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Discussion Starter #1
I finished the 15k mile service on my 2012 N1k. I bought the bike used with 13.5k miles and I put about 500 miles on it before I opened her up. Judging by the coolant crust all around the filler neck, and the black matter that came out of the brake fluid, I don't believe this bike has ever had any service done except for oil & filter changes. Oil and filter looked recently changed but the oil that came out of it was REALLY thin but not black. My guess is, dealer changed the oil and used regular dyno oil.

Here's the air cleaner and spark plugs. I'm really surprised the plugs needed to be replaced at 7.5k miles. The plugs I removed look like they had twice that. The air cleaner was definitely dirty.
Untitled by rogue_biker, on Flickr

Close up of the spark plugs.
Untitled by rogue_biker, on Flickr

Both front and rear OEM brake pads were ok. Looks like they had about 30% life remaining. The inside pads for both F&R pads were worse than the outer pads. I replaced both ends. The brake pad pins where pretty dry and dirty so I had to clean and put a slight bit of lube on them.

I plan to do the valve inspection at 20k miles (in between the US and Rest Of The World recommended interval). Bike is running fantastic; smooth, responsive, starts quickly, idles smoothly, if it ain't broke don't fix it.

After the service I rode it 75 miles. Couldn't really tell the difference until I went WOT. Damn! I felt like it was pulling harder above 7k RPM! Could just be my imagination but it just started stretching my arms as I held on! LOL! I guess the bike is happy it's breathing better, running with fresh coolant and oil.

The Vesrah sintered metal pads....damn! They were beginning to bed it better after about 60 miles of stop and go riding. Suckers are strong! Thanks for the recommendation RC!
Untitled by rogue_biker, on Flickr
 

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The Vesrah pads are pricey but worth every penny.

I have 30,000 miles and will be getting the first valve inspection done very soon. None of my other bikes needed any adjustment at the 15,000 mile mark so I skipped it on this one. Will share results.
 

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Oc , I think we forget just what we are trying to accomplish when we complete these 7500, 15,000 service milestones.

Hopefully, the coolant comes out clean, the plugs look good, and the brake fluid looks nice. The abs pump is a 1200 part. Hopefully, we change all the pieces we are supposed to change, before there is a significant performance drop from any of them.
The only other option is to wait until it's too late. Not good when "too late" includes spark plugs or brake fluid. .
 

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I think I should drag my bike into your SanClemente beach house next time it has the service due. I'm old. senile and tried.

Dont forget to have Ivan flash your 2012. His flashed 2011-2013 engine is one of the nicest engines you will ever run across.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
RC bring it in. LOL! This bike is one of the easier bikes to service when compared to my Honda’s. Thank you Kawasaki.

In my personal experience, fluids are #1 in importance and the air/filters a VERY close second. But I also found that, like you mentioned before, cleaning the brakes, makes them feel really nice again. I’ll bet doing just these basic things regularly will help the bike achieve reliability and longevity most people don’t realize is possible.

Like you, I’ve personally seen and experienced more engines get ruined after valve inspection done wrong than anything. Not by my hand. Checking them is not hard and can be satisfying. Adjusting them is VERY stressful when working with tiny little shims & camshafts removed. I’ve done it. I don’t like doing it. I’d rather not adjust. I’ve known quite a few VFR owners with 100k miles on their bikes...still running reliably...with no valve inspections! Go figure. I’ll inspect mine at 20k and/or before 24k just to put my mind at ease.
 

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You said, "I’ll bet doing just these basic things regularly will help the bike achieve reliability and longevity most people don’t realize is possible."

I agree, and I always concentrate on the linkages. Grips, too. Thats pretty hard to deal with if you want heated grips. The aftermarket heated grips look silly, and the original oens are too expensive. Clutch and brake levers, throttle tube, and shift linkage. The beariged shift kit from Murphs, is 28.00 or such and makes shifting more positive.
You just tell him its for the ninja 1000, and he will hook you up.

https://www.murphskits.com/product_info.php?products_id=463

I always hated wobbly throttle tubes. Its seriously easy, and cheap to fix them. Sure, you can get the 80.00 aluminum tube, but for maybe 2.00 you can get a small sample of the 3m paint protection tape. Cut a 1/2 x 3 inch section and wrap the bar, under the throttle tube add or remove material until its a perfect fit. Like this.....and, if you get a shitload of it, its awesoem for paint protection, and a 3 yr old can install it.

The 2017 clutch perch,and lever is a serious upgrade.
 

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I plan on upgrading the headlight bulbs with Sylvania Silverstar Ultra for $45 for some improved lighting before winter returns and I’m riding at night during my commute.
Any experience with this bulbs at all? I'm also interested in getting some brighter halogen bulbs but you never know what's actually brighter vs the 200% improvement BS manufacturers state on their packaging
 

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I installed the silver stars and it helped a little but nothing worth writing about. (Your eyes may be better at the reception of the color they produce though) I then tried a fairly good set of LEDs that had a surprisingly good beam pattern that produced a noticeable improvement in brightness for me, especially up close but down the road where I really wanted it not so much. I then decided it was time to quit wasting money and do a projector installation. Worth every penny and wish I'd not waited.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I’ve used the Silverstar Ultras on my VFR800, low and bright beams (it had four headlights). It helped. A bit whiter light gave me more color definition of what’s ahead. It also shined light a bit further down the road. I’d say about 20%-30% better. Finally, it did give the headlights a whiter look with a blue center so it looked cool. For $50 it wasn’t a bad investment. I had it on for about 3 years with no failures, and the bike had them until I traded the bike in.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
RC, I bought a set of Pro Grip Dual Density superbike grips. I installed a set of these on my VFR800 and I really liked a few things: they are larger diameter, soft to the touch, and grippy on your hands. It sure made it a lot more comfortable. Each time I got on a bike with OEM grips I missed the comfort of my Pro Grips. I think they only cost $15.
 

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Pro grips are a cut above. Very comfortable, and the material is awesome. Domino grips are very similar, high quality.

My dumb *** is really getting along well with the Oxford heated grips. Their large diameter keeps my hands from going numb. I wish pro grip did a heated grip.

Kenors did that, I think.....he used a high quality grip over the heated pads. It sounded awesome.
 

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I installed the silver stars and it helped a little but nothing worth writing about. (Your eyes may be better at the reception of the color they produce though) I then tried a fairly good set of LEDs that had a surprisingly good beam pattern that produced a noticeable improvement in brightness for me, especially up close but down the road where I really wanted it not so much. I then decided it was time to quit wasting money and do a projector installation. Worth every penny and wish I'd not waited.
Which projectors did you get specifically? I see Profile makes a few. I'm having a hard time getting anything to fit in this housing! My Mini H1's are just tad too long to fit, and those projectors that use the mini HID bulbs are pretty sorry for output and pattern.

I could swear Kawasaki couldn't have made a crappier light if they tried. Poor output and garbage beam pattern, and just compact enough to make sure nothing better fits. It's as if they went out of their way to make sure this bike was useless in the dark.

Looking at the OP's plugs makes me want to change mine out now. I'm at 12K miles, I hate to think what they look like now. Time for some Iridiums. My air filter was easily twice as dirty as the one pictured, and I replaced mine at 10K miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
These Iridium plugs are suppose to last a long time.

For example, the OEM Iridium plugs on my VFR800 had a replacement schedule of 30k miles. Inspect and clean at 15k miles. I replaced mine at 15k miles though and they looked exactly like what came out of my N1k at 14k miles.

If Kawasaki says replace them at 7,500 miles, do they know something we don't? Does it make a difference? The promise of Iridium plugs is they last a long time. Anyway, I paid $30 for the set. Screw it I'll replace them at 7,500 miles.
 

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Oc, I think the sparkplug thing boils down to this. The old 2007 Suzuki rm 125 took a motorcycle specific plug. It was an Ngk r6019...something like that, and it was over 30.00. It was hand welded and would not shake its electrode loose like it did if you tried a br8es in the Suzuki. For sure, many used the cheaper alternative, but occasionally it cost a full top end job when it failed. Our plugs are a generic spark plug, used in Subaru's, and cost about 7.00.

I think we might see longer replacement intervals if we used the hand welded , custom made, 30.00 plugs. Until we do, its 7500 miles and 7.00.

Plus, what's the option here? Run it a little too long and risk? Probably near zero risk, but 7500 miles is not THAT bad, and probably makes sure we never have a spark plug issue.
 

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And I think it's simply an EPA or legal reason or plot to sell more plugs. From experience: 32k mile intervals on 3 VFR 800s with iridium plugs. NONE ever showed any sign of electrode erosion or "crudding up". 25k mile intervals on 2 Ninja 1000s. Again, no sign of any failures. I would defy you to tell the difference between a plug used 100 miles and ones that came out at 25k-32k miles. Heck, my brother's truck has 160k miles on it with the original plugs. He pulled them @100k as recommended and when they all looked new he put them back in.
It ain't the old days RC when my 2 stroke single plugs lasted 1k-2k miles with a couple of bead blasting cleanings in between.

7500 mile plug changes are a waste of resources. Inspect, maybe, for that one in a million failure.
 

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There's no way this bike eats plugs any faster than any other. 7500 is absurd, even for standard plugs. I'll still inspect them soon, but I'll drop in Iridiums anyways, might as well if I'm going through the hassle of pulling that damn airbox. My old FZ6, back when I still had it, went 18K before I even bothered, and they were still ok, and those were just standard plugs. FZ6's rev far higher than our bikes, and they make what feels like only 30hp and 15ft-lbs of torque below 6K RPMS, so I was always riding at 6K minimum. I ride the N1K nowhere near that hard, so no way are these plugs degrading that fast, especially not with Ivan's tune. Maybe the stock tune is way too lean?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That's the rub. If I'm going to be removing the fairings & air box to inspect, I may as well replace. I'll probably put 7,500/year anyway so the cost isn't such a big deal when stretched out over time. Now if I put a lot of miles in a short period of time, then I can see not wanting to spend $30 every 3-5 months. It really all just depends. Nowadays $30 is one dinner at a sit-down chain restaurant once drink and tips are factored in. I'd say a happy medium would be replace every 15k miles. There's also the feel-good factor. For an OCD person like me, $30 to feel good is money worth spending! LOL!
 

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Kenors, it's no different than any other PM procedure. I did not explain the dedicated plug thing. Suzuki said to use the r6918b-8.....the br8es plug would drop right in, and function perfectly. However, on occasion the rpm and vibration patterns would line up and the electrode would fall off the br8es. That destroyed the top end. The motorcycle specific, hand welded plug eliminated that as a failure point, but was 5x the cost.....that's all. Most who ignored Suzukis warning were ok, but that did not mean much to the guy who needed a new cylinder.

Not as if we need plugs that often on modern 4 strokes.

At a 7500mile replacement schedule, Kawasaki is telling us the risk of...something....failure? Increased emissions? No one really knows, but the risk of having some sort of spark plug event just crossed the line into the unacceptable level. That generic cr9 plug is probably good for 100000 in the 6000 rpm Subaru, but maybe not here.

Part could also be really basic. I know you guys have removed plugs after they have been in place for YEARS and know what a ***** that can be. Sometimes you get the threads, too. Occasional removals would help prevent that.
 
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