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Has anyone checked out this bike? I like the concept of this bike and I believe if it catches on the Japanese Motorcycle Companies will have their own offerings. The bike weighs 403 pounds...The parallel-twin makes nearly 100 bhp (99 bhp) at 10,500 rpm and 67 Nm of peak torque at 8,500 rpm.

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The bike certainly looks like it would be fun to drive. However, I'm not a big fan of the price. I can buy a slightly used R1 or a RSV4/other litre bike for the same price, and the new ZX6R and GSXR750 are about the same price. If the price was 8-9k I would consider it. If they didn't put all the electronics and stupid emissions stuff the price would be better.
 

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I love the concept of this bike. Love the looks. Appreciate the fact that they made it a "real world" sport bike where it is comfortable to ride. But we need to put this bike into perspective.

Look at the specs of the Honda CBR600rr. 410 lbs. wet. 100 rwhp (not crank). The Aprilia will put out 85 at the rear wheel. I had a 2015 CBR600rr and I can say on paper alone it blows away the Aprilia. It will leave the 660 behind easily especially at the top end. The CBR's handling is sublime. It has top notch components...fully adjustable BPS front forks and rear shock. The motor is smooth as silk and has surprising mid-range punch, along with perfect fueling. If the rider picks the right gear, the engine never feels like it's napping. Yet when the revs climb above 9k RPM it most definitely screams to 15k and will get you to 140 mph really quickly. Then it has the reliability of an anvil.

This is just one example where the 660 falls short. The Yamaha R6 will easily do the same. So will the GSXR600. And when Aprilia starts citing the 660 has superior mid-range, well there's the Suzuki GSXR750, a bike that will outrun a Ninja 1000 with a healthy midrange too.

Sorry Aprilia but Japan, Inc. is way ahead of this game. Price wise, the Aprilia is right up there with the Japanese super sport 600's. The 660 is actually much closer to the Honda CBR650r in specifications. About 80 rwhp, "real world" sportbike configuration. It is heavier for sure. But the price is thousands less than the Aprilia. Most shoppers in this segment is going to look at the Aprilia and be impressed, until they look at offerings from Japan, Inc. Then the question arises: do I give up 15-20 rwhp to get the Italian beauty with lots of bells and whistles? Or do I go for the street cred of the Yamaha R6 that looks just as bad *** and is a whole lot faster? 15 rwhp is A LOT in this category.
 

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The 660 will have low end torque that you wouldnt have with the modern inline 4, and is more like a serious, high quality ninja 650.

I think we will have to wait for someone else to build it. Aprilia cannot manage reliability on its $ 20,000 motorcycles that have been in production for 10 yrs I cant imagine them doing reliable on a budget.
 

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I thought I might be able to argue for this Aprilia, then I saw this:

Finally, it has a decent frame. For the money saved, (@2500) vs the Aprilia, you could upgrade the suspension, exhaust , and flash it.
 

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Yes so it would be interesting to see the comparison of the 660 to the Ninja 650 considering the massive price difference. For sure the Aprilia will smoke the N650 simply because it would have at least 15 rwhp on top more and is lighter. But that's the same advantage that a CBR600rr or Yamaha R6 would have over the 660.

RC, this market segment is quite a bit different from the Ninja 1000. These are younger folks. It's harder to explain to beginning riders or younger riders the advantage of a wide torque curve. Most of them will look at the specs and read the reviews and all they're going to remember is how the Japanese 600 supersports smoked the 660 in the 1/4 mile and top speed.
 

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I thought I might be able to argue for this Aprilia, then I saw this:

Finally, it has a decent frame. For the money saved, (@2500) vs the Aprilia, you could upgrade the suspension, exhaust , and flash it.
Kudos to Aprilia for releasing the 660 though. Great concept. It's biggest problem is price. It needs to be priced at $8k-$9k. Even then it's still a hard sell. Honda's CBR650R isn't flying out of the showroom floor either. The presence of the MT-09 or Z900 doesn't help their cases either. Just at $9k and so much faster and they're naked (hot market).
 

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This bike looks interesting:

...although I feel that it is not pragmatic to adopt electric motorcycles at this stage in the game. Maybe in a decade, if the charging infrastructure is there and they can improve the range, with being competitive on performance with gas.

If I'm getting an Ape I'm getting an RSV4.
 

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Ocl, you know if someone was on the Aprilia, you would have to be on your DR650 in order to tow them back home. I think the dr has a nice tow hook?

I looked at Cycle Worlds last issue...,their real "last" issue, and the Aprilia is on its cover. Claimed "dry" weight is 372.

Aprilia and dry weight is similar to Ducatis dry weight. Either it's a lie, or it doesnt include "consumables " like tires, or battery, coolant, or oil. Their rsv4 "dry" weight is supposed to be 397lbs. In real life, the ready to rode weight is closer to 465, and that's being VERY kind. If the formula holds true, this bike wont be anywhere near 372, ready to ride. A ninja 650 weighs 425. This will likley be closer to that if you fill its gas tank, and add tires.

It also said the suspension had preload and rebound adjustments...no compression. Not a huge deal? Maybe it is at that price and the fact that Aprilia uses 145lb test riders?
 

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Has anyone checked out this bike? I like the concept of this bike and I believe if it catches on the Japanese Motorcycle Companies will have their own offerings. The bike weighs 403 pounds...The parallel-twin makes nearly 100 bhp (99 bhp) at 10,500 rpm and 67 Nm of peak torque at 8,500 rpm.
Yup. Big discussions of this bike going on in racing chat groups. It's going to uproot the lightweight division where the SV650 and the FZ/MT-07 rule. If any of you guys follow MotoAmerica lightweight class, what you see is half of the field has already converted to this bike for next year. And that will be the winning half...

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It's legal at club racing levels too like CCS and racers are drooling all over this because it's CHEAPER than a SV650 or FZ/MT-07. That's right, it's set up so well, all you need is race tires and a race fairing. Buy a SV650 and you need to dump another $6K into it just to be competitive. And that SV still isn't going to be able to compete with this RS and it's 13.5:1 compression motor and its high end factory suspension.

Kudos to Aprilia for releasing the 660 though. Great concept. It's biggest problem is price. It needs to be priced at $8k-$9k.
This bike is a BARGAIN at the price they are selling it for the component level it includes. I and most of the other target audience Aprilia is shooting for is grateful that Aprilia didn't cheapen it down to to what some bean counter thinks the market needs to meet. If that had happened, it would have been nothing more than another SV650, Ninja 650 or FZ/MT-07. The world doesn't need another budget 650. This bike sets itself apart easily.

The market has been waiting for this bike. A torquey, light, high performance twin for people who are tired of gutless 600 class bikes that don't go fast until you wring their necks, and have useless peaky power curves causing you to be in the wrong gear most of the time. This bike is a breakthrough of fresh thinking that changes everything. Bonus facts: it has available a factory racing exhaust and a racing ECU map that can be loaded by the end user for power that's going to be a lot higher than the highly restricted 100hp at the crank of the street emissions model. Also, the crank is 270 degree firing order so it sounds and feels like a v twin but you get the lightness and compact dimensions of a parallel twin.

So in case you guys don't get my excitement here, I am likely buying this bike. I'll report back if I do. I might have to sell a few bikes first, hahah.
 

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Zaph, I don't mean to be rude but.....I'm sure you've ridden a 600cc super sport. Gutless until you wring their necks out? That's really not accurate at all. I've ridden an R6, which is probably the most peaky bike in this class. It's not gutless below 8k RPM believe me. It's geared low and the 6-speed is very closely spaced. It's rarely spinning below 5k RPM even in normal street riding. The CBR600rr is even better in the midrange in exchange for 5-7 rwhp on top. Hell it always surprised me how I can ride the Honda pretty quickly without even touching 10k RPM. Their hp peaks around 13k RPM. On the highway at 80 mph their engines are sitting at around 7k RPM in top gear so no need to downshift to pass unless you're passing a liter bike or a very fast sports car.

I do know riders who hit the twisties on 600's and they're doing everything they can to keep the revs above 8k RPM. Totally unnecessary! Keep them above 6k RPM is plenty. They will climb the rev range quickly in 2nd or 3rd gear. No need to have a hyper sensitive throttle because the revs are hovering around 10k RPM at every corner entry! If I wanted to have as strong a drive out of corners, I just kept the revs at 8k and opened the throttle early. But I never expected N1k levels of drive out of corner exits either!

I honestly am surprised at your comments. I'd rather have lots of top end power and lots of revs when I'm riding a light super sport bike in anger. The Aprilia 660 will no doubt have lots more midrange but honestly, if that's what I want then I'd just get a GSXR750. Because the Suzuki gives you the midrange AND the top end power in the same bike. Perhaps for a specific club racer class, the Aprilia 660 is superior to SV650's. Agree with all that. But in this market niche, forget it! I'd rather have an R6 or a CBR600rr. Track ready when I want it. Fully adjustable suspension. Fully honed at the track. The CBR600rr was the Moto2 bike for a while if you recall.
 

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Zaph, I think the way you put this into the sv650 class makes sense. At one time, I had a really nice sv. Penske shock, gsxr forks, and any other hop up I could think of.

4 grand doesnt go very far in upgrading an sv. I spent at least 3000, and that assumes my labor was free. The sv engine is really good, but its surrounded by junk....everything. At least my 2003 had an aluminum frame. Even with an unlimited budget, theres no way my sv was anything like the Aprilia, except for reliability. A first year Aprilia is terrifying in that regard.
 

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Zaph, do you remember this thread? This is what it takes to build a competitive Ninja 650, for the Isle of Man TT. Imagine if he could have started with this Aprilia.

 

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I think this is the direction the middleweight class sportbike should go. Very few riders are buying 600cc class machines any more. They have become unaffordable. Kawi tried admirably to lower the entry price point on the ZX6R, but as a class, they are still mostly $10k+. FWIW, the RS660's MSRP is actually quite low by euro sportbike standards. It's practically a bargain compared to the uber rich Daytona 765.

I may be somewhat biased against parallel twins, mostly because they are most often associated with budget bikes. This ape could change that perception. Engineering-wise, there is no reason why an inline2 couldn't be a performance machine. It just hasn't been the norm... until now.
 

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Also, with regards to 600 supersports, there is no reason to buy a new one. The yamaha had some small changes, but the Honda, Kawasaki and Suzuki have not changed for almost 10 years. A good 2011 version of any of those is as good as the 2020 versions.
 

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Zaph, I think the way you put this into the sv650 class makes sense. At one time, I had a really nice sv. Penske shock, gsxr forks, and any other hop up I could think of.

4 grand doesnt go very far in upgrading an sv. I spent at least 3000, and that assumes my labor was free. The sv engine is really good, but its surrounded by junk....everything. At least my 2003 had an aluminum frame. Even with an unlimited budget, theres no way my sv was anything like the Aprilia, except for reliability. A first year Aprilia is terrifying in that regard.
I recently all but stole a gen1 SV. The upgrade list is nuts, and I got it for a couple grand. I couldn't pass it up. Many of my friends, one of which has a crazy modded 06 GSXR750 like mine, and all say once I ride the SV I will sell the GSXR750. I don't believe it. Mine is 146 rwhp and 376lbs. Ohlins, Brembo, Carrozzeria, etc. I don't quite get the inline twin craze. As RC said, they are just a budget entry.

But regardless what that Ape can do, it's too expensive compared to a GSXR750 that does everything better for a similar price.
 

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Also, with regards to 600 supersports, there is no reason to buy a new one. The yamaha had some small changes, but the Honda, Kawasaki and Suzuki have not changed for almost 10 years. A good 2011 version of any of those is as good as the 2020 versions.
This is true for the GSXR's and CBR600rr. Any good condition 2013+ is as good as the new 2020. Although there is an updated 2021 CBR600rr coming. The Yamaha R6 got major updates (emphasis on update not re-design), in 2017 I believe. All new body, updated instruments and suspension and electronics. Kawasaki ZX6R also got a recent update.

Any of these bikes is a better bike than the Aprilia 660 in terms of content and especially performance.
 

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Also, with regards to 600 supersports, there is no reason to buy a new one. The yamaha had some small changes, but the Honda, Kawasaki and Suzuki have not changed for almost 10 years. A good 2011 version of any of those is as good as the 2020 versions.
From a buyer's POV, I agree 100%. Most of my bikes are pre-owned, and I only buy brand new if they are at used bike prices, typically heavily incentivized closeouts and NOS.

However, from a mfr's perspective, a bike has to be marketable as current inventory without big profit-sapping rebates. Otherwise, why bother producing it with next to no margins or, worse, take a big loss. Especially when that mfg capacity can be used to make hot sellers, like retro's and adv's that rake in sizable margins.

If everybody only buy use bikes, pretty soon there will not be a used one for savvy bargain hunters to scoop up. A classic example is the Daytona675. Even just a year or so ago, you can still find brand new leftover stock sitting unsold on dealer showroom floor, even though Triumph stopped production in 2016, with enough of a glut they labeled some as '17s. As a result, used Daytona's have become hot commodities and supplies on the secondary market are dwindling. Triumph chose to produce the limited edition Daytona 765R in just enough homologation runs to satisfy Moto2 rules. Apparently, it's far more profitable to sell race bikes and spec engines. The rest of us... screwed.

If this current trend continues, the 600cc class will disappear sooner or later.
 
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Zaph, I don't mean to be rude but.....I'm sure you've ridden a 600cc super sport. Gutless until you wring their necks out? That's really not accurate at all.
Yeah, I've ridden all of them. Well, "gutless" is a subjective term. In my avatar is a Triumph 675R, my middleweight of choice during my middleweight racing years. I chose it over the R6 because it was the least gutless in the midrange, allowing me more flexibility in gear selection on corner exits, while still having a pretty good top end.

A comment in Ari Henning's first ride review sums the RS660 up pretty well: "a welcome respite for those suffering from 600cc PTSD." This sums it up even better:
If I may step onto my soap box for a moment and speak to those who still measure a machine’s worth solely by its maximum output, please know that while (insert any 600 cc supersport here) may make marginally more power, it’s not until the engine has been given time to spin up to 13,000 rpm. Meanwhile, the RS 660 (and all the other lightweight twins and middleweight nakeds out there, for that matter) is tuned for a broader spread of power so it’s much easier to keep in the sweet spot, which ultimately makes for a much more enjoyable, practical, and even faster riding experience.
The RS 660 is a major direction change, not just for Aprilia, but for all of motorcycling. Engine size, price, and technology have ballooned as a trio, but now we’re seeing top-tier tech applied to a displacement category — and at a price point — that actually makes sense.



A first year Aprilia is terrifying in that regard.
That is a little scary. And for me the nearest Aprilia dealer is a 7 hour drive, ouch. I might have to wait for the first few early adopters to report back if their bikes grenade themselves.[/QUOTE]
 
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