are hypersport tires that lean way more on the track side than they do on the sport touring side.
Good report eagle six. I just got back from a 3,200 mile road trip with lots of twisties but of course, most of the miles were long and straight. The bike handled very well at good lean angles and turned in quickly. I had full panniers, tail bag and tank bag on board. Towards the end of the trip I noticed head shake when I transitioned and was shocked when I discovered my original tires were squared off!

I too ran a ZX-14 for years and remember dual or even triple compound tiires for that bike. So, in summary, I am going to fit another set of OEM tires but would consider an alternative next time I go for a long sport touring ride.
 

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With the first set of S21's on the ZX14 I aired down to 28/30 and for the heavier bike that was too little air, and it needed a few more pounds depending on the time of year and the temperature. In this area, during the spring and fall we go from in around 40 degrees in the morning to maybe 80 degrees in the afternoon. In the flat area we ride to get to the twisties or canyons it's open to the sunshine but in the mountains it may be shaded from the early sun angle. I try to adjust tire pressure with the heat and that includes the road surface, ambient temperature and how hard I'm pushing the tires. So I developed a feel on the ZX14's in around that 34/36 setting and will go up or down a few pounds dependenting on the conditions and how I'm riding that day.

Tires will communicate with the rider if we pay attention. They do that with sound and feel once we get some experience on the bike and the tire combination. When they are working hard they will change tone, you can hear them even over the exhaust if we listen close. It takes some time to learn them, but yes, there is lots of room to come down from the book pressures. I wouldn't hesitate to try out lower pressure, just approach it little bit at a time on the road stretch you are familiar with.
Dave Moss (suspension guru) has posted videos on this subject. OEM rite pressures are only a guideline and should vary depending on your suspension set up and riding style. Go with what feels right.
 

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Have to.... I'd say no as people have reported dragging their pegs.
 
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