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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-25-2019 07:04 PM
Chowda Got in touch with Dave Moss and he gave me 3 sets of settings to try. If they don't work for me I will have Traxxion do the rebuild for me. They quoted me a price that I feel is very reasonable. It is an otd price that includes bringing the bike to them for tear down and rebuild. They will also have it completed the same day I bring it to them if I decide to go that route.
I appreciate everyone's advice.
10-25-2019 12:26 PM
Rickifumi Dave Moss has a collection of free instructional video content here, https://davemosstuning.com/category/free/ , dealing with this topic and many others. Minute-for-minute, it's time spent wisely!

Additional content is by subscription, $7.99 / month.
10-25-2019 11:52 AM
goatdriver
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCLandspeeder View Post
The factory manual tells you the base settings.

If I were you I would:

First determine if you feel if the bike is too firm for you. I'm going to guess that it is for your weight. If so do the following--Reduce rear spring preload (that hand adjustable knob on the right side of the bike) one click to soft. Reduce the front fork preload (the top hexagonal adjusters) one level down. Reduce the rear rebound damping a smidgen, about 1/4 turn to Soft (that adjuster that you need a flat blade screw driver to turn on the right side of the rear shock). Do the same 1/4 turn to Soft on both L&R fork rebound damping adjusters that you need a flat blade screwdriver. On the lower right hand fork, turn that compression damping down another 1/4 turn to soft. Now ride the bike a while on a variety of roads and see how it feels now. If you don't like it, you can easily just put them back to base setting.

Second, if you feel the suspension is not bad for your riding but kind of want a slightly gentler ride, just turn down the damping (both rebound and compresson) 1/4 turn to soft just like above. Leave the spring preload alone. Don't expect huge differences in ride and handling. You will feel the change, just won't be like night and day difference.

The N1k's suspension is just above your weight range. The bike is ideally set at the average weight of about 175-195 lbs. If you're only slightly above or below that you should be able to find a good balance. I'd say you probably weigh 165 lbs. with gear on.

I seriously would avoid having someone change out your suspension for you until you've adjusted yours to suit. If you're just not happy, that's the only time you should have the spring rates and internals changed out. It's a big investment on a bike that you will never recoup later on. Just my opinion I just think most people can't really take advantage of a custom suspension because they don't ride hard enough to notice. Most people will benefit more from physically getting in shape, buying really good riding gear, practicing the craft of riding, more than a full suspension upgrade. I've ridden with too many guys with full on Ohlins suspension upgrades or even cockpit adjustable suspension fitted to their factory bikes who can't ride worth $hit. OTOH, I've also ridden with a lot of guys who have stock suspension, some of them with only preload adjustable suspension on bargain bikes, who ride like the wind. Then there are those riders who are Sun Gods....they've got thousands invested in their Ohlins suspension and ride their bikes like they're Top Gun fighter jocks.

Many Thanks! This will help me understand the manual a bit better. Hope to do some of these adjustments in next two weeks.!!!
10-23-2019 06:23 PM
rcannon409 Worst i ever had was with my 98 yz 250. This was before Yamaha had their shit together and made a decent fork.

My 98 was used, but the fork felt ok. Really, I had no complaints like other owners had. Locking up, halfway through its travel? Huh? Mine was stock, but workable..

So, I liked the bike and being a good owner, i changed the fork oil. As I open up cartridge 2, i can see the problem. Dirt, or a tiny chunk of the spring was holding the valve open. There was no compression damping in that leg, and it was in such a spot that it was also messing with rebound. I "fixed" it and the fork turned into a piece of shit.
10-23-2019 05:47 PM
tyrmeltr
Quote:
Originally Posted by OCLandspeeder View Post
But if I'm not mistaken, Goatdriver just bought his 2019. I just don't think it's money well spent right off the bat. However, to each his own. If money is no object, spend away. I would....
Yeah for many it makes no sense going through the suspension until at least the fork oil is toast. That's my plan. I can ride around the deficiencies until then.
10-23-2019 04:50 PM
OCLandspeeder But if I'm not mistaken, Goatdriver just bought his 2019. I just don't think it's money well spent right off the bat. However, to each his own. If money is no object, spend away. I would....
10-23-2019 04:12 PM
rcannon409 This really isnt something you dont spend money on. You can buy a new bike, today and within 2 years, and 10,000 miles it becomes a service item. The stock oil is usually not a quality fluid, and most shocks are "sealed" and need some specialized tools to deal with. Atthat point, why not take the extra step and have it set up for you?
10-23-2019 12:16 PM
OCLandspeeder
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatdriver View Post
You guys are WAY over my head; heck I don't even understand some of your lingo....

I'm like the OP, but only lighter (155) and was hoping to get some insight. Is there somewhere to go to understand how to adjust the front and rear based on this weight? I have read the manual, but still not sure i understand everything. Sorry, to be so stupid, but this is relatively new to me as I never adjusted suspensions before.
The factory manual tells you the base settings.

If I were you I would:

First determine if you feel if the bike is too firm for you. I'm going to guess that it is for your weight. If so do the following--Reduce rear spring preload (that hand adjustable knob on the right side of the bike) one click to soft. Reduce the front fork preload (the top hexagonal adjusters) one level down. Reduce the rear rebound damping a smidgen, about 1/4 turn to Soft (that adjuster that you need a flat blade screw driver to turn on the right side of the rear shock). Do the same 1/4 turn to Soft on both L&R fork rebound damping adjusters that you need a flat blade screwdriver. On the lower right hand fork, turn that compression damping down another 1/4 turn to soft. Now ride the bike a while on a variety of roads and see how it feels now. If you don't like it, you can easily just put them back to base setting.

Second, if you feel the suspension is not bad for your riding but kind of want a slightly gentler ride, just turn down the damping (both rebound and compresson) 1/4 turn to soft just like above. Leave the spring preload alone. Don't expect huge differences in ride and handling. You will feel the change, just won't be like night and day difference.

The N1k's suspension is just above your weight range. The bike is ideally set at the average weight of about 175-195 lbs. If you're only slightly above or below that you should be able to find a good balance. I'd say you probably weigh 165 lbs. with gear on.

I seriously would avoid having someone change out your suspension for you until you've adjusted yours to suit. If you're just not happy, that's the only time you should have the spring rates and internals changed out. It's a big investment on a bike that you will never recoup later on. Just my opinion I just think most people can't really take advantage of a custom suspension because they don't ride hard enough to notice. Most people will benefit more from physically getting in shape, buying really good riding gear, practicing the craft of riding, more than a full suspension upgrade. I've ridden with too many guys with full on Ohlins suspension upgrades or even cockpit adjustable suspension fitted to their factory bikes who can't ride worth $hit. OTOH, I've also ridden with a lot of guys who have stock suspension, some of them with only preload adjustable suspension on bargain bikes, who ride like the wind. Then there are those riders who are Sun Gods....they've got thousands invested in their Ohlins suspension and ride their bikes like they're Top Gun fighter jocks.
10-23-2019 11:25 AM
tyrmeltr
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickifumi View Post
www.davemosstuning.com

Premium membership is $7.99 a month, and his site includes QUALITY free content too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatdriver View Post
You guys are WAY over my head; heck I don't even understand some of your lingo....

I'm like the OP, but only lighter (155) and was hoping to get some insight. Is there somewhere to go to understand how to adjust the front and rear based on this weight? I have read the manual, but still not sure i understand everything. Sorry, to be so stupid, but this is relatively new to me as I never adjusted suspensions before.
You are a perfect candidate to go to the link above, spend $7.99 a month, watch a ton of videos, and school yourself of this subject. Dave Moss will teach you the right way.
10-23-2019 10:19 AM
rcannon409 Goat driver, its really not THAT bad. Just skip this if it is meaningless bullshit....

We need a spring to support the weight of us and our bike. Just as a rough idea, those .85 fork springs I had would be pretty close to the correct weight for you. A 200lb rider needs a spring closer to .10kg/mm. At 240, something like a 1.1kg to 1.2 is more appropriate. The numbers sound similar, but in reality, the changes between the levels are large.

So far, pretty easy, but without some sort of rebound control, all we would have with the spring is a po-go stick matched to our weight.

Thats where the damping controls kick in. Lets go back to my original, .85kg/mm springs. All that means is a specific weight ( .85kg will compress the spring 1mm) we could use pounds and inches if we wanted to. For the most part, they use the metric system regarding springs.

So, why do we need aftermarket tuning? Lets pretend my .85kg fork was set up perfectly for your 155lbs. This means the rebound damping is set up to control this much rebound force. If we drop the 1.1 spring in its place ( times 2....2 springs) the rebound will be too quick. We will be back to the pogo stick again. The suspension people can can change the valving in the fork to match this stiffer spring.

Obviously, there are other adjustments. To some degree, you can open or close the oil passages to make the fork harder/softer. to compress, or slower/faster to return. You can also compress the spring (pre-load) to adjust the bikes ride height. Still, oil does not support weight.

With this in mind, thats how you can tell a 240lb owner will definitely need a fork revalve if they want the bike to perform as designed. The spring rates dont match his weight. No different than someone who wears size 12 shoes sliding into a pair of 10.5 shoes.
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