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Doesn't OEM stand for Organically Engineered Material? :grin:
According to a guy with dark glasses and trench coat at a dim-lit street corner trying to sell me some strange blue colored pills... it stands for Orgasm Enhancing Material.
 
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I would enjoy talking to a Kawasaki engineer or designer and discussing what happened to the rear brake systems of their modern motorcycles.

Saving money makes sense, but that's not all that happened. Somewhere along the way, the actual master cylinder size/caliper bore ratios were changed to a setting where they wont and cant work properly. The front isnt like that and it matches the correct numbers.
 

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Having said that, the brakes on the H2 SX SE are significantly better than the Ninja 1000 even though they look similar. One difference is obvious, braided lines everywhere. They use the same front calipers. The front master cylinder is a different part number, and I'm guessing little bigger. The rear brake works fine once you ditch that damn heavy spring. The front rotors are also much larger at 320mm.
 

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Chrispy, yes......thats what I meant.

57x, does the h2sx use a 2 piston caliper? 34mm pistons?
 

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Our ninja uses a 14mm rear master cylinder and a (1) 38mm rear caliper, single piston. Ducati uses a 13mm master cylinder and a caliper with 2 34mm pistons....some of the newer ones are 2 32mm pistons. If you look at high end Brembo rear master cylinders, they are sized 13mm, and thats about it....similar to the 1/2" Kawasaki used prior to 2011.

This chart says "VINTAGE" and "FRONT". I thought it would be 1970 useless when I tried to build a master/caliper combo that worked. It turns out, its not, its still totally accurate. Then again, people in the 70's didn't hoard toilet paper...we just worried about the Russians blowing the **** out of us..

If you do the math on those combinations, it ends up where the ninja is 7.37. The Ducati is closer to 12.1 area.....

The chart says, "Single piston calipers are much happier in the 14:1 to 12:1 range" I know he's talking about front brakes, but its so similar its not even funny. I thin it worked because the brake pedal is sized like a brake lever, if you use your imagination. Its not 4 inches longer, or shorter....

I was able to get mine to be @ 12.2, and its awesome. I had more overall power at 13.0, but the pedal was softer.

These numbers are not 100% accurate. The Ninja numbers are, but I rounded off my final numbers.

Most al of the bikes from Japan are sized like this. BMW follows the chart, on their expensive bikes as does Ducati. I totally understand an effort to protect riders from locking up the brake, but when they dialed out the feel, who the **** knows when its going to lock? Then they spend high dollars on an abs system? Based on all i've been able to find, thats why it doesnt work well, no matter what pads you buy, and also why a super sticky, hard grabbing pad sucks.

https://www.vintagebrake.com/mastercylinder.htm
 
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57x, does the h2sx use a 2 piston caliper? 34mm pistons?
2 - 26mm pistons. If I remember correctly it is the rear caliper from the KLR.

I swapped on the H2 rear hub and now have a Brembo 2-34mm opposed pistons like the Ducati's with the bigger H2 Nissin rear master cylinder. The ABS hasn't minded the change.

The H2 rear rotor is almost 2lbs lighter than the H2 SX rotor. Same diameter, just lots of lightening holes inside the pad surface area. The rear brakes were actually decent with the small caliper and master, but fade was horrible even with the CL pads. I blame the massive rotor doing heat soak.
 

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You should think about how your car is used, what kind of car it is, and, of course, your financial situation. Are you using it to travel every day, or does it spend a lot of time on racetracks? The majority of us use our cars mostly for daily commutes. Ceramic and organic compound brake pads would be best in this situation because they typically don't require warm-ups. Which is why I prefer using those. I would love to hear your thoughts about other brake pads since I'm planning to change mine and will try to use other brake pads! :)
 

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I've found the ceramic and organic pads don't have much power and gave a soft, spongy lever.

You made a good point about pads needing heat to work properly. I've used full on race pads for street work. On a winter day, count on them to never stay warm enough to stay at 100% power.

This Vesrah pad I've recommended to people needed a small amount of heat to be 100%, but even the first cold stop would still be decent.
 

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Sintered pads is where it's at. Yeah, you might need to get your rotors turned sooner, but it's worth it. Organic pads are **** for performance. I fitted the Wagner Severeduty pads to my dually truck, and man it stops a helleva lot better. Same thing with the bike and Vesrah pads. Stops a lot better. Original pads for the Ninja lasted 24k ish miles. That's a lot. The truck? About 96k miles. Longevity is nice, but better performance is betterer I think.
 

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Galfer makes an organic pad. It's performance is better than our stock ninja brakes...not hard to do ...but it will polish the rotor to a point where it looks chrome plated.

People will walk up to the bike and ask how you did that. Not a bad choice for someone who doesn't care about having an awesome rear brake. The look is almost worth it.
 
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