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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I decided to start a new thread about the 2020 pulling to the right even though I talked about it in the exhaust thread. I'm sure many riders are going to experience this and having a separate thread will make it easier to research.

First the basics. Within days of taking delivery I discovered that if you take your hands off the handlebars, the bike will pull to the right pretty hard. It does it every time, regardless of crown in the road or wind. To anyone who says "don't take your hands off the bars", my reply is that if there is something wrong you will likely chew through front tires. I know because I had two BMW 1600s that did it. It was a very well known and common issue on that bike. And yes, I got poor and uneven front tire wear.

I took the 1000SX back to the dealer where they very promptly loosened everything on the front end and tried to let everything settle. I took it out and it still pulled exactly the same. At that point I told them I was going to be riding the next day with my riding friend who just took delivery of a 2020 also. I would let them know what his bike did.

The next day we rode, and his pulled at least as badly as mine did. After I got back on my bike it suddenly struck me that Kawasaki had made one change that could very well be the problem. They went from dual exhaust cans to a much bigger can just on the right side.

As promised in the other thread, I took the can off and rode the bike about eight miles today on a road that the traffic moves about 60-65mph and there are stretches of road a couple miles long with no traffics lights.

Even though I have driven that road probably 1000 times, I don't very often any more and had forgotten how much crown it has. But I immediately knew the problem was greatly diminished. I found a few stretches where the crown was minimal, and I also rode both directions. At some points I did not feel any pull at all. And even when I did I could keep it straight with just a little body English. I could not do that at all with the pipe on.

It will be interesting to see what happens when my friend and I put lighter, aftermarket cans on it, which we will as soon as they are available.

I should mention that the bike sounded really good with no can on at all, and was not obnoxiously loud. It sounded no louder than the full Akra system I had on on my 2011 with the silencers off. I hear louder bikes on nearly a daily basis when I ride, and I don't mean just Harley's.
 

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You know what I find interesting about the "pull to the right". One would assume the three choices are 1.....bike rides straight. 2...bike pulls to left.....or 3...bike pulls to the right.

Its rare to find anyone who says their bike pulls to the left. Wouldnt you think that should occur as often as the pull to the right? Most dont mention either one, but if they do, its probably going to be a "pull to right" situation.

I also know that when Team Yamaha or Team Honda would fit one of the supercross bikes to the rider, a normal modification" was to the footpegs. One peg was often higher than the other because our legs are not usually the same exact length. Especially true after a leg injury. The pegs, at different heights, helped square up the rider to the bike and this avoided strange handling traits.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You know what I find interesting about the "pull to the right". One would assume the three choices are 1.....bike rides straight. 2...bike pulls to left.....or 3...bike pulls to the right.

Its rare to find anyone who says their bike pulls to the left. Wouldnt you think that should occur as often as the pull to the right? Most dont mention either one, but if they do, its probably going to be a "pull to right" situation.

I also know that when Team Yamaha or Team Honda would fit one of the supercross bikes to the rider, a normal modification" was to the footpegs. One peg was often higher than the other because our legs are not usually the same exact length. Especially true after a leg injury. The pegs, at different heights, helped square up the rider to the bike and this avoided strange handling traits.
The BMW 1600 pull was to the left. As of 18 months ago, they never fixed the problem that it had since it came out in 2011. Based upon forum polls, at least half of them did it. Both of mine did.
 

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I didnt know about that one. That is a huge list on that bike. That sounds like a design issue more than a random bike that pulls.

Did you ever see this alignment tool? Not that you should buy one as it's somewhat useless on this bike as you cant really play with the alignment because of the chain adjust system.

You can do a version of this with an old, wooden yardstick just to prove the wheels are in alignment. I had one from years back. My bike checks out, fairly well , with the chain adjusters squared up.

 

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I just know this is going to cause a huge debate, argument and hostility, and it may seem to be counter-intuitive, but aligning the front & rear wheels may not be that important.

For example, the ZRX1200's rear wheel was off-set compared to the front wheel and while the sides of the front & rear tyres were parallel, the "long" centre-lines of the tyres were different.

The trick is to ensure that the rear axle is parallel to the swing arm pivot bolt.
 

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Wouldn't surprise me that our bike in 2020 trim would be weight biased to the right.
 

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I know my 2020 pulls to the right. The rear wheel was slightly out of alignment (both according to the adjustment marks and my straight edge tools). When I fixed that, it still pulled but not quite as much.
 

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It would be sad if this is a design issue...i went to look at a new grey Hayabusa a couple of days ago, noticed the tail piece was totally out of alignment. After my bad experience with my ZX14R i guess i will be really weary before buying another bike
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It would be sad if this is a design issue...i went to look at a new grey Hayabusa a couple of days ago, noticed the tail piece was totally out of alignment. After my bad experience with my ZX14R i guess i will be really weary before buying another bike
Well, they designed a new exhaust that added weight to one side and subtracted from the other. At this point I believe that is the extent of the problem. While I don't like it, I'm comfotable that it is not an alignment isssue.

My only complaint now would be if there is a tire wear issue. My bike has over 2,000 miles on it and no signs of a wear issue yet.
 

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Murph, I think you might be right. If the left-right pull was that easy to solve, or if the cause was that simple, people would align their wheels and enjoy the bike that now tracks straight. That doesnt really happen.

I could see the exhaust as being the cause. It is much heavier than you would have with an aftermarket 4-1. I wonder if the zh2 pulls? Its single exhaust is huge. It should have the issue, too?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Murph, I think you might be right. If the left-right pull was that easy to solve, or if the cause was that simple, people would align their wheels and enjoy the bike that now tracks straight. That doesnt really happen.

I could see the exhaust as being the cause. It is much heavier than you would have with an aftermarket 4-1. I wonder if the zh2 pulls? Its single exhaust is huge. It should have the issue, too?
One would think that a bike like the Z H2, which is an all new model, would have been designed for the single exhaust. On the N1K did someone forget, or they just figured we would not notice?😳
 

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So, if you have a 2020 that pulls to the right, put a temporary weight (equal to muffler weight) on the side that does not have the muffler, to counterbalance the weight on the right, and see if the problem goes away.
 

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Or, if its the same pull at low or high speed, maybe the weight difference. If it pulls more at high speed, then it may be the wind resistence of the muffler on the right, causing a pull to the right. Maybe just sticking your left leg out at low and high speeds will identify the problem.
 

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@jjscsix, had an opportunity to check my 2020. Bags empty, tire pressure by factory spec, center seated, light winds with occasional gust, cruise at 65 mph, top of the road, mine is straight as arrow. tried it at other speeds from 40 mph to 120, same results with the exception of wind gust which pushed it left and/or right depending the on the direct of the gust. Lucky me I might have the only 1000SX that fly straight and true!

I also have a 2006 Ninja ZX14 with Yoshimura R&D full exhaust system 4:1 and it steers straight as an arrow. The only bike (out of about 50) that I ever had which had a hard pulling right was a 2007 FJR1300A. That had dual exhaust cans and was probably due to some miss alignment. My experience has been, there is more effect of the crown of the road, wind, loading the bike by a large margin to one side, or the driver sitting off-side, and the wind pushing on the helmet body on some bikes.

Good Luck getting yours to track better, sorry I wasn't of more help.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@jjscsix, had an opportunity to check my 2020. Bags empty, tire pressure by factory spec, center seated, light winds with occasional gust, cruise at 65 mph, top of the road, mine is straight as arrow. tried it at other speeds from 40 mph to 120, same results with the exception of wind gust which pushed it left and/or right depending the on the direct of the gust. Lucky me I might have the only 1000SX that fly straight and true!

I also have a 2006 Ninja ZX14 with Yoshimura R&D full exhaust system 4:1 and it steers straight as an arrow. The only bike (out of about 50) that I ever had which had a hard pulling right was a 2007 FJR1300A. That had dual exhaust cans and was probably due to some miss alignment. My experience has been, there is more effect of the crown of the road, wind, loading the bike by a large margin to one side, or the driver sitting off-side, and the wind pushing on the helmet body on some bikes.

Good Luck getting yours to track better, sorry I wasn't of more help.
That is interesting. We were three for three pulling right until yours. The only thing left for me to hold out hope would be tires. I'm not going to spend the money on a tire until I need to, but in my first 15 days of owning the bike I put over 2,000 miles on it, so it may not be long :)

I just re read your post. You have factory accessory saddlebags on it? It is possible as cudabob stated that it is a wind thing on the big can. Maybe the saddlebags neutralize that?
 

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Not to get too nerdy, but there are 3 large flat surfaces on the exhaust can, that face outward. Air rushing along a flat surface will create a low pressure area, and a suction force that will pull the bike to the right. Same thing as when you go along the side of a long truck, and get sucked inward.
 

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This one would be different than the other bikes with a 4-1 exhaust because this exhaust is lower than what you might see, on other bikes, due to the saddlebags. Also, the old exhaust, the 4-2 was large, but it didnt stick out as far as this one does.

Then again, if this is a built in issue, why doesnt the 4th bike pull? Could different upper body shapes influence this?

We need to figure this out. It appears to be a problem for a lot of bikes. Theres probably 10,000 complaints and very few solutions or answers.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
We need to have Eagle try it again without saddlebags for it to be a true apples to apples comparison.

Let me add something about my BMW 1600s. My first one pulled hard enough that nothing would stop it. My second one still pulled every time, but not as hard. The 1600s have small wind wings just behind the headlight on the front fenders. They can be opened individually to direct a wind blast at the rider.

What I found on the second one is that I could open the wing on the right side (I think right, my memory is getting old) and the bike would run straight as an arrow. Remember, they pulled left.
 
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